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TI;E MASSACHUSETTS ( OLI EGIAN, FRIDAY. .11 NE 10. 1932 



HICKEY-FREEMAN CLSTOMIZED CLOTHES 

Iltckcy-Ereoman Clothes are tailc^red by men of lonft experience. Unit is one reason why they are made to fit correctly. 

(iood Clothes are jjood Psychology. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



THE collegp: candy kitchen 



"THE FINEST EATING PLACE IN AMHERST" 



Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



JUNE IS HERE 



Willi Us 



VV eddings and Graduations 

and a sat id 1 

STOCK OF cnns 



Its in 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



We take this opportunity to extend to 

you all, our sincere thanks for the business 

with which you have favored us ^ and to 

wish you all success, 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

14 MAIN STRKET 

Kelween Town Hall anJ Ma«onU- liuildinii 

MEN'S WIIOLK SOLKS ami C^ ^C 

KLIHUKK IIKEIS «?^.^»J 

MEN'S HALE SOLKS and* \ CA 

Rl HHKR HEELS t •*'v 

MEN'S RIHIIER HEELS ^.40 

1.25 
.30 

.25 



WINTER 

CLOTHES 

STORED 

L A N D I S 

TELEPHONE 811-\V 



LADIES' HALF SOLES and 

Rl HHER HEELS 

LADH:S' Rl'HUER HEELS 
LADIES' LEATHER HEELS 

All W'urk Guaranteed 



FISHER'S 

Now Shout ng 

MESH and I.INKN SPORT FROCKS 

SIIK FROCKS in PASTEL TONES or WHITE 

1.50 2.75 5.75 9.95 



COTTON MESH SPORT SUITS 

Wkih- - Crceti - Mais - Bine - P'lnh 

$1.49 each 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 Sear the Toun Hall PHONE 828 



Wright & Ditson TENNIS RACKETS 1 9 .W 

SPALDING— VVRICIIT & DITSON 
TENNIS BALLS 3 for $1.00 KRO FLITE-BULLET-GOLF BALLS 

1932 VidoT GOLF BALL 4 for SI. 00 50c Or S.^OO doz. 

A. J. HASTINGS ""'"VH^^^r' AMHERST. MASS. 



COME OVER TO HAMP 

for your Spring Kuiinjj Clothes and Sport Wear! 

Tull Lint- of I.cultes' and Mt-nV Rulin'^ Bn-cchcs. Hoots. Crops, Jacket^' 
and Coats. l-.xtrfriK-ly l.< w I'rico for M.issacliusetts Students -Si-e I"--. 

i^COLODNY CLOTHING COMPANY 

32 MAIN ST. y w-^ /V/>,./ NORIIIAMPTON 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

OculUta' Preacrlptloni Killed. Rroken lenie* 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one fliftht) 

FEELS GREAT TO HAVE YOUR HAIR 
SHAMPOOED AFTER A HAIRCUT' 

The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 

Vou have tried the rest? 

Nuw II y ilie BEST 
And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 
HAVE YOU TRIED 

A SCOTCHMAN'S OMELET 

SERVED ONLY AT 

BUCK DEADY'S? 

TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

V.' k' >.' Jt 'U '.( 

H. E. DAVID 




COLLEGE JE 



WITH STATE SEAL 



RY 



RINGS CHARMS 

VANITY CASES 

BRACELETS PENDANTS 



Half Prkc 



JAMES A. LOWELL, 



BOOKSELLER 



Special Reduced Prices on Mens and Womens Shoes 

Men's Scotch Grain Bostonian S9 anJ SIO O.xfords S6.35 
Broken Lines Men's $8, $<> anJ $10 Sport Oxfords .S6.35-$7..1'> 
Broken Lines Wc men's S5 Sport Oxfords and Pumps S3. 75 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 



=PHILCO= 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



SANG I I \C HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

RIl'AIRIN*; AM) AIL KIM)S OF 
WASIIINC; DOSE AT RKASON ABLE 
PRICES. 

Our laundry Firiit C.htKS 

Our Policy Cjuuranteed 

NEXT TO TIIK TOWN IIAl I. 



PATRONIZE 
The Sandwich Man 

R. L. BATKS, North Amherst 

College Drugstore 

\V. H. McGRATH. Reg. Tharin. 
AMHERST. - MASS. 



BARSELOTTI'S 

I ;>/■ <',' ■■ >iti!,i Fnimti! Ill 

I R LSI I FRin DRINKS 

IRISH FKl 11 SINDMS 



THE GREEKS HAD A WORD 
FOR THEM! 

Xzespio I born with wings i 
Exhibit A. Mercury Exhibit B. Pegasus 

IN ttu" best families for any otlirrs for the matter) that doesn't 
happen nowadays. Hence the I .lited States Air Corps otTer^ 
some attractive inducements to you college students for whom it 
has built a SlO.OOO.OtX' iastitution at San Antonio. Texas, where they 
teach you to fly and while you are learning: 

I'ay you a sidary of $75.()0 f>er month. I'av ><>iir lixinji expends. 
Sui)plv vou free, of course* with snappy, tailor-made, sky blue 

uniforms. 

('.rant you the social and military privileges of potential officers. 
Pay your traveling expenses from your home to the new field at 
San Antonio. 

Seven hundred men are taken in each year. The course requires a 
\ear to complete and iicUides o\er 2(X) hours of solo flying. Tho^e 
who stay the full year are commissioned as Lieutenants in the -^ r 
Corps Reserve. 

If you don't like the training you may resign at any time. For 
example: Should you stay three months and then resign you will 
receive .S225.CK) cash, your round trip expenses fr<.m \ our home to S:in 
.\ntoni.i, and about .50 hours of solo flying. 

The service and associations of the .Air Corps gives its member? a 
Mr\ 11'. il disti irtioii .I'nl a \ cT\ not iii able lireadth and poise. 

ll M)u iia\c .ii)plied and are ready to gj, we have conipded - 
foiinatioii aii'l tip- siiving you inside av.:les and dope that will e 
iinahiali'; \\i(ii \.'ii airi\r at t'lc t'n !d. i I' >i>u liaMii'i appii' 
tltiii h\- all nuvui- '.;ft our iatorniat in.i. W; til! \i)ii ttic entr,i: 



l)ri nci l;ir( 
(piii kci. 



an 



1 certain t\\i>ls tl.at niak> 



■ ■ iiit'iirinat ion written ia una win 
v.liiMil ■ - ti om bcginniM., I'l md 

in ];n<i'\;u. i Hi- aioriiKition caiiin'; '' ■' 
coninii'ic. Niiiliiiii; (.■l>c to buv. Tlu' ; 



ur ui-uiiK in easier ..' ■'■ 
1. i\ >■ 1 ten tiinni~l; 
that \ou are inCere?;'a 

Min-.l e' 



H t't* 



\ on . ■(' 



NATIONAL AVIATION SERVICE, 

742 S. mil. SI.. I. OS .\N<,i I IS, CM, IF. 



i 



ii 



WEEK END NEEDS 

Whether it's just an extra pair of Flannels or a complete four piece suit by Langrock, 
immediate delivery, complete assortment of shades and designs. 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



4-^*******+' 






A CURRENT EVENT 
IN THE COLLEGIAN 



Read "IdcaU of the Gradu- 
jte School," a brl«f aunt- 
inury of th* main objective* 
and Ideal* In higher educa- 
(lun, by Martlnu* Scrtbleru* 
Kedlvlus In thi* week'* 
.\ilura column. 



/Hbadsacbit^ 




A. C. U^aff. 



Collegian 



orrsTANirtNc; kvent 

The lllle ofbeliifl tl "~ " 
*taiitllna eiAnt of thi 
In stuilenc life I* uwnrded lo 
annual R<iih>-iiuII, In which 
the rtipv, nrml tif the alruln 
of many )«ur«' ulreUhlnA, 
■napiwd liilo two part* 
Imnivtllulvly ufler the iturt 
of Iho fsent. 



Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1932 



Number 1 



Course in Scientific Greek 
Now Added to Curriculum 



GEORGE STEFFANIDES 
TEACHES NEW COURSE 



Class Meets Twice a Week. 
Enrolled 



Twelve 



Responding to the request of many 
students for a course in the Greek 
Ijii^uage, George F. Steffanides '33, 
through an arrangement with the ad- 
ministration, is instructing classes in a 
course entitled: The Etymology of Scien- 
tific Terms, Being an Introduction to the 
.Study of Greek. This course is given 
without credit and classes are held 
every Monday and Friday at 11.30 in 
Room A, Clark Hall. 

Twelve students were present at the 
first meeting of the class last Friday, 
while conflicts with other courses pre- 
vented many others from enrolling. An 
additional number of graduate students 
is expected to enroll this week. Mr. 
Steffanides invites anyone interested to 
enroll in the course before next Monday. 

The course is given to acquaint stu- 
dents with the fundamental principles 
underlying the etymology of the terms 
employed in the scientific courses in our 
curriculum. Mr. Steffanides arranged 
the course with that end in view. In 
(Continued on Pafte 3, Column 1) 




George F. Steffanides 



College Wins 

at Exposition 



AMHERST HONORS 
EX.PRESIDENT 



STUDENT ASSEMBLY IS 
CONDUCTED BY SENATE 

lluuran Explains Stand on Freshman 
Rules 



That this college is "growing-out of 
puerile customs," was given as an ex- 
I)Lination for the abolishment of Fresh- 
m.m Rules, by Gordon A. Houran '33, 
I)resi(lent of the Senate, in yesterday's 
first student assembly of the year. The 
assembly was called for the express pur- 
jHisc of outlining to the entering students 
the i)urpose and function of the Senate 
as the student legislative body. 

In answering the charges that the 
Senate had been undemocratic in its 
manner of abolishing the rules by not 
submitting them for popular suffrage, 
President Houran declared that the 
measure had been taken as a matter of 
exingency, since submitting the propos.d 
to the student body would have resulted 
in unnecessary higgling and uncertainty. 
IK- felt that the measure was in accord 
with recent actions in the same direction, 
which are now effective in mid-western 
uni\frsities. Sloven enforcement of the 
Rules on the part of the sophomores, 
was given as an additional reason for 
doing away with them. 

As a student legislative body, the 
Senate consists of seven seniors and four 
juniors. Its members are in charge of 
suf h campus activities as the Rope-pull, 
Razfx) Night, Informal Dances, Social 
tnion entertainments, and Student Dis- 
cipline. 



Judging Teams and Horses Place at 
Eastern States 

Massiichusetts State College carried off 
honors in dairy cattle and dairy prcnlucts 
judging, military horses, and I'ercherons 
at the Eastern States Exposition held in 
Springfield from Sej)tember lU-24. Out of 
seven teams judging dairy products, 
M.S.C. emerged third with X'ermont 
University first, and Connecticut Agri- 
cultural College second. 

The three men on the State team, 
Robert Taft, Charles W. Moody, and 
Sidney Shephard, all '33, placed fourth, 
eighth, and sixteenth resi>ectively. M.S.C. 
placed third in ice cream, fourth in 
poultry, fifth in milk, and fifth in butter. 
Not to be outdone, the Dairy Cattle 
Judging team placed fifth anumg eleven 
other teams, getting a second high in 
llolsteins, and third high in Ciuernseys. 
H. C. Sotter was third high man in judg- 
ing all breeds and high man in judging 
Guernse-ys. Randall K. Cole was third 
high man in llolsteins. The other men 
on the team were Robert R. Stmkbridge 
and Richard T. Cutler, alternate. 

Led by "Andierst" taking a first in 
the Class W, open jumping, and ridden 
by Sergeant Tanner, the State College 
horses got off to a good start. Others 
that placed included "King Tut," also 
Class Vtf), ridtlen by Captain Hughes, 
fourth; "Ceres" in Class 80. green 
hunters, ridden by Captain Watkins, 
third; "King Tut," second in Class S2, 
green hunters, ridden by Captain Hughes; 
"King Tut," fifth in Class »(>, Olympi;- 
course, ridden by Captain Hughes. 

"Bay State Lilly," taking first in the 
mare and foal class for the fifth year, 
was well backed by "Bay State Lady" 
and "Bay State Laura" to collect a total 
of nine firsts, one third, a Junior, a 
5>enior, and a Grand Championship in 
the Percheron class. 



Roscoe W. Thatcher Receives Degree 

At the Commencement exercises at 
Amherst College last June, former Presi- 
dent Thatcher of this college was a- 
warded an honorary degree of LL.D. 
In thus recognizing Doctor Thatcher's 
work, Amherst College honors l)oth the 
man and the college. President Thatcher's 
citation was as follows: 

"Roscoe Wilfre<l Thatcher, gradu- 
ate of the University of Nebraska, 
long a teacher and internationally 
recognized ex|)erimenter in the bor- 
derlands of chemistry and bioU>gy, 
for the last five years the respected 
President of what has become known, 
under your guidance, as the Massa- 
chusetts State College; by authoriza- 
tion of the trustees of Amherst 
College 1 take pleasure in honoring 
both our neighboring institution and 
you as its head by conferring upon 
you the degree of Do<tor of Laws." 
The former President is now at Geneva, 
New York for a [leriod of study before 
he and Mrs. Thatcher leave for Florida 
where they will spend the winter. They 
left Amherst late in August and have 
spent the intervening weeks in Maine 
and the Adirondacks. Dtxtor Thatcher 
will return to Massjichusetts State in the 
spring as research professor. 



Dr. H. R. DeSilva Made 
Professor of Psychology 

FACULTY ADDITIONS 
INCLUDE DR. FRAKER 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION 

l-ast Friday evening the upperclassmen 
turncrl out in large numbers to take part 
"1 ^'Icoming the freshman class to 
^' i^^uhusetts State College at the 
tra-iitional Freshman Reception in the 
'>i!l Hall. 



Ti. 



reception was in charge of the 



Christian Association and the Y.W.C.A. 

nfT>f .;, Cummings, president of the C.A., 

-hort welcome to the men, and 

' • ( ampbell, president of the "Y" 

'P ' : to the women. Professor Patter- 

iinorous speech, which threw a 

'^ ight on the method of choosing 

ilty of a college and gave much 

■ling advice to the new class, was 

liy a few songs led by Costas 

"'s; then everyone circulated 

■ ill the Drill Hall, meeting the fresh- 

,^ '' dancing started in both the 

' '1 Building to the "vie" and 

'lie Drill Hall to the music of a 

dstily .ssembled but much appreciated 



Enrollment Shows Ten 
Percent Gain This Year 

Sophomore Class Shows Largest 
Increase 



Ninety-four additional students, slightly 
more than a ten iier cent increase over 
last year's registration, marked the en- 
rollment figures issued here by the Dean's 
office. This increase is compared with a 
nineteen per cent increase of a year ago. 
The percentage would have been much 
larger this year had not the freshman 
class l)een limited to approximately o(XJ 
because of cramped laboratory and class- 
room facilities. Registration totals 919 
this year as compared with 822 last year. 

The greatest increase in das- . uroll- 
ment is found in the sophomore class 
which now totals 24.5 as compared with 
194 last year. The number of women 
registered in the undergraduate body now 
totals 24"i. as compared with 195 last 

year. 

Registration figures are as follows: 
Graduate Sc:hool 70; seniors, men 9."). 
women 30; juniors, men 127, women J!; 
sophomores, men 180, women fJ4; fresh- 
men, men 224, women K4. 




CAMPUS CA1-ENI)AR 

lirfiire you btxin onylhini; lake Loumrl, and 
uhen you have taken munsel. there is the full 
time for action. — Sitlluiit, Culilinu I. 

Thursday, September J9 

7 p. ill. (►rilicstra K<-li«-arsal, .Stocklii iijge 
Friday, September .»0 

Ka/ixi Niwlil 
Saturday, October I 

Varsity Football, Howdoin at Brunswick 
'J p.m. Koim- Tull 
Monday, October ^ 

St<K kliriilKi- S-hdol of Asriculture begina 
Wednesday, October S 

:i.2() p. 111. As.-n'iiibly, Frank Prentice Rand 

of M.S.( . 
7.00 prn. Y AV.C.A. Meeting in Adams 

Ilouse 
7.45 p.m. Prof. S. Ralph Harlow at Joncf 

Liljrary 
S.nOp.m. I>l)atinK Meetinu, Room I, 
Memorial KiiildinK 



DEAN GIVES WELCOME 
AT OPENING ASSEMBLY 



States Need for New Emphasis In 
Education 



"We need a new emphasis in education. 
Without neglecting the three R's in their 
very broadest and best sense, it is my 
ho|)e that you will have a real opixjr- 
tunity to stress the three I's which are 
lnde|)endence- the courage to be differ- 
ent; Initiative— the capacity to be dif- 
ferent; and Imagination the joy of being 
different," said Dean William Machmir 
in the opening assembly held at the 
college last Wednes<lay afternrnm. 

Dean Machmer announced that the 
student body is the largest in the history 
of the institution. Freshmen enrollment 
is set at 304, of whom 84 are women. 
There are 18 transfers. While the upjier- 
dass and graduate school enrollments are 
not complete, inrlications from the con- 
stant stream of returning students which 
filed through the administrative offices 
are that full enrollment is to be antici- 
pated. The graduate s<hool will be the 
largest thus far registered at the State 
College. 

Dean Machmer contrasted the present 
opening of the (oll.^e with early open- 
ings as to physical equipment, faculty, 
and size of student body. He stressed 
the value of individual worth in time of 
depression. "Pull dm-s not enable you 
to either get or hold jobs. More than 
ever before you are going to l.c on your 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 4; 



NOTICE 

The first meeting of the .M.S.C 
Debating Sfxiety will l«; held in 
R(Kjtii 1, Mcmori.d Hiiilding on Wed- 
nes<lay, October .'). All members of 
the undergraduate classes are invited 
to attend. 



Dean William L. Machmer 



Globe Features 
Dean Machmer 



Louis M. Lyons, Class of 'IH, Author 
of Article in ll«>Nton l'a|H>r 



Dean William I.. Mai Inner was the 
subject of an arti( Ic appe.iring in the 
lioslon Stindiiy Glolte for S«'ptend)er IH. 
and written b>' l.oiiis M . Lyons, a gradu 
ate of the college with the « lass of 191S 
Mr. Lyons, now re|H)rter and featur*' 
writer of the Hustnti i'liohe, was for se\eral 
\'ears su|)er\isor of the Corres|M>ndence 
(°<iursc-, a position no longer existing, 
lie was also Kxtension Kditor, a jxisition 
now occupied by (•runovv Oleson. He is 
thus well a<nuainte<l with the college ,ind 
well <|ualified to write such an article. 
He is a mcMulKT of l.andxla Chi Alpha. 

Appearing on the editori.il page ol the 
Sunday Glotte, the three columned article 
described Dean Mac hmer's intfr\iews 
with the ".Seven hundred boys and girls 
who clamor to enter a class that can only 
hold tlirc-e hundred." Mr. Lyons spoke 
of the line cjf students that jR-r|H-tually 
wait outside of the Dean's office. "Hoys 
number 301, 302, 303, and so on up the- 
s«iile are waiting their turn to see if 
there are any last-minute gaps in the 
three hundred limitation on Freshmen." 
"A Dean must Ik- a fount of humanity 
cjr he is Icjst," Mr. Lycms continued. 
"From morning chajx-l, through evening 
committee meetings, contacts with stu 
dents fill his life. They file through his 
office and tell him their troubles." 

Cases akin to those Dean Machmer and 
Assistant Dean Lam|)hcar handle are de 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 5> 



Christian Association 

Plans Many Activities 

Rev. Bernard Clausen to be on Cam- 
pus for Three Days 

Inder the leadership of Men Cum- 
mings '.33, president, and Rev. J. Paul 
Williams, advisor, the M.S.C. Christian 
Ass<K iation has planned a program cjf 
interesting and varied activities for the 
coming year. The activitie^ in ,is 
ffjilows: 

1. Karly in Octcjlier the Association 
will hold a campaign for additional attive 
metnbers. According to the old system, 
every student was autcmiatically en- 
rollid in the C.A. upon entering college; 
this system, however, is obvicjusly out- 
wcjrn and must be replacecl by a system 
whic 1) will make the Associ.ili'iii .m ac tiii! 
and not a theoretical organization. Ralph 
Sturtevant '3.'i, will have charge of this 
c .iinpaign. 

2. Throughout the yc-ar a nundier of 
freshman discussicjn groups will be- held 
during the supjK-r hour, probably in a 
rcKjm on the second flfxjr of DrajK-r Hall. 
These discussions will < over a wide range 

(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 3) 



Capt. Herbert E. Watkins Replaces 
Capt. Sumner 



Eight new members have l)een added 
to the faculty of Mass;ichusett9 State 
College this year, namely: 
.\iulerson, Carrolle E., B.S. 

Instructor in Botany 
Hishop, Tena, U.S. 

Assistant State Club Leader 
DeSilva. Harry R., Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 
Fessenden, Richard W., M.S. 
Assista.it Professor of Inorganic 
Chemistry 
Fraker, Charles F., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Motlern 
Languages 
Kellogg, Claude R., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Entomology and 
Beekeeping. 
Smith, Ernest G., B.S. 
Fellow in DeiKirtment of 
Horticultural Manufactures 
Watkins, Herbert E., Captain, Cavalry, 
IJ.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and 'Lactic s. 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 1) 

KAPPA EPSILON STANDS 
FIRST IN SCHOLARSHIP 

.Seniors Make Highest Class Averufie 



Kappa l-^psilon fraternity wc»n first 
place in scholarship during the spring 
term and also placed first in the year's 
a\'cTagcs for fraternities .and sororities; 
the seniors led in both the spring term 
averages and in the year's averages in 
competition among the classes. The 
avcr.iges as compiled by the Dean't 
oftic c- follow: 

Sorority and Fraternity Avcrajtes 

Spring Term 1931-3U 

Kappa Epsilon .80.73 

SiKuiii Beta 79.74 

Alpha Cantma Kho 78.99 

Alpha Lambda Mu .78.74 

PhiZeta 77 89 

TheiaChi .77.46 

Phi Sigma Kappa .77.27 

Lambda Delta Mu .77. 

Lambda Chi Alpha . 70.97 

Kappa Sigma 70.79 

Sigma Phi Epsilon .76.64 

Alpha Sigma Phi ... 75.99 

Icjtal Wcnnen 75.68 

Ttital College 76.62 

Total Men 75.6 

(J.T.V 75.58 

Delta Phi Alpha .... 76 31 
Non Fraternity .... 74.13 

Non Sjrority 73 f>9 

Class Averages 
1931-32 

P.t:i2 Men 81 23 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



Y. W. C. A. 

Last Sunday afterno<jn, the Y.W.C.A. 
held a vesper service and reception to the 
freshman girls in the Rhwlodenclron 
Carden at which the officers and cabinet 
memljers were intrwluced. Each spoke 
briefly c)f the work of her committee and 
invited the freshmen to take fjart in any 
of the activities. Mrs. Stowell (ioding 
told cjf the work of the advisory board 
anci assured the "V" of its supjxjrt in 
the coming year. 

An off-cami)Us mail box will soon be 
found in the .Memorial Building with a 
complete list of telephones of off-campus 
gills, freshman discussion groups under 
the supervision of Shirley Putnam have 
alre.ac|y started to whch all freshmen 
girls arc invited. On Octolicr .">, there 
will be an assfxiation meeting in the 
.Abbey with ("hina as the theme for dis- 
( ussion. A sjKiaker has been secured who 
has s|)ent several years in that country. 
The World l'ellf»wshi{) luncheons will 
start soon. . 



^iHiVS oaD 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, SEPT. 29, 1932 







* 
* 



rStatc Stattc; 



4- 



/nba00acbu6et^ CoUcQian 



Offu iai nt-wspapti- of the Massadiiisctls State College, I'lililished tveo' 
'i hurwla\' by the students. 



BOARD OF KDITORS 



W. Raymond Ward '33 
Managing Editor 



Joseph Politella '.'i3 
Edilnr-in-Chief 



Edmond Nash '33. Eugene Guhalnick '33 

Alfbeda L. Ordway '33 

Associate Editort 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 

Editorial 

Joseph 1'oliteula '3:i 



Campus 

Benjamin Is<;ur "5.'! 
Alfreoa L. Ordway *33 
Ruth U. Campbell "34 
Marriette M. Jackson '34 
Raymond Royal '34 
Mary L. Allen '^.I 
Davhi L. Arenderg '35 
Elizaiietu K. Harrington '35 

Feature 
Stanly F. Seperski '34 



Athletics 

Eugene (Utralnick '33, EdiU* 
Thkodike M. Leary '3d 
Silas Little, Jr. '35 



"Hey Cioggie! lilosv your whistle when 
your ready!" 

"I haven't }{ot a whistle!" 

Han^! lian^! 

The annual rope pull starts. 

C-R-A-C K 

The annua! rope pull ends. 

In too many cases a student comes to 
(ollege to learn how to teach and forgets 
to learn 'i^'hut to teach. 




i; ®n an& off the "Row | 



Exchanftes 

Alfreda L. Ordway '33. Ed^^or 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
Advertising Manager 

Frank Batstone '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. (Iurney '33 

liusiness Manager 



Business Assistants 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Manager 

\V. Lawrence Schenck '34 



Sul)scrii)tions iJL'.OO per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



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In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
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Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
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evening 



Entered as scconrl-class matter at the Amherst Post Oftke. Accepte.1 for m;iilinK aj fPeci^l rate 
of postase provided for in Section 1103, Act of UctoU-r. 1917. authorized August 2U, I'JIS. 



^ 4. «$. EDITORIALS 4^ ^ ^ 

Till-: ODYSSEYS OF 400,000 FRESHMEN 
EACH September becomes a milestone in the history of mcMlern e<lucation. With 
the advent of each school season, our halls of learning are swelled with crowds that 
grow larger each succeeding year. This year in particular, almost 4(K),tK)() ITysses 
will embark upon a fascinating and alluring Odyssey. Some will drift, some will 
float, an<l others will iitiviiiutf to the four corners of the world of learning. They will 
do combat with the Cyclops, be scattered by the winds of Aeolus, seduced by the 
Sirens, detained in the palace of the enchantress Circe,- and finally, the few solemn 
solitary survivors of the storms and shipwrecks of intellectual experience, will re- 
turn to the longeilfor Ithaca. There in the last stage of their triumph they shall 
overcome the suitors of l*eneloi>e, the lady who shall symbolize the peak of cultural 
development, the knowledge of "the best that has been said and thought in the 
world." 

It is very seldom that a situation can be summarized in a literary figure, but the 
representation iK>rtrayed above, seems to our minds to picture the circumstances as 
they exist. While collegiate publications throughout the country expend their entire 
eilitorial space to inform entering neophytes that they are the "largest class ever to 
enter the institution," that "the editors wish them an enjoyable four-year journey 
through the collegiate life." or that they "should be wise in their selection of a field 
of specializ;Ui<m. and yet not neglect extra-curricula activities," let us assume that 
we are a.ldressing a mature group at this college, and seek to establish and under- 
stand some of the premises and problems of education. From these, let the fresh- 
man deduce an educaticmal scope. 

This statement is pathetically true: the greater the degree of democratization, 
the more shallow, trisial, and inconsefpiential become the ideals and motives of 
education. What to the greatest teachers has meant the development and growth 
of the inner self, what to Herbert Spencer was preparation for "complete living," to 
Arnold the "harmonious expansion of all powers," has become to our educational 
institutions, a catechism of materi dism, utilitarianism, and vm\-itionalism- a ""con- 
fusion worse confounded" of worthless methoils, meaningless ideals, and insufferable 
paradoxes. In short, '•Kmralrd^e is Ptwr, is the keystone of contemporary learning." 
This background it is necessary that the freshman seriously intent upon intellectual 
pursuits, should understand, bi the face of this confused maze of not-to-be-dis- 
tangled objectives, it is of vital importance that the newcomer should not for an 
instant lose sight of his destination. Let the novice understand that only in cultivat- 
ing the spirit of s-lf-reliance and independence, only in maintaining his individuality 
through all the trials and tri;>nlati<ms that he encounters, that like Odysseus, he 
must have himself bound to the mast and have the ears of his men stuffcil with wax 
— that only in this extremeness of individuality, lies his salvation. Dean Machmer's 
three I's as a standard for attitude, touch upon the very foundation-stone of all the 
a.lvice that can be given to the college student: IndeiK-ndencc, the courage to be 
different, the scorn of vulgar ideals beiause they are vulgar; Initiative, the ability 
to be different; and Imaginatioi, the ability to enjoy being different. Let the student 
understand that the true education can never have for its object, the training for a 
"job," preparing one for a professional calling, or to provide him with a degree to 
flaunt before the more ignorant; but that it should prepare him for //:/»«, for Life, 
the most sublime of physical and spiiitual functions. Let education assume the 
burden of inculcating into the student the discipline and the refinement of the 
thorough gentleman, let that education lead the free and expanding growth of his 
character, let education impress upon him the realiz;ition that life is infinitely more 
than our senses can comprehend. This knowledge is worth immeasurably more to 
the growth and well-being of our youth, than such superficial, shallow, vocational 
information, as can lead only to material comfort. More than ever must we effect a 
recrudesi-ence of the pristine purity of knowledge. We must eradicate the "solely 
practical" courses from our educational curricula, and relegate them to the Corre- 
spondence Schools, where they properly belong. We must educate the miml. the 
spirit, the body; for education without character-building and illumination of the 
inner-self, is barren and worthless. These things, the freshman as well as teacher, 
in order to swerve from the present educational tendencies, nmst necessarily under- 
stand and put inti) practice. To our minds, a new spirit, an emphasis on values other 
than those for which we now live and become educatetl, must be the keynote of our 

revival. . , , , • , 

This is the chart, the und* rstanding, then, that the freshmen arc to bear with 
them in their Odvssey upon the strange sea. For their destination, their gtxd, let 
them think of education, as Arnold, or as Soi rates would think of it. For to Socrates, 
as to our greatest thinkers and teachers, education does not mean crowding the 
mind with external knowledge, "knowledge from without," and allowing no room for 
the pl.iy of independent thought, or the growth of individual character. He would 
insist that this educational prwess must be the building up of character by the 
"charm of gcKxl words and by examples of high thoughts and noble lives, and the 
awakening to life and activity of that intuitive knowledge of realities, which, as he 
thought, exists in every human soul." These ideals we would have he the compass 
and guide of every entering class. 

(Continued on Pafte 4) 



Sign over the local theatre recently: 
FANNIE HI RST'S 
BACK STRFET 
More and more attention is being paid 
nowadays to the obscure things in life. 

ss 

During the first week or so of the 
college life, the freshmen refer to their 
teachers as Professor So and So and 
Doctor Whosis. C.radually the teachers 
come to be known by their real names, 
i.e., "Whitey." "Dutchy," "Pop," 
"Barney," "Willie." "Doc," etc. 
■ — ■ — ss- • — 
A football candidate was given this 
topic to write about during his con- 
(litiim examination in freshman English: 
"'Why the Stadium needs a College." 
But does it? 

BRIEF INTERVIEWS WITH 
BRIEF PEOPLE 

Sammy Foote. All Northeastern Berk- 
shire County halfback for 1929, after a 
week on campus was still looking for 
Stockbridge Hall. It was not very 
ilirticult to get Sammy talking. 

Reporter: "Why did you come to 
M.S.C?" 

.Sam: "Say fella, did ya ever see this 
picture of me when I won the last game 
for my school? Here you can keep it, 
I got lots more." 

Reporter: "Thanks Sam, I'll show it to 
the coach. But why did you pick this 
institution in w hich to show your talent?" 

Sam: "'I'm glad I came to this college 
'cause they'll be able to see me play." 



-ss- 



She was rather cute and looked inno- 
cent. An interview with her would be a 
pleasure. 

Reporter: "Miss Frosh, what is your 
opinion of the college?" 

';]»■.: "I've only been here a week but 
I've already had a date with an important 
upperdassman. He s;iid so. Vou must 
know him. fairly tall, dark hair and an 
interesting talker, know who 1 mean?" 

Reporter: "Yes, I think I know who 
you mean." (And forty others.) 

'M: "Did you go to the reception the 
other night? Wasn't it marvelous? I 
just love dancing, don't you? I was 
supposed to go to Smith or Mt. Holyoke 
but I thought State is the best college, 
don't you? Of course being a co-educa- 
tional college, there is much more to 
learn of life, if you know what I mean." 

■ ss — • — 

To think that there are over 300 of 
them and nothing can he done about it. 



ss- 



With the rope pull ending in a draw, 
the Sophs have a chance to outclass the 
Frosh or vice versa; with the emphasis 
on the versa. 



-ss- 



Coach Mel Taubc has three Joes for 
backfield positions on his team. "Smoky" 
Joe Sheff. "Smoothy" Joe Lojko, and 
""Jumping" Joe Coburn. 



-ss- 



Now that fall rushing is over the 
freshmen have a chance to orient them- 
selves. . . The only way a freshman can 
be distinguished now from an upper 
classman is that the freshman is generally 
better dressed. . . Once more the fresh- 
men reception proved an excellent oppor- 
tunity for the upperclassmen to become 
acquainted with the fresh (womem. .. 
The frosli rules are gone but the trolley 
is yet to be abolished. . . Remember 
freshmen, do NOT refer to the fraternity 
as the FRAT. . . There is no mistaking 
the ';3t') frosh hats for only a freshman 
would have the nerve to wear these cute 
white skimmers . . . and at what angles! 
The co-eds are forgiven. 



-ss- 



Thc Collegian is a very good thing, 
The school gets all the fame; 

The students all the benefit 

But the staff gets all the blame. 



IDEALS OF THE GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 

It is written that "much learning is a 
burden to the spirit," and that of "mak- 
ing (the author might well have said 
reading) of books there is no end." 
Apparently, however, many college gradu- 
ates do not feel that the weight of 
knowledge accumulated during their four 
years as undergraduates is too hea\y a 
mental load, for the campus this year is 
suggestive of an indefinitely extended 
Home-coming Day for alumni, to say 
nothing of students from other colleges 
who are enrolled in the graduate school. 
The present situation suggests a few 
comments upon the nature of graduate 
work in American colleges and univer- 
sities. 

During the first part of our country's 
history, even an undergraduate college 
course was considered to be for the few 
- -for those who, being ])resumably more 
interested in intellectual pursuits than in 
the achievement of material i)rospects, 
intended to enter one of "the profes- 
sions": medicine, law, or the ministry— 
or perhaps teaching. That attitude, of 
course, has been long abandoned. The 
democratic ideal of mass education inevi- 
tably made, a good many years ago, a 
college education merely a stepping-stone 
to a ""job." Flxcept in a few isolated 
individuals, any interest in the things of 
the mind for their own sake simply 
ceased to exist, as everyone is aware who 
has any knowledge of the topic. But 
even then the graduate schools remained 
for the most part untainted by vocation- 
alism. Only men of excejitional intel- 
lectual ability either desired or were en- 
couraged to continue their study after 
completing the undergratluate course. 
Though anyone might get a bachelor's 
degree, the ))ossession of a master's or a 
doctor's degree still had some signifi- 
cance. It is true, no doubt, that the 
graduate schools containe<l plenty of 
pedantry, and that the worship of "the 
letter which killeth" was more prevalent 
than devotion to "'the spirit that giveth 
life." But at least the ideal was there, 
of devotion to truth for the sake of truth 
and not for the sake of its price in the 
market place! The poet's eye at least 
could still discern 

". . . the Veritas which lurks beneath 
The letter's unprolific sheath. 
Life of whate'er makes life worth 
living." 
But now the inevitable consummation 
of the American itieal of education has 
been reached; even the graduate schools 
have enlisted heart and soul in the march 
of American Babbitry toward the shrine 
of Mammon. And even the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy is no longer sought 
or granted as a badge of intellectual merit, 
but as a certificate of initiation into the 
high I riesthcKxl of the Goddess of Getting- 
on. If one is going "to get anywhere" 
nowadays, whatever be his chosen field, 
he cannot collect too many degrees. Each 
one is regardetl as a definite commercial 
as'set, and nothing more. Nor is any 
other attitude to be expected. If the 
gi.Uibility of tho^e who guide the des- 
tinies of our systems of education and 
business leads them to jutlge applicants 
of |X)sitions upon the basis of the degrees 
which they possess, it is inevitable that 
greater and greater numbers will seek 
those degrees, and. regardless of ability, 
will get them. These persons expect to 
get paid for having degrees; therefore, 
they are willing to pay for them; and 
some of our institutions of higher learning 
a»e n< t only willing to give students any- 
thing which they will pay for. but even 
seek to create a demand for the goods^ — 
in this case, degrees — which they have 
on sale. If they can sell to society the 
idea that a master's degree is indis- 
pcnsiblc to the raieing of onions, or a 
doctor's degree to the selling of Fuller 
Brushes, and one or both to the teaching 
of third grade arithmetic, the demand for 
degrees will inevitably increase. Thus 
the racket grows and flourishes. 

It wouKI once have been appropriate 
to ask the guiding powers of our American 
graduate schools to meditate upon the 
fact that it is written: ""Many shall run 
to and fro. and knowledge shall be in- 
creased." But now. though the many 
have become wore, and the pace has 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 2) 

i 



After a summer of restful inactivity 
the Row once more awakens to hum .. Jtli 
new life, and struggle over new probl. ms. 
The houses were all scrubbed, and ihe 
members all awakened to new entl-usi- 
asni. Now. as a result of a great deal of 
conviuiing argumentation, the consump. 
tion of several kegs of cider, the destmc. 
tion of many bushels of api)les and 
loads of doughnuts and cigarettes, 
to mention picnics and banquets; t 
house takes great pleasure in announi 
its pledge lists: 



ar 
.(jt 

111; 



O.T.V. 

Class of lO.'iO— Philip B. Anderson of 
Framinghain. Randolph C. Barrows of 
Stafford Springs. Conn.. Leo W. Colilns 
of Millis, Francis E. Connolly of Peabody, 
Eugene \'. lliggins of Blackstone, ami 
Charles Krtil of Westfield. 

Alpha Gamma Rho 

Class of 19:«>— John Casewell of Mil- 
ford, Earle M. Chase of Monununt 
Beach, Murray W. George of Wrentliani, 
Kenneth Newman of Pittsfield, Howard 
C. Parker of Bondsville, Harry D. Pratt 
of North Adams, Charles S. Puffer of 
Westfield, Oliver R. Putnam of Danvers. 

Theta Chi 

Class of 1936— Roger Allen of Shrews- 
bury, Chester Z. Brown of Springfield, 
James Davidson of Norwood, Ralph W. 
Dimock of Oxford, Allyn H. Fisher of 
NotwocmI, Chester M. Gates of South- 
bridge, William Hall of Brookline, Richard 
T. Kennett of West Medford, Richard 11. 
Lake of Westfield. Edward \'. Law of 
Belmont, Richard H. Thompson of 
Colrain, and Leslie W. Williamson of 
Allston. Classof 19:J5— Samuel Macl.eary 
of Oberlin College. Class of ia"{4- 
Chas. Hutchinson of I'niv. of Vermont. 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Class of 19:5(V Ralph T. Adams of 
Athol. (iordon 11. Bishop of Athol, 
Malcolm R. L)unbar of Barre, Hamilton 
A. Gardner of Belmont. Kenneth GilUttt, 
John MacCouchie of Monson. Angus 
McLiod of Ipswich, Wendell Pott<r of 
Melrose-, James A. Valentine Jr. of Sjuth 
Walpole, .Spofford Whittaker of Medford. 
Class of 193")— George Curtis. 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

Class of 193«;- Donald Ballou am' 
John Fallon of Holyoke. Herbert Fergu- 
son of Pittsfield. Frederick Jenney of 
Kingston. ShcKlon Kuran. Robert Kcefi 
of Westfield. Charles March of F■ee.lin^; 
Hills, James Ryan of South lladky, 
Robert Ryan of Hatfield, Sanford Shon- 
goiMl of New York City. Asa Waterman 
of Rehoboth. Charles Wootlbury «'l 
Springfield. Class of 1934— R. F. Cos- 
tello of Franklin. 

Kappa Sigma 

Class of VXHV Chester Babcock Jr. of 
Newtonville, Allin Battles of Sherborn, 
Arthur Bixby of Sunderland. Alfred 
Brueckner of Springfield. Leo Carbon- 
eaux. James Clapp of Springfield. James 
Clark of Milton, N. Y., John Croft, 
Dean Click of Amherst, Calvin Hanniim 
of Pittsfield. Robert Lincoln, Warrtn 
Rivers. Frank Rose of Winthrop, William 
Rose of Winthrop, and John Stewart of 
Needham. 

Class of 1930—Milford Davis, and 
Charles Elliott. 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

Class of 193()— Myles G. Boylan of 
Watertown, George E. Monroe of Uf) 
mouth, (ieorge A. Vassos Jr. of Si)nni;- 
field. and Walter A. Wanio of Maynard. 

Kappa Epsilon 

Class of 1930— William W. Chilson of 
Northampton, Donald T. DonnelK of 
Chester. Robert B. Fisher of North. niip; 
ton. John Hobard. Richard A. Kuha ol 
Greenfield, Robert M. Logan of Lawr. -^ 
Francis A. Lord of Northampton. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Class of 193<i— Kenneth A. Bart-n of 
Dalton, Robert B. Clark of Sh,.ron, 
Albert W. Dodge of Wenham, Russtil 1- 
Ciriswald of Lancaster, Harold H. Hale 
of Tolland. Donald H. Taselhul.n o' 
Springfield, Ivan N. LcClair of S.uith- 
bridge. Charles H. Moran of East B"?*""' 
Fred J. Murphy of Belmont, L. Park-f^ 
Robert Peckham of Medford, Rii'i''' 
Peckham of Medford. P. Ri'i •''''■' 
Phiilip J. Spear of Charlemont. 

Delta Phi Alpha 

Has undertaken deferred pledge' 
this vear. 



SPORTS 



Soccer and Cross Country 
Prepare for Coming Season 



FORTY-FIVE BOOTERS 
REPORT FOR PRACTISE 

Sircer offers great promise for another 
i^iicissful season as 45 men are compet- 
,i,M ii,r berths on the 1932 team. Eight 
li.tt.rinen have reported back, as well as 
,i.\tr.il veterans of last year's second 

team. 

Although the loss of six varsity \Aiiy- 
^.r> ihrough graduation will be strongly 
iflt, Coach Larry Briggs is trying to 
flinch the situation by working new 
„an into the vacancies. Only one stiff 
scrimmage has been held to date and 
that indicated that the present team is 
,jtviio|)ing faster than did last year's 

squad. 

Hitchcock and Council will be hard to 
replace in the backfield, and Jorzack's 
position of goalie will be troublesome to 
lill. However, the forward line should be 
lister and shiftier than it has been 
formerly. The team lacks hea\-y men, 
but a stronger offensive should remedy 
this The lettermen who have reported 
this scison are: Cowing fb, Ibxlsdoii fb, 
Sluinian hb, Pruyne hb, Taft f, Koz- 
loubki f, Jackson f, and Mackimmie f. 



GEORGE STEFFAMDES 

TEACHES NEW COURSE 
(Continued from Pa^e 1) 

his oi>ening lecture, he briefly ga\e his 
rt.is<jns for offering such a course. He 
K\\i\ in part: "When one considers that 
out of the seven million words found in 
the English dictionary, eleven per cent 
an- directly and another twenty-five per 
ant indirectly derivetl from the Greek, 
and of these more than eighty-five per 
nnt constitute our scientific terminology, 
hi- (;ui realize the necessity of even a 
partial study of the (Jreek language." 

Concerning his method of instruction 
in this class. Mr. Steffanides has this to 
s.iy: "I have used the modern Greek 
mithod because I am firmly convinced 
th.it it is the best, easiest, and by far 
the more nearly correct than any em- 
iiluvid both in this country and abroad." 
The work of the course is dividetl into 

I three ni.ijor [larts. The first is a general 
survey of the fundamentals of Greek 

k'ranim.ir; the second is devoted to strict 
etymological derivations, and the thirfl 
consists of several hundred scientific 
terms in common use. "With the first 
part I hope to enable the student to 
read and write simple Cireek words and 
phrases, and to understand their con- 

htrurtion." Mr. Steffanides explained. 

I With the second part I expect to enable 
the student to grasp the methwls of 
word-formation and their etymological 

|«rurture. . . With the third part the 



HARRIERS START WORK 
FOR SIX GAME SCHEDULE 

Four lettermen, Captain Caird, Craw- 
ford, Snow, and Gallup, are in the group 
of thirteen men who have reported for 
cross-country. More prospects will prob- 
ably turn out in time to train for the 
first meet with Tufts on October 15tli. 

On the jirosent squad, several men 
stand out as being very promising. 
Caird and Snow, two of the l»est men on 
last year's team, should be well up in 
front again this >ear. Along with them 
will be Crawford, varsity letterman. Bob 
Murra>', the winner of last year's meet 
in which the freshmen triumphed o\er 
the junior varsity, Stockbridge ScIum»1, 
Amherst College freshmen and junior 
varsity, may be counted on. Crosby, 
who won his numerals in his freshman 
year, and Gallup, letterman of two years 
ago, should be assets. 

To fill up the rest of the team, Coach 
Derby has several men to choose from. 
Allen, Little, and Warner won their 
numerals on last year's strong freshm.m 
cross-country team and Shaw earned his 
in track. Jordon. W. llovey. and Dwor- 
man are new men. The schedule: 

Oct. 1.5 Tufts at M.S.C. 

2\i Worcester Tecli at M.S.C. 

'M Amlicrst at M.S.C. 

.\ov. 4 St. SU'phcns ;\t .\imandale 

14 New KiiKlanils at Huston 

in HotXixaxaletu at Bosloa 



Student will become familiar with the 
stock words of science and learn to form 
new words, and derive the meanings of 
unknown terms." 

.\lt hough it is impossible to give credit 
for Greek at this college, the .administra- 
tion will record the fact that any studeiil 
has taken the course on the permanent 
record of the student. 

An outline of the course follows: 

I. A thorough study of the Greek alpha 
bet and its relation to the English 
language. 

II. A study of the pronunciation oi 
words. 

.•\. The study of diphthongs and their 
English e(iui\alents. 

B. Uses of accents and breathings. 

C. MethfKls in word huihiing. 

III. Simj)le grammatical elements. 

A. Simple present, jiast, and future 

tenses. 

B. Nouns, adjectives, adverbs and 

conjunctions. 
1\'. A study of cardinal and ordinal 

numbers. 
V. Canons of Etymology. 

A. Isolation of prefixes, suffixes an<l 

ro<jts. 

B. A study of words pertaining to the 

parts of the body. 



State College Banners, Pennants and 
Stationery 

Loose Note Books 10c to f 5.00 

Fountain Pens $1 to $10 



College Slickers 
All Eastern Colleges 

Laundry Cases $1.50 

Fillers L'.'c 



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NEWSDEALER and 
.STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



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SILK FROCKS in PASTEL TONES or ffllHTE 



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GOOD NEWS — PRICE REDUCTION 

WEBSTER'S COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY 

$3.50 was S.').00 

A Strong binding — Will last years 



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Box of Scjiiare Leads 
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'^'^'^^'^^^^'^'^^'^'1^ 



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Chru the Iknot Ibolc 






Coach Mel Taiibe showed hiniselt to 
be a fine sportsman la.st .S.itunl.iy when 
he willingly agreetl with the request of 
the Coojier I'nion coach to shorten the 
last two periods to ten minutes, in plate 
of the regulation fifteen minutes. 

Freshman football will be coached this 
year by none other than Cliff Foskett, 
the captain of the first Massachusetts 
State College f(»otball team. The frosh 
will be divided into seven teams anil pl.iy 
a round-robin schedule with each other. 

Ernie .Mitchell, last year's baseb.dl 
captain, is varsity trainer this ye.ir in 
place of Floyd Brackley. 



"Dovie" Bush carried the ball eleven 
times in the Coo|K'r I'nion g.ime for 247 
yards, an a\erage of 'J2 yards each j.iunt. 
.Not bad at all! 



Joe Schelf averageil nine yards in eight 
attempts, while Moe White's average was 
eight yar<ls in nine attempts. Johnny 
Consolatti. the soi)homore halfback, matle 
40 yards in four trips with the ball. 

Joe Scheff is a tr.uisf»r from Willi.im 
and Mary Colleg*-, \ irgi.'ia. In his 
sophomore year there, Joe scored the 
only touchilowii for the southern college 
when Navy defe.ited William and -Mary 
2()-f>. 



Rod Cummings, the sophomore who 
started the CiMJix-r I'nion game at guard, 
was the discus and shot-put champi<m 
in school boy ranks in Conne< ticut. 



PRESS COMMENTS 

"Mass. State is going to prove a 
stumbling block for some of its ob- 
it(ti\e opponents, as they have a 
hard running backfield and a hard 
line to break through." 

(ieorge B. Kelleher 
Sfningfield Kepiihluan 



C. Intensive study of scientific terms 
from: 

1. Botany 

2. Physiology 
."?. Entomology 

4. Chemistry 

5. Z<K)logy 

(\. (ieneral subject matter. 
\'I. Simple coll.iteral reading in modern 
conversational Greek. 



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And that's the 

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and 

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for 
Table Covers or Wall Hangings 

Miss Cutler's Gift Sliop 



State Downs Cooper Union 



Meets 

LOUIS BUSH FEATURES 
MAROON and WHITE WIN 

I ed li\ C.ipt.iin D.m Leary and Louie 
Bush. Coach Mel Taube's Massachusetts 
Stat*' College footb.ill team opened the 
season with a .")((() victtiry t)ver t'ooper 
rnion, on ;\lumni l-ield last Siiturday 
aftern(K)n. The Maroon and White ath- 
L'tes stored practically at will during 
the entire contest, and although the 
Cooper Cnion eleven was thoroughly 
outcl.isscd, it otTered courageous oppo- 
sition. 

Within a minute aftir the opening 
kickolT. Bush took the b.ill on an end run 
,in<l ratted li.'J yards for a touchdown. 
However, the try for the extra point 
failed and (\H>per I'nion kicked olT to 
.State. After a few j.iunts \)y .Moe \\ hite 
and Bush had placed the ball on the five- 
yard line. Bush again dashed around 
left end for a touchdown. State again 
failed to score the extra jwint when 
Mush's attempted place-kick was blcnked. 
Near the close of the first (piarter Bush 
shished through tackle on a twent\ nine 
yard run for his third touchdown after 
which JiK' Coburn, the State fullb.n k, 
hammered his w.iy through center for 
the extra point. 

Coach Mel T.iube inserted an entirely 
new eleven into the contest at the st.irt 
of the second jn-rioil. Several long runs 
by J(K- S<heff pla< ed the ball mar the 
goal line, and Johnny Consoloiti kiiif«(| 
ihnjugh tackle for a touchdown. I'rigard 
scored the extra ixiint on a line plunge. 
State again gained ]K)Ssession of the b.ill 
by reeovering a fumble and Joe Sthcll 
flashed eleven yanls around en<l for a 
touchdown. SchelT missed the tr\ for 
the extra point. T(jwards the close of 
the first half, Bill Frigard drove through 
it'nter fr«»m ("oo|)er Union's one-yard line 
f(ir the sixth touchdown. The extra 
point was again missed. 

Mush s<-ore(l twice more in tlu- second 
h.dl with runs of tiO and 40 >ards. lor 
the fourth period. Coat h Taube sent in 
a third eleven which was unable t«» store. 

Louis Bush leil the s<«>ring with fi\c 
touchdtjwns, while SchelT, Consolatti and 
Frigard eath scored one. Massachusetts 
State displayed a great set (A plunging 
backs ill Bush, St helT, White, Consoi.itti 
and Frigard with an excellent line h-d 
by Capt.'iin Lear\', Sic-\-ers and Mountain 
The team shows promise of ha\ ing .i very 
successful season. The summary: 

Maaii. Stale Ontper Union 

J.iiknyizyk, Wihry. McGuckiaii, Moijiiiaiii. Ii- 

ri'. Ariic k. Kosi'ii 
CuniminK. (iiiiiriiiiiKs. It rt. Aiitliiiiiv, l.rviiu- 

L.eavitt. iiurkc, Bickford, Cutlrr, (iilklt. Ik 

m. ViMO. I'luetz 



Saturday 

VICTORY SHOULD MARK 
GAME AT BRUNSWICK 

\ he Mass.ti husetts State College foot- 
ball team will meet its first slilf oppo- 
sition of the seastiii when Coach T.iube's 
th.tiges play Bo w(U)in College at Bruns- 
wick, Maine, on October 1st. It will be 
Bowtloin's first to nlest of the year, while 
State has defeateil C(M)per I'nion. Two 
Ne.irs .igo the Massachusetts footb.ill 
team was defeatetl by Bovvdoin 400. 
I. .1st year, howfvr-^' Coach Mel Taube's 
first .Slate College football eleven turned 
the t.ibles on the Maine team, winning 
■_'.'>(). .Although Bowdoin clid not have a 
\ery sutre.sslul team last year. Coach 
Charles Bowser, has moulded together a 
MMN' vitrong combine, from the forty 
pl.iNcrs that reported to him, and prcmiiscs 
to furnish rugged opposition tcj the State 
ollense. This year's team is built around 
Ciptaiii Milliken. center, anci Tt>rrey, 
gu.ird, the only veteran pl.i\irs left in 
college, together with Kic hardson, Hub- 
bard and M,ikanc>wsk\ , who substituted 
in III.- b.ii klit Id l.ist year. Alt hough Coach 
Bowser will miss the services of the 
flashy Captain Kicker, he has ,i i-ap,iblu 
substitute in John llubb.ird, fuUbat k. 
Hubbard is the stm of John Hubbard, Sr., 
the most f;inious football pla\er e\ir to 
graduate from Amherst College, llub- 
b.ird was c liosen by Walter Camp on his 
all American team in I'.KM.t. John Hub- 
bard Sr. was fcw)tball coath at State 
from lull bS, and tiirntcl out highly 
siictessful teams. Ctiacli Taube has sent 
his team through many long workouts in 
prep.iration for the Mowcloin contest, .mil 
State will take the field against Mowcloin 
with full strengib hoping to rcjicat l.ist 
year's \ic lory. The line up: 

Mass. Stale 
Kyan. h- 
Cummings, It 
I eavitt. Ig 
Cajit. I eary, c 
.Siiisoii, rg 
SieN'ers, rt 
Mountain, re 
Bigelow. <|b 
Bush, Ihb 
SchelT, rhb 
IVigard. fb 



Howdoln 

Ic'. Davis 

It. Mc Keniiey 

Ig, Tor re y 

c, ('apt. Milliken 

rg. Mason 

rt. Low 

re, Kent 

c|b, Birdell 

Ihb, Bakaiiowsky 

rhb, keed 

fb, Hubbard 



l-c'iiry, (jrixwold, bept-rtiki. c 

c. Krit'ciinun. Kinlisdi 
.N'iftiipitki. Sibiion. Morun. rg 

Ik. lirc-iinan, (ialMT 
GuzuwHki. Sieveti, Di Marzio. MuIImII, u 

It. I'ranke 
(irifliii, Kyan. TikofHki. KaniHili-ll, ri- 
le. Kcihl. Orta. I'rrra 
KJKi'iow, Ix>jko, f|h (|l). AiiUHlaiiia. Caix-ii 

White-. Slicff. < oiisolatti. rht) 

llil>. i'hllli|i<, lliiilon 
(oliurn, Kritfard, fb lb, Bt-rKi-r 



I y D\J» ' . We welcome you a.s all of our friends to M.S. C. 
We assure you we will (((ntimie i«» j;ive the same 
excellent value in hi^'h ^rude clothing' that we have 
done for o\er forty years. Standard merchaiulise at 
lowest prices consistent with quality. Start rij;ht 
with us. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



SHOES FOR COLLEGE MEN 
and WOMEN 

See our windows and display in College Harber Shop 
for newest .styles in college footwear 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



GREETI NGS 



To all State Men and sincere wishes 
for a successful year. 



E. M. SWITZER JR., Inc. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. SEPT. 29, 1932 



WALSHIZATION PAYS 

In every college community there is always one store which by its unchanging class of merchandise, 
policy service and student popularity, becomes "THE COLLEGF SHOP." You w.ll eventually know 

that shop in Amherst is "The House of Walsh." 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



tUrrORIAL MISCELLANEA 
(Continued from Pag* 3) 

We are happy to welcome as the first contribution to the AGORA for this term, 
the brief expose by Martinus Scriblerus Redivius of the methods and idi-als now m 
VOKue in our gra.luate schools. The ruinous mass ideal, the democratic sp.nt. agam 
wreaks its havoc in higher education, with its stress on practical thmgs. and Us in- 
sistence on free and unrestrained opportunity for everybody. The laughable facility 
with which students manage to procure both masters' and d.xtors' .legrees m our 
institutions, must remain as a stigma, the brand of infamy, of American education 

Wc judge the writer to have done wisely in recognizing the gigantic task ol 
remedying the situation. w> that it seems to us .,uite proper to present the situation 
merely as a "social phenomenon," and leaving it to the reformer to find a way out. 

It h-is been said by the lovers of all those studies which return only intellectual 
satisfaclion that the classic studies can never die. Certainly, the encouragement 
afforded to' Mr. Steffani.les' course in Scientific Creek by both the admm.stration 
and the student l.o<ly of this college, is worthy of praise. We will express the hope, 
that this may not be the last year in which the course will be offered. 

For the interest of those to whom collegiate life means a series of extensive social 
engagements which are interrupted by such things as class attendance and periodical 
examinations, we would call attention to the rich sacrifice that others must make for 
an education. An Associate I'ress dispatch carries the information that at the 
Arizona State Teacher's College, food for both men and animals, is being accepted 
in lieu of tuition. 



FACULTY ADDITIONS 

INCLUDE DR. FRAKER 

(Continued from Paft« 1) 

Dr. H. R. DeSilva. formerly of the 
University of Kansas and Mc(Jill Uni- 
versity at Montreal, has been appointed 
full professor of jisychology here. Dr. 
DeSilva received his Doctor's degree from 
Harvard and Camliridge in England and 
studied with Lindvorsky at the Univer- 
sity of Cologne, C.ermany. While with 
Lindvorsky he translated into English 
two of the hitter's treatises. "Experi- 
mental Psychology" and "Theoretical 
Psychology." He also served two years 
as national research council fellow and 
tutor for two years at Cambridge Univ. 
After two years op the faculty of 
McGill he went to the University of 
Kansas where he taught three years. 
He is a member t»f the .American Psy- 
chological .Association and the Optical 
Society of America. He is the author 
of many treatises on psythological i)rol)- 
lems. 

Several of his articles have been pub- 
lished in the Jounuil of General I'sy- 
clwloiiy, the Jonrtiul of l:\perimtitldl 
Psychology, and the Anuriiai J our mil of 
Psyi holof^y. 

The a<lding of a full professor to the 
psychology staff of the college in time 
when retrenchmint in education seems 
the rule is taken by Professor (ilick as 
indicative of the growth of the scope 
and interest in the subjcet. 

A laboratory for the study of expiri- 



mental psychology is being develoj^d 
and experimental and abnormal psy- 
chology will be included in more com- 
plete courses of the curriculum. 

Dr. Fraker is a graduate of Colorado 
College and received his Master's and 
Doctor's degrees from Harvard. For 
three years he taught English and Biology 
in the Philippines, and then for seven 
years he taught StKial Science at North- 
western University. Dr. Fraker is now 
assistant professor of modern languages. 

Captain Watkins received his A.B. from 
the University of Maine in 1017 and then 
attended a cavalry school until 1921. 
After taking an advanced course in 
Field Artillery in Oklahoma. Captain 
Watkins has come to this college as 
assistant professor of military science 
and tactics. 



AGORA 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 
become faster, the only thing that has 
been increased is confusion. 

The writer makes no prediction as to 
what lies ahead and has no suggestion 
to olfer as to a way out of the present 
con<litions. if indeed there be anybody 
wln» desires to find a way out. He merely 
desiribes the situation, and presents it 
to those who are scientifically mindeil. as 
an interesting social phenomenon; those 
who do not happen to be scieiitifi.ally 
kiniled, he advises to cultivate the comic 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

PLANS MANY ACTIVITIES 
(Continued from Page 1) 

of subjects and will be conducted by 
Costas Caragianis '33. 

n. Through the kindness of Rev. Mr. 
.Anderson of Greenfield, the AssotMation 
has obtained permission to use, for the 
purpose of overnight camps and dis- 
cussion groups, a farmhouse near Lake 
Wyola in Shutesbury. A new fireplace 
is the one thing needed to make the 
house ideally fitted for use by such 
groups, and the building of this fireplace 
is a project which the Association hojieS 
to get started on as early as possible. 

4. Rev. Bernard Clausen of Syracuse 

will come to M.S.C. during the first part 

of Thanksgiving week for a three-day 

visit sponsored by the Association. At 

that time our guest will deliver addresses 

,and lead discussion groups on topics to 

I be announced. In past years Mr. Clausen 

has been one of the most popular visitors 

to the college. 

5. During the winter term the Asso- 
ciation will conduct its annual old-clothes 
drive for the benefit of some group among 
the thousands who will suffer from the 
cold this winter. 

(). The Association will conduct its 
annual campaign for funds for the Red 
Cross, also during the winter term. 

7. Under the supervision of Ray 
Ward '33, plans are being made for a 
student conference in January, at which 
some problem of outstanding interest and 
imi>ortance to the undergraduate body 
will be discussed. The subject has not 
yet been decided upon; however, the 
problem of student-faculty relations has 
been suggested as a subjccc. and any 
other suggestions will be gladly received 
at Mr. Williams' office in the Memorial 
Building. 

S. In May and June the C.A. will 
direct the preparation of the Freshman 
Handbook for the class of 1937. 



KAPPA EPSILON STANDS 

FIRST IN SCHOLARSHIP 
(Continued from Page 1) 

Women . .81.58 
Total »l^l 

1933 Men 78.9(5 

Women . • .79.85 
Total 79.17 

1934 Men "4.73 

Women . .75.19 
Total 74 85 

1935 Men 71.18 

Women . • .70.58 
Total 71.01 

Total Men 75.43 

Women . • .76.14 

College . . . .75.35 

Class Averages 

Spring Term 1931-32 

Men Women Total 

1932 81.41 80.39 81.10 

19.33 78.33 79.11 78.51 

19.34 75 41 7G.47 75 07 
1935 71.12 71.41 71.2 
Total Men 75 

Women . . . • 75. (■)8 
College . .75.02 

Fraternity Averages 
1931-32 
Kappa Epsilon . ■ .80.92 

Sigma Beta Chi (Sor.) . . .80.23 
.Alpha Lambda Mu (Sor.) . . 79 <»« 
Alpha Gamma Rho . . • l^ ^^^ 
Lambda Delta Mu (Sor.) • 78.7 

Phi Sigma Kappa . . • . 78.5() 
Phi Zeta (Sor.) . • .77.09 

ThetaChi 77.51 

Lambda Chi Alpha • • ^V^^ 

Kappa Sigma 70 81 

Delta Phi Alpha . 
.Alpha Sigma Phi 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Q.T.V 70.21 

No.i Fraternity . • ■ • 73.«j5 

Non S jrority 73 . 7 

Total Men 75.43 

Total Women 75.14 

Total College 75.35 



driven from behind by necessit\ and 
drawn from before by possibility,' ^uj,] 
the Dean. Concluding Dean Mai mer 
said: "The task is sufficient, the da\ .s at 
hand. With joy and confidence we ,vel. 
come you as fellow searchers after iruth 
in the college which is now preinrtr] 
under its new name to render a wider 
and more real service than ever behjie." 



GLOBE FEATURES 

DEAN MACHMER 
(Continued from Page 1) 

scribed. "A boy from Lynn has pel.iKd 

his bicycle the KK)-mile trip to .Amherst 

for the second time since he passed his 

State College examinations, to see if he 

can find a job. No job, no college." A 

humorous case is reported. "A boy who 

wants to transfer from another (ullege 

and is shy some credits, has hzougk 

along his big brother, a college graduate, 

to use his educated eloquence on the 

Dca 1 in lieu of the missing requirements.'' 

"Dean Machmer does not fo^^;et a 

personality," the author said. "He has 

known every student at the State College 

for 20 years, for the last ten years as 

Dean. They have brought him the uray. 

ness around his ears, but also the nn lldw, 

crinkling lines around his eyes." 



70 . 77 
7i3.54 
76.39 



Am 



ATRF 



spirit! 



Martinus Scrihlenn Rediviuf 



THURS. 
SEPr. 

29 



FRl. 

SEPT. 

30 



M.S. ( . MKNS MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"Let Dave do if 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



SAT. 

OCT. 

1 



Thnllinft and Authentic 

"<:c)N(;oRii.i.A" 

with 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Johnson 



I'ncllla Dean in 

•BKHINU STUNK WAI.L.S" 

:iml ON THK ST.\GK 

ill person 

LORD JKKK SKRKNADKRS 



MON. 
OCT. 



Typing 

First Class Work Low Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

TeL494-M opp. "Phi Sift" House 



PATRON IZK 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



Everything in Hardware 

and Radio Equipment 



PHILCO= 



ruES. 

OCT. 
3 



Pat O'Brien 

Mrs. Harmon (). Nelson 

(Bette Davis to you) 

in 'HELL'S IIOl SK " 



tnive Brj>ok Lila Lee 

Charles Ruftilles Frances l>ee 

in 

"NIC;llT OF Jl'NE I.V' 



WED. 

OCT. 

4 



June Clyde 

in 

'THE THRILL OF YOLTH" 

Starts where all other 

thrillers leave off. . . 

"WHITE ZOMBIE" 

with 

Beta (Dracula) Laftosi 



DEAN GIVES WELCOME 

AT OPENING ASSEMBLY 
(Continued from Paft* 1) 

own." In distiissins independence, Dean 
Mailimer stated: "In your legitimate 
right as individuals this colleRC protects 
you lioth within and outside the lerturi' 
hall. Whtn our opinions honestly arrived 
at riprn into lonviitions then we have 
taken the first step towards indepen- 
dence." "Initiative makes for growth, 
while imagination may l>e defined as the 
constructive or creative faculty. Wc are 



INDEX PLANS 

Fausl, the inspired dramatic poem of 
(ioethe. is the theme on which the \9-'A 
Index will be based, according to a 
rtvent announcement by editor-in ciiid 
Ralph W. Dexter. The story will hi' div 
played throughout the book in the sanii; 
manner that Hanvulf was used in the 
11K52 Index. He is assisted by K()K»r <,. 
Bates, literary editor; H. Roger .Alton, 
art editor; Ambrose T. Mct.uikijr. 
photographic editor; and Hleamir b 
Cande, statistics editor. I lenry A. Walk.r 
is the business manager, while the .nl- 
vertising is in the charge of l'ak;e 1. 
inland and the circulation is under the 
direction of Edward J. Talbot. 

Elections to the Index Board are to 1* 
held soon in order that the work ni.iy 
progress as rapidly as possible. 



NOTICE 



Prof. S. Ralph Harlow of Snnth 
College, Stxialist candidate (or reitre- 
sentative from this district, will speak at 
the Jones Library Wednesday, Octokr 
5th at 7.45 p.m. 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATH, Reft. Pharm. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



Have you tried 
A SCOTCHMEN'S OMELET 

Served only at 

BUCK DEADY'S? 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculist*' Pre»ctiptlon» Filled. Broken len«e» 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

r«ll«bl« make* 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one aiftht) 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRI.NG AND ALL KINDS OF 

WASHING IX>NE AT REASONABLE 

PRICES. 

Our Laundry Flrtt Cla«i 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



GORDON SILK HOSIERY 
59c 79c $1.00 $1.35 pair 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 

COME OVER TO 'HAMP 

for your Spring Riding Clothes and Sport Wear! 

Full Line of Ladies' and Men's Riding Breeches, Boots, Crops, 
Jackets and Coats. Extremely Low Prices for 
Massachusetts Students -See Us. 

COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 



Feels great to have your hair 
shampooed after a haircut! 

The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 




TYPEWRITERS 
for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



''The finest eating place in Amherst'' 

SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 



INCORPORATKD 



A CURRENT EVENT 
IN THE COLLE(;iAN 



V* 

4' 



The Culleftixn preventu "The 
Student aa a Thinker," a 
lummunication of current 
iniereat by Xenos, in this 
»eek'« Aftora column. 




oi;tstam>in<; kvknt 
of the wkke 



^ollcgian 



■V Aa u ulilniflcunl event In the 

^y wrek'H nrwa coniea the an- 

Jm nuuiuenient (hul after u 

*V* liipjif of two yvarit, the 

J. I'ollette will revive the i'u«- 

*V* loin of obitervlnil Mountain 

^ Day. 



\o\. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1932 



Number 2 



Community Concerts to be 

Given Again this Season 

DRIVE FOR WeMBERS 
FROM OCTOBER 10-15 



Accordlnji to Plans .\nnounced by 
Professor Wau&h 



I'rofessor Frank A. Waugli, Presidt-nt 
ol the .\mherst Community Coiuert 
Assoriation, has announced that coni- 
imiuing October 10 and continuinn 
through until October 15, a <!ri\e will be 
romlucted to obtain members for the 
.■\ss(Kiation. The Association will spon- 
sor at least three concerts during the 
coining season and admission to these 
(oiuerts will be solely by membership 

cards. 

Professor VVaugh said that teams had 
|)een formed to canvass the town in 
order to secure members. The team 
which will canvass this College is under 
the chairmanship of I'rofessor Stowell C. 
(".(MJing. Membership cards are priced, as 
l:i>t year, at five dollars for adults and 
two dollars and fifty cents for students. 
"This is an exceptionally reasonable 
price," said Professor WauKh, "for there 
are three concerts of high degree to be 
given here at Amherst, three in Spring- 
field, and perhaps three in Westfield; all 
of which can be attended with a member- 
ship card to the .Amherst Assoiiation." 

The number of members secured and 
the amount of money obtained in the 
(lri\e will determine what (onterts wi'l 
he available for .'\mherst members. .At 
the end of the <lrive a secret committee 
in conjunction with a representative of 
the New York .AssfX'iation will choose the 
artists to ap[)ear on the .Amherst program. 
Their choice is restricted solely by the 
mone\ available, for the .A9sociatir)n 
controls sixty per cent of the high class 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 4) 

PROF. KELLOGG COMES 
TO M.S.C. FROM CHINA 

.Studied, Experimented and I'autiht 
in Orient for Twenty Years 

Professor Claude R. Kellogg, appointed 
Assistant Professor of Kntomology and 
Beekeeping in January of this >ear, 
!<;>int twenty years in China as a teacher. 
' ;"rimenter, and student. He was 
ti.K her of biology in the .Anglo-Chinese 
College in Focxrhow for five years, and 
for sixteen years, Professor of Zoology 
in the Fukien Christian Cniversity at 
F'v-xhow. 

I'rufessor Kellogg as an exf)erimenter 

>n ''( Chinese University, came in con- 

I !■ ' with the vital problem of developing 

■1 k worm capable of producing the 

''"■ ■ silk. Infected with disease, the 

"iiK uurin was commercially unprofitable. 

Mr Kdlogg and his asstniates attempted 

■ ' ed out of the worm a parasite 

': destroyed its value. 

I.i> work Professor Kellogg has come 

•>w the Chinese people. He has 

in describing them: "The Chinese 

t in contrast to the .American 

must be constantly watched and 

'< iled to take exercise. He is a 

il scholar and is so desirous of 

ng that he will not take time for 

The Chinese respect the s<"hol- 

pt. They hold the student before 

^^ontinued on PaAe 4, Column .S) 




KXMIBITION OF ETCHINGS 

-sor Frank .A. Waugh's ])erscmal 
in of reproductions of famous 
- is loaned for exhibition this week 
dcmorial FUiilding. 
tigh the etchings are jjrinted 
"f the originals, they are in some 
I good that one can hardly tell 
' rence. .Among the artists repre- 
iti this collection are: .Anders 
'' Swedish painter and etcher, and 

^\ Henson, a native of Massiichu- 
/')rn received most of his insj)! ra- 
il the Swedish peasiintry, which 
"ntinued on Pafte 2, Column IS) 



laOUNTAlNDAY 
RE-ESTABLISHED 



To Be Celebrated October 12 in I be 
Traditional Manner 



Prof. Frank A. W augh 

Education In Mualc 



S. S. A. Students 
Return to Campus 

Registration Reacbes Two Hundred 
and Thirty-live 

One hundred and twenty freshmen and 
II.') seniors have enrolled in the Stock- 
bridge School of .Agriculture for this 
( oining year, the latest registration records 
show . These members of the Stm kbridge 
S< ho<d come from e\er\ st.ite in the New 
llngland group and hIso from >>««. j*r»ey, 
Illinois and Michigan. The average age 
is somewhat more than the age of last 
year and is around twenty-one. Last 
year the Horticulture ami Floriculture as 
majors were favore<l am«ing those enter 
ing, but the reconls for the current year 
show a inarke<l interest in .Animal Hus- 
liandry and in Poultry. 

During the past week the freshmin 
have been busy becoming oriented, tak- 
ing mental tests, and visiting the various 
de|)artnunts. The Stot kbridge freshm»ii 
will be especially noticeable this year, be 
cause of the fact that the Stcxkbritlge 
Senate has ruled that the custom of 
wearing freshman caps shall be con- 
tinued. Last year the State College 
Senate abolished this custom which had 
long been in vogue among the M.S.C 
freshmen. 

Class suppers for the class of 19.34 were 
hehl on Monday and Tuesday evenings. 
October H and 4, at the Ccdlege cafeteria. 
.A prominent graduate was invited by 
each department to sjH-ak to the fresh- 
men and to give information concerning 
the situation in the various fields. 



Sophomores Victorious 
Over Frosh Razzo Night 

Win Boxing, Wrestling, and Nigbt 
Sbirt Parade 

Defeatinu the freshine i in the boxing 
and wrestling matches in the Cage and 
in the- Night Shirt P.irade on South 
College Field, the sophomores were de- 
dared victors in the annu.d K.izoo Night 
contests held last Frid.iv. The contests 
were under the supervision of the Snate 
and conducted accf.rdiiig t-. lnten-olle>;iate 

Rules. 

Norman Myrick ':{<» and Lester Wil- 
liams '.'}') were referees of the boxing and 
wrestling matches respectively, while 
Costas Caragianis ':« announced the 
bouts. Seven matches were held, five of 
which were won b> the sof)honiores. In 
the first match, (ieorge Curtis '.{.5 out- 
boxed Forest Hart in ".ie,. Colund)Us 
Bonzogni threw Walter Lewis in the 
sec.md lu.itc h after a moment's wrestling 
to give the sophomores another victory. 
The third match, a boxing bout was won 
by Joseph Dwortnan M.") over Ihman 
(iold ';<»'•. In the fourth man h. wrestling. 
(Continued on Pafte 4. Column I) 



Mountain DaN', as an aiuiual feature, 
is to be resumed after a l.ii)se of two years, 
according to infcjrmation recently issued 
by a faculty connnittee. This > ear's 
obser\ance of the aiumal custom is to be 
conducted on Wednesday, October 12, 
when the entire college will be ])ermitted 
to adjourn to Mt. rob\' to spend the 
holiday. The administrative committee 
will pro\i(le for lunches for all students, 
and bussc-s will be available at S..{() a.m. 
for those who do not care to walk the 
entire distance. 

Mountain Day is one of the oldest 
customs of the college. The students had 
long been accustomed to s|>end a day on 
Mt. Toby but it was in I(t2;{ th.it the 
school ofhcially journeyed from the pre- 
cincts of Ji'fTtown to become Alpineers. 
The (M-casion t'cir the excursion was the 
dedication cjf tiie new fire-tower. There 
was a program of speakers and a series 
of contests pie eating, tree climbing, 
and wood chojjping. .After that year 
Moiuitain Day became an aimual cus 
tout. The cha|)el bell would unexjHHtedly 
begin to ring at 7. .'IK tci declare to the 
delighted stucK-nts that the cl.iy would be- 
a hcjiiday. .A crowd would rush ik-II- 
niell to the caxalry stables to be- the first 
to claim the horses. .Ancjther prcnession 
c»f students wouhl set out from the 
Colonial Inn in trucks, in autos, on 
bic-ycles, anci on f(M»t. .At the toji of the 
mountain, a luncheon of a]»ples, cider, 
and hot clogs woidd be serxcd, followecl 
((>>ntlnued on Pafte 4, Column 3) 



Professor Rand Addresses 

Assembly on Wordsworth 

ILLUSTRATED LECTURE 
SHOWS LAKE COUNTRY 



CAMPII.S CALENDAR 



I'hf -uiirlil IS litu mtifh 7iilh m.\. Inlf anil stxm, 
CelthiK itttil Spending, K-e Iny miUe our t>i/ncrs; 
I. title ue stt in .N aliitt that «s ours. 
lie hart liirrn «ur hearts nniiv, <i surilut lnjiin'. 
- W'lliiam \[ 'iriliuortli 

Thursday, October 6 

7.:M) 11.111. ( ollftiiun (iiiniK-litioii. Cullciiiii" 
Offid- 
Friday, October 7 

7 :yi |i.iM lt;iiii| KiliiMr^al. 1'. K.. (.!«•• 

s.lNl [>.iii. liitoriii.il. .Mriiiorial HmldiiiK 
Saturday, OcKiher M 

\ .irsity K<x>ll)all. Mii|(lW>ur>' at MicldMmry 

Wif'^ilv S<M nr. W.IM. at Won i-sti-i 
.Sunday, October •> 

J.OO II. [II. Oiitiim CIiiIj Ililcc to .Mt. Tom 

;{.(K) ii.iii. I'hiltiitrinonic Orciicstra Ccjncert, 
Memorial H;ill 
Tuesday, October It 

.siici|iiii. c .iiMiiM^ < liiircis, Mrinorial Bliln- 
Wednesday, Octolwr 12 

Iloliclay 

Mountain I>ay 

M.tJU v.m. (Jrcliettra Reiiearsal. StoclcbriclKi' 
I^all 



TROPHY IS AWARDED 
TO KAPPA EPSILON 

Kappa Sigma (Monies Second in 
Interfraternity (Competition 

Kappa L|>silon fraternit\ has won thi-, 
year's possessicjn c>f the Interfraternity 
Trophy according to a recent announce- 
ment made by the Dean's office. The 
Kapp.i Fpsilon fraternity takes the- cup 
away from Kappa Sigma, which hehj it 
List year, the- first year in which it w.is 
awarclecl. 

The c iiji is hehl for one year by the 
fraternity gaining tiie greatest number c)f 
points which are olfered for partic i|)ation 
and excellence in such endeavors as 
chcjral singing, interfraternity spc»rts and 
acaclemic and scholastic- activities. The 
cup is awarded for |)ermaii< in pcissession 
to the fraternity group which gains first 
])Iace in the c-omiK-titions for three con- 
sccutive years. For the academic year 
1!I.'J1-.'J2. the fraternities jiliKc-d in this 
order: 




Prt)f. Frank P. Rand 
"l>orothy's Cood Friday" 



1-t 


Kiipim Ejwilon 


2ii(l 


Kii|i|ia Signia 


:',r<l 


I'hi Sixuia Kajipa 


■nil 


.Mpha C.ainnia Rlio 


.-.th 


Simna I'hi F,i»!iil4jn 


Citll 


Tlieta (hi 


Till 


l.amh'la Chi Alpha 


.Mil 


Q. T. V. 


'nil 


.Alpha SiRtna Phi 


loth 


I>lta I'hi Alpha 



(;ollkc;l\n try-octs 

.All students interestetl in trying out 
for the editorial board of the Collegian 
please rejKjrt at the office of the 
Collegian in the "NC building at 
7.HII p.m.. Thiirsd.iy. October •> 



Graduate School 
Enrollment 132 

M.S.C. and Tbirty-nine Olber 
I nsl i t u t ions Kepresen t ed 

One hundred and thirty-two students 
have been enrolU-c| in the nr-nluate 
school this year, according to a recent 
statement issued by Director I- red J. 
Sic-vers. Of this number, 17 arc from the 
M.S.C. gradu.iting cl.iss of l'.t:{2, and l.'i 
.ire from the class of I'.KU. Thirty-nine 
other colleges and universities are repre- 
sented in the group registration. < )| t he- 
total number enrolled, only six students 
arc- now cloing their research work for the- 
clc^;ree of DcNtorof I'hilosophy. 

IiK re.ised f.icilitie-s ha\e been pro\i(|ed 
lor the students selecting graduate courses 
in the department of education through 
the- apiioiiilinent of Dr. Il.irry K. De Silv.i. 

This ihangc- provides an opportmiit\ lor 
the ty|K- c)f development th.it the- insti- 
tution is interc-sted in prcnnotiiig 
namely, to offer strcjiig courses in t he- 
several science and arts departments in 
the ho|K- that sttnlents may se-lec t their 
major along these lines, and tc» su|)port 
this program with suffi ient courses in 
the elepartment <)f education to ejn.dify 
the gradu.ites for teaching [Misilions. 

This eiicl is consiclere-cl the- primary (unc- 
tion of graduate work in the- department 
of i-diication. 

The science- clep,irtments which arc- 
attr.icting the largest number of students 
,ire Chemistry, Hac teriolo>;\ , MoiatiN, and 
Lntomology. There is a strong cU-mand 
for gracluate courses in the department 
of Knglish and an increasing interest on 
the part c)f many stude-nts to select 
their m.ijor in this field. 

Dad's Day Planned for 

November 5 This Year 

Arranged by Student (Committee 

Daci's Day, Saturday, .\o\end>er .'), 
will be entirely a stuclent j)roject this 
\e-ar. arranged ancl executed by a stu- 
clent committe-e a))|Kiintccl by the Senate 
ancl uncle-r the c-hairmanship of Costas 
Caragianis. 

De-finite plans fcir this clay h.nc- not 
as NC't been formed by the ccimmittc-e. 
.A \arsit> football game with Kenssale.ir 
Polyte-c hriic Institute is sc licdule-d. .Alc>n« 
with the- game the- committee- has re- 
ejuested c-m h fraternit\ t'< :irrai<ge- for 
the iiresentation of a short act in Hc»wker 
.\uditorium that night. To dale these- 
are the only events schednlecl for the day. 

The committei m charge consists of 
Costas Caragi.iiii-, r iwiirman, Kclward 
Il.irve-y. Clifton .MiNtroni. Parker .Sisson 
and Sylvia Wilson cjf the class of lit.j.'i, 
Frank Hatstone. Kuth ( ampbell, Frc-c|- 
eric k Clark, Page Hilancl, Harriette 
Jae kscm, Marjorie Jense-n, W. L. Schemk, 
ancl Flizabeth Wheeler of the class of 
Ht.{4, ancl Mary .Allen of the class of VJ.i'). 



"Oorothy's C;«M>d Friday" 

Memories of Dorothy and William 
Wcirdsworth were cont. lined in Purotliy's 
(;(>c<c/ h'rtday, an illustrated lecture given 
by I'rofessor Frank Prentice Kand in 
llowker Auditorium Wednesday after- 
ncKtn. 

Dorothy's (!ood Friday was an aitual 
holy day billing on .April Ki, 1802. On 
this cla\ Dorothy ami her famous brother 
Willi. III! WOrdsworth tr.impe-d fiftee-n 
miles through aome of the most interest- 
ing ancl piiturescpie parts of the Lake 
Country. The I. .ike region is a district 
.ibout thirty miles 8(|uare 'n Cumberland 
.ind West more-land in the north of 
l-!ngl.ind just south of .Solway Firth. 
Here are found (irasmere, Kydal Water, 
Lake Windermere, the little river (ireta, 
and the Cataract of Lodure. This small 
rt-gion has been the home of innumerable 
pcH'ts ancl the inspiratitjn of the greatest. 
Wordsworth, Siuthey, Colericlge, De- 

< iuinc>' and Shelley are only a few of 
those who once lived here. 

With the aid of stert-opticon slides, 
Professor Kand ac-ted as a guide in re- 
traversing with the audience the romantic 
journe-y of this brothi-r ancl sister. The 
couple commencc-d their walk at Patters- 
dale which stands at the he-ad of Lake 
rilswatc-r. Here it was that the night 
be-forc- the-ir departure- Wordsworth saw a 
(ic-ld of datfoclils whic h many ye-ars later 
inspired him to write / Wandered Lonely 
lis a Cloiiil. 'flic- following morning they 
left Patterscl.ilc- on their w.iy licniie- to 

< irasmere. They crossed seve-n or eight 
f.imoiis .iml be.iiitifiil bridue-s ancl slopped 

(Continued on I'aftc 4, Column 4) 



DR. FRAKER FORMERLY 
TAUGHT IN PHILIPPINES 

Comes Here from .Ndnb\%esU-rn and 
llurvurd 



Dr. Charles F. I'raker, newly-appointeei 
.Assistant Professor of Modern Languages, 
re-ee-ntly g.ive his impressic)ns of the 
Philippines where he s|K-nt several years. 
Dr. T'r.iker taught in the- Lac>.i^ High 
S hool ancl was Curator of the Industrial 
Muse-um in Manilla. 

In his coiii.'ict with the Tilipiiios, Dr. 
l-rakc-r c;ime- tc> knenv them exceptionally 
well. Ill giving his ini|)ressions of the 
Islancis ancl its pe-ople- he- saiel: "The 
Philippines as a nalic)n ctr as a race are 
still uncle\e-lojK-d; a chilc|-|H-ople. Me»W- 
c-ver, in sc IichiI the-ir ehilclre-n learn very 
rapiclly until the age cjf e-ighteen. Frejm 
tli.il time e>n, their assimilaticjn cjf know- 
ledge- is greatly retarded, exce-pt those 
stiicleiits, of course, who h.ive- iiniisiia! 
abilitv. Childrc-n ctf inixc-cl IiIcmicI, Chinese 
and Philippine, or Spanish ant] Philip|)ine, 
are- vc-ry brilliant in contrast to the pure 
Filipine. 'Those cjf inix«-d blc«»d are in- 
variably (Militicians. 

"Pre*, i'.'tis !'• the entrance of the- I "nite-e! 
States intcj the Islancls, there were eighty- 
five different tongues spoken by the island- 
ers. The .American infliie-nce h.is sup- 
pressed most of thes<- languages and 
I English is now wicle-ly s|K)ken; many of 
(t>>ntlnued on Page 2, Column S) 

PHH. HARMONIC CONCERT 

.Arture* Toscanini. probably the worlcl's 
forc-mc)st living musical conchic for, will 
direct the New N'cjrk Philharmonic 
Symphony Orchestra in its cj()eninK con- 
c c-rt to Ih- presented by raclio this Sunday 
afterncKjn at .'{ p.m. in .Me-morial Hall. 

.Amo.ig the com|K<sers whose wcjrks will 
be [)layed are Tansman, H.ic h Sehordierg, 
Debiiss\-. atiel Hr.ihms. The |irojjr,im 
follow > : 

T.iiv-iii 111 l''ili'«ii Dan-irs 

I'olka. Kujawiak, Diinilca. (Hn-ri-lt 

■ 1 ' 1 «-r(otn«in( «r in Amc-rim) 

Bath-SchonixTK Organ I'tt-lucle 

FuKur in K flat 
I>,.l,ii.,.v l.a Mer 

Iir:ehiii!> Symphony No. 3 



\ 



I 



\ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. OCTOBER 6, 1932 





State Static: 



^ 
^ 



/llbasgacbugei^ Collegian 



Official newsiaiKjr of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Thurh<lay by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Josef II I'or itei.i.a '.'}:) 
/•.ill rin-i hiff 

W RVVVOM) WVH) Xi KI'M'IVU N VSII "S-i. ElUENE (iUKAI.NKK '33 

Maiiacing liU^r Am kema L. 0>vi>\vav "« 

.\i\<)fiate r.diturs 



DEI'ARTM I-.NTAL BIJITORS 
Kdltoriul 
Joseph I'ijuiei-la "S-'J 
Campus Athletics 

Bknhmin Is'.ur .'.:( Eitgene (Iukai nick '^X Editor 

Ai-FKEr.A L. Oudway -33 Thj od i E M. Lb^rv 3,1 

Kith li. Campbell '34 Silas Littlk. Jr. 3j 

Harkiette M. Jackson '34 
Raymond Royal '34 
Mauy I-. Allen '3.') - . , 

ELiifAiETH K. Hm<rin..ton :'.:> Alfreda U. Okdwav 33, Editor 

Feature 
Staslv v. Sei'Erski '34 



Edward J. Talbot "34 
Advtrtiung Manager 

Frank Uatstone '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. CIckney "33 
Huiiness Manager 



Business Asslstunts 



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Cirnilation .Uana^er 

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Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for "lailiiiK •}' SP€«;'^1 ^te 
of postage provided for in Section 1103. Act ot October. 1917. authorued August 211. I'Jl.V 



^ ^ ^ EDITORIALS ^ 4* 4* 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND THE 
IDEA OF "PAN POLITIKON" 

INTKRN.VnoN.AL PEACE and gootl-will, world-brotherhood, complete dis- 
armanjent, the outlawry of war, passive resistance all these movements and sfxial 
ideals must remain as chimerical, fanciful, and \aiiily conceived, so long as lust, 
greed, and ignorance remain rampant within the nature of man. All our Uto|)iaii 
holies will remain within the realm of the fantastic, so long as the nations of the 
world mouth peace plans at one moment, and take stock of thejr arniainents the next. 
The ideals of the caveman, his lustful and unbridled passions, have retained a mar- 
velous vitality in the course of social evolution, and so far, men have not become 
masters and rulers of these greeds and desires. 

In spite of the tone of hopelessness and dismay that is engendered by a full 
recognition of the facts that smother these pan-l'topian ideals, the case for world- 
uiiderstiMiding an.l worhl-citizenship is not yet lost. It is still left to us to strive lor 
these chimeras, although our undertaking means persistent struggle with the lower 
nature of man. To our mind, one of the most potent forces which makes for the 
tlispelling of provincialism, national egotism, and political sectarianism, and leads, 
above all, to cultural interchange antl the diffusion of knowledge is the system of 
student exchanges between the univtrrities of the United States, and those of foreign 
countries in Europe and Asia. It seems to us that these cultural exchanges, will 
jwrhaps work more effectively than any other factor, in leveling the differences of 
racial and national misunderstanding. This educational intercourse we deem the 
strongest bind in the realization of the Pan-Politikon, the political whole of human 
relationship, the future, far-off future, world-citizenship. And this opinion is not 
totally unfounded. When one considers the tremendous numerical growth of foreign 
students who enter our colleges and universities each year under this system of edu- 
cational reciprocity, as it were, he will realize to what extent others seek our culture, 
and we theirs. More than 1(»,(KHI of these foreign university students sought our 
shores during the past year, coming from Russia. China, Japan, Germany, England. 
India. Italy, France, Korea, S<<itland, Ireland, and from practically every nook and 
corner of the earth. The United States government has made sjiecial provisions and 
allowances for a siiecificd cjuota of these students in our immigration acts. We are 
firm believers in this student exchange method of interchanging the world's thoughts, 

attitu<les, and feelings. 

W ith these facts in mind, we opiwse as being inconsiderate to the students af- 
fected, as detrimental to the fulfilment of international amities, and as being un- 
wise, and unjustifiable, the recent decision of Secretary of Lafior, William N. Doak, 
which forbids to foreign students admitted outside of the specified (juota fiasis, the 
privilege of engaging in part-time or vacation employment to pay their way through 
the American sihools. The avalanche of criticism which has been loosened by many 
American educators, seems to us quite justified and commendable. We can agre.^ 
with the opposition of such men as Dr. Cloyd H. Marvin of George Washington 
University, Dr. John II. McCracken, associate director of the American Council on 
Education, and Dr. William John Coojier. that, as in the words of one of them, the 
ruling "is reactionary, stupid, and clearly against the interests of the American 
people. . ." This depriving students of the opportunity to engage in ri^gular employ- 
ment, is considerably ditTerent from the privileges accorded our students abroad. 
The action is particularh to be depW>re<l because of its unfair and unvsarranted flavor. 
As Dr. Frederick B. Robinson, president of the College of the City of New York 
summarizes the case, "One of the best agencies for promoting international under- 
standing and gootl will, is the interchange of professors and students. It was in 
recognition of this truth, that provision was ni.\.le in tin immigration law to exempi 
students duly accepted by accredited institutions of learning in the quota count. 
To construe student part-time employment ■< * l.dior incompatible with the student's 
privileges of study, is unw ise, and lacking in consideration." 

This is not a contention that these cultural exchanges of students will lessen the 
probabilities of war, nor that if we propagandize an anti-militaristic education, we 
will be able to outlaw, and finally eradicate war. Any pacifism which maintains these 
ideas is absurd and senselc?'. Am -in h ;i (oiut ntinn is simply a refusal, or inability. 
to recognize the basic workings ot human nature, and the accumulation of i)rejudices 
that make up human attitudes and behavior. We can see in this student reciprocity 
of tiliuational opportunities, and interchange ot culture, a long, but sure road to 
international understanding and amity. It may be that after all this ruling on the 
|)art of the I )e|)artnient of Labor will not be serious in its consecpiences. since it may 
be likeU that few of the foreign studt iits will be reduced to the necessity of finding 
emploN iiirnt. Nevertheless, we ojipox' the nuMsiire as being unwarranted, incon- 
sider.ite, and producti\c of ini^imiiirsl.indiiig. It i^ the intention that we deprecate, 
rather than the tangible ,i< t it-i It. 

THE .VITACK ON A LIBERAL UNIVERSITY 

rii.ii the propaganda ot the so-c.illed "liber,d>" i> not universally favored in 
edni .moii.il ( ir( lc>. i- -l.own by the li\el\ |m "H-t .it n i!> of the people of North 

(Continued on Page 4) 



.\ freshman wanted to go to the In- 
formal last Friday so he asked one of 
his fraternity brothers to fix him up in 
the way of a date. "Sure," replied the 
obliging brother, "call up 9(M'. and ask for 
.Molly, tell her I told you to call her ui)." 
After borrowing a ni( kel the unsuspecting 
one i)honed and this conversiition fol- 
lowed : 

R-i-n-g, B-r-i-n-g. 

Central: "Nahumber paleese." 

'SB: "IMMi." 

Other end: "Hello." 

'•M\: "Hello, is this '.KMi?" 

O.E.: "Yeah, whatcha want?" 

';}(•.: "Well, is Molly there?" 

O.E.: "Molly? Course she's here." 

':«•): "May I speak to her?" 

O.E.: "Speak to her! Say, buddy, are 
vou trying to ked me? Molly is in her 
stall." 

•:}(>: "Stall? Who— why— where are 

you?" 

O.E.: "Who? The Cavalry Stables!" 

ss — — 

( )ld class heroes fall and new ones arise- 
on Razoo night. . . There was a gentle- 
man's agreement between the contest- 
ants of one of the boxing bouts not to 
inflict serious damage up<m each other's 
mugs. . . More Heidelberg traditions 
gone to pot. . . .Animal instincts appear 
an<l are felt on RazfM) night. . . This is 
the first time in many years that a 
sophomore class has beaten the freshmen 
on Razoo night. . . The freshmen greatly 
outnumbered the sophs and could easily 




THE STUDENT AS A THINKER 



luive overpowered them but something 
in the appearance of the few reckless 
sophs kept the gentle freshmen at a 
respectable distance. 

ss 

It is called the f.O-man rope-pull but 
there is yet to be tU) men on a side. . . 
W hoever bought the roi)e made sure that 
it would not fail them next year or a 
good many years to come. . . The (|uick 
way in which the sophs went through the 
pond brought memories of the old 
swimming hole. . . It was the biggest 
haul of fish from the iiond in two years. 
The manner in which the freshmen 
dragged the sophomores gave one the 
impression that they were hauling new 
specimens to the Zoology building. . . 
Hut in spite of all their pulling the 
island is still there . . There are a few 
sophs boasting of the fact that they did 
not go all the way through the pond. . . 
Good old Schultz made his appearance 
after the Rupe-pull. 

- — ■ — ss 

Dr. De Silva brought half of a human 
brain to one of his ])sychology lectures. 
Dr. De Silva said that the brain was 
three quarters normal size — evidently it 
belongs to a sophomore and he does not 
miss it. 



ss 

Coach Taube invented a spelling game 
for the football squad to pass the time 
away on long trips on the bus. He cer- 
tainly was surprised to hear some of the 
spelling of his men. For instance, 
maestro was spelled m-y-s-t-e-r; accel- 
eration, axelleration; zephyr, zeppir; 
pseudonym, psudenim, etc. 
ss- 

F"igure out this headline from the 
Wesleyan Arf,us — 

DRAM AT SCUTS CALLED. 
- — ss^ 

A left-over from last spring. \ promi- 
nent track man had taken an unusual 
number of class cuts. One day he took 
a cut in order to go up to his fraternity 
to see if there was any mail for him — 
there was— a letter from the Dean's 
office warning him not to take any more 
cuts. 

■ ss 

.\ group of B.U. students discovered 
thai the section of a newspaper which is 
most popular is the comic section, the 
low-brow "funnies." The editorial section 
ranked fourth. The rcaso.i is that while 
it takes some intelligence to read the 
editorials, anyone from '.^ to 9o can read 
and enjoy the "funnies." 
ss 

No! the sophomores were not born 
that way, nor do all of them ride barrels, 
it is just the beginning of the riding 
classes — and nothing can be done ahoiil it. 



-ss- 



The Outing Club came upon a curious 
sight last Sunday. A group of co-eds 
were trying to climb Mt. Toby bare- 
footed. Just a bunch of mountain 
nymjihs. 



The Predicament of the Freshman 

It is often said that college students do 
not think, or do not think for themselves. 
This is no doubt true of many. but. to 
speak the vernacular, "why pick on 
college students"? The disease of not 
thinking when it can be avoided is so 
prevalent in all human society that it 
seems sometimes rather untluly cari)ing 
to charge it against busy students in 
college. Yet is there not a justification 
for this, in that it is in college that men 
are supposed to learn to think, for them- 
selves? Some years ago a Western 
college magazine contained an article 
that explained in a remarkably clear way 
what happens with most boys and girls 
who enter college. For a dozen or more 
years before they reach coflege these 
pupils have been steadily told to trust 
all their teachers, in school, in church, 
and in the home, and to a large extent 
they must do so. It is true that at the. 
present time there is much spirit of 
revolt in the air. which leads some boys 
to distrust some of their teaching, but 
against that must be set the tremendous 
disinclination of most human beings of 
any age to take needless exertion, assume 
responsibility that they can avoid, or 
run risk of ridicule. All these powerful 
motives tend to hold a pupil, or a boy 
or girl of school age, in the herd, gently 
following instruction, and believing with- 
out much <|uestion or iloubt most of 
what he is told. 

When the stmlent arrives at the 
enhanced dignity of his freshman year, 
however, a new and disturbing element 
enters his mind, producing upheavals, 
psychological earthquakes, and some- 
times much pain with or without ac- 
companying benefit. These upheavals 
come because the trusting freshman dis- 
covers that in college, where he ex|>ected 
to find greater certainty and wis<lom 
than in his prep school there is divergence 
of oi)inion. and many things which he 
was taught before as certain, generalh' 
agretd upon, or even sacred, are dis- 
paraged, (juestioned, or even ridicule»l 
by some element of his new surroundings, 
either faculty or fellow students. Natural- 
ly this produces protest, and, if the 
freshman has considerable courage, he 
protests loudly. Naturally, also, he is 
then "given the works." by many of his 
fellows, a id by some instructors. Who 
wants to know what a freshman thinks, 
anyhow? Let him be seen, if necessary, 
but not heard, like virtuous children of 
a former era. 

Ridicule as an Impetus to Thinking 
Ridicule is a powerful weapon, and in 
many cases the freshman. e\en if his 
views were all correct, would not be able 
to make a good defense of them against 
the ritlicule he must meet. Many ol(!e.- 
men could not. Hence the freshman 
crawls into his shell, learns the silent 
wisdom of the serpent, and begins to 
cultivate poise, a blase manner, and lay 
claim to possessing philosophic sus|ien- 
sion of judgment, or to using simply the 
scientific method, which leaves every- 
thing in the realm of probability, subject 
to constant revision, and to be accci)ted 
only on reference to duly established 
authority. -\ favorite form of this excuse 
for not thinking, sadly prevalent in some 
groups here, is that one has done some 
powerful thinking when he has cast aside 
a set of ideas taught him in childhood 
or youth, and adopted another in college. 
.Acquiring better powers of expression 
as he goes through the classes, a senior 
may be able to dispense almost entirely 
with thinking, but meanwhile preserve a 
dignified exterior, and, to use the ver- 
nacular again, "throw a warm line." 
which would almost deceive angels. 

This system saves the maximum 
amount of labor and trouble. i)ermitting 
the passing of examinations with fluency 
and parrot-like accuracy, but it need 
hardly be said that it does not lead tu 
learning to think, and commonly painful 
exjiericnces await the adept when he 
encounters the cold and cynical world 
outside the academic life. Of course he 
may succeed in getting into some pro- 
fession or job where a good bluff will go 
a long way, but even such jobs have an 
unpleasant way of blowing up like a toy 



EXIIIBITION OF ETCHINGS 
(Continued from Pag* 1) 

he was very fond of portraying in 
work. One of his most famous etch 
"The Toast," is on exhibition in 
(oUection. Zorn reveals a mast. 
.irtistry in the striking firmness oi 
lines and in the tielicacy of his sliu' 
Benson takes his inspiration from si 
commong to the coast of Massachu- 
one of which he has recorded in , 
"Bound Home," another excellent etching 
in this array. 

Frank Brangwyn is another artist of 
note represented in this display. !!i, 
works also are well worthy of sti 
Other prints show the work of T. !,. 
Lorain, Alfred Hutley, James M(l..\ 
and William Wolcott. 



DR. FRAKER FORMERLY 

TAUGHT IN PHILIPPINis 
(Continued from Page 1) 

these old tongues having disappeand. 
In the schools, the teachers are for iht 
most part natives. Americans how. , r 
hold the key positions in all schools ml 
colleges." 

Sports are for the most part stridly 
.American, Dr. Fraker said. Baseball is 
played almost as much as in Ameri<.i. 
and the teams show as good ability. In 
addition to sports the United States ll;l^ 
introduced sanitation, rapid communi- 
cation, and other advantages all of whi<h 
have been quickly adopted by the 
Fili|)inos. 

After leaving the Philippines. Professor 
Fraker taught French and Spanish ,it 
Northwestern University und Harvard 
College. 



balloon, especially in times of need or 
stress. For the ultimate discomfort thii 
can arise, enquirers may be referred to 
Kijiling's poem "Tomlinson." which is 
worth careful study by any one,- with 
enjoNuient. 

Man Must Think for Himself 
The fact is that in the bumpy jouni.y 
of life we cannot take our parents, our 
l)(K)ks, or our teachers along. We really 
must have something in our own heads, 
and must be able to defend these nieiu:'.! 
l)ossessions by that form of skill which i> 
known as thinking. But, cries the irri 
tated students, "We cannot take time to 
()uestion all we see in print, or hear in 
classrocmis." No, probably not, hut 
George Ade tells of a man who w.i- 
kicke<l on the head by a mule when ht 
was young, and during the rest of his 
life believed all that he read in the neuv 
papers. Unfortunately teachers and books 
ditfer among themselves, and the task of 
discriminating and deciding for ourstlvt- 
which we shall In-lieve falls upon us. and 
we cannot, if we intend to stand on our 
own feet and face our fellow men. do'l^e 
or delegate this entirely. 

If a man is called upon to do jury duty, 
as many of us must sooner or later, he 
will be expected to judge of the reliability 
of facts, and to relate them logically into 
credible groups or ideas. The purpose ot 
all court procedure, on which depends 
the reputation, the property anti the 
lives of the litigants, is to elicit the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing hut 
the truth, and it is assumed that mv 
sane and impartial man is competent t" 
do this as a member of the jury, aided 
by the officers of the court. Thi- a'^- 
sumption appears ck-arly in the ion- 
stantly reiterated phrase that everything; 
must be "proved beyond a reason i hit- 
doubt," since reason is obviously v«>- 
sesseil by every sane man. This art ol 
judging the reliability of witnesses, and 
hence of facts, and relating them i"'" 
systems or theories is in short the .iri "' 
thinking, and it is the same in < ■ -' 
as in the jury box, and the san < 1"^ 
philosophy, literature, history, or sn- nre 
as for the sordid details of a crime And 
the responsibility in all cases is s-i'' '•[; 
since a man's conduct, by which h- ^v'- 
be judged, results simply from hi.-^ - i^^; 
ment of the facts of life, and no Jib: 
nor excuse, nor reference to the te;)< ni.- 
of others, will in the long run re 
man of this responsibility of thinkii s '^'"^ 
himself. 

M.S.C. appeals to no one - 
people, but represents the whole ■ «""• 
munity impartially, and hence dot- net 
aim at covering the typical student -.vii 
a veneer of social pose or elegani thm 
culture. May we not hope that i" 
a healthy and sober environme- ' 
invaluable art of thinking for 
may increase in popularity, or 

in amount? 

A 



th!- 



THK MASSACIll SETTS C()LLF(;i.\N, TIIIRSDAY. OCTOBER 6, IW2 



^ 



SPORTS 



^ 



^ 



Booters Open 
W. P. I. 



With 
Saturday 



4 BRIEF HISTORY OF 

SOCCER AT M.S.C. 

tulusive to the Massachusetts 
Collegian 



s,, >cr was first started on the Mass. 
St.ite I ampus during the Fall of "29. At 
th.it time, several boys who wanted to 
ol.iy the game decided that with the co- 
,,,,i.r,iiion of Coach Larry Briggs and the 
l>l,\,i(.il Etiucation department, they 
would try out the possibilities of having 

a tc.un. 

Maurice Suher of Holyoke, who hail 
played the game previously, was elected 
t.iot.iin of the first team, which was 
known as the "Yellow Jackets," because 
,,1 striiiLfl yellow shirts that were worn. 
Anyone interested may see those his- 
torically famous garments being worn by 
the present goalies.) 

During the first season of play only 
one intercollegiate game was scheduled. 
That iiAme was playetl with Connecticut 
A'gies at Storrs on November 21. and 
asulted in a 2-2 tie. Other games were 
pl.iveil with local high scho<jls and prep 
schools, most of the results being losses 
lor our tirst soccer squad. Hasthampton 
llik;h, Deerfield seconds. Hopkins and 
.S].rini;fuld J. V's were on the list. 

The fall of 'W saw the first organized. 
ri.oi;ni/.ed intercollegiate soccer team at 
M.i-,>.irhusetts. Jack Northcott was cap- 
t.nu of that club, and a five game sched- 
ule was arranged. While score results 
dill not appear too promising, as the 
team lost 4, and won 1. several gotxl men 
ftere developed, and stxrcer was given a 
risjHM table berth. 

Frost, the best outside left forward 
th.it the State squad has ever had. was 
divt loped during the season of iy;{0. and 
many of the men who were to make up 
the undefeated UKU Club were gaining 
hcnelicial experience. Jorczak, Pruync. 
Wiskiewicz, Hitchcock, and Shuman 
played that year. 

The I'.KJO schedule was as follows: 

W.IM. .'), Mass. State 0; .Amherst ."), 
M i^s. State 0; Springfield J. \'s 5, 
.Mj,s. State 0; M.l.T. .i, Mass. State U; 
Gmiarticut Aggie 0, Mass. State 4. 

The victory over C.A.C. in hY.V), 
marked the beginning of a string of wins 
that has not been broken since. 

It is not necessary to go through the 
l''ol season in detail. A two year ohi 

I team wi.nt through a stiff schedule and 

I (merged entirely victorious. In defeating 
Amherst College, they broke a two year 

Iwninink; streak for the Sabrinas. They 
dtfiatid the champions of ' the Little 
Three hy overcoming Wesleyan. They 
del eat td C..A.C. for the second con sec u- 

|tive y< ir. The members of the team 



OPENING GAME TO BE 
PLAYED AT WORCESTER 

Larry Brigg's State Booters meet 
W.IM. at Worcester on S.iturday , Odober 
S, for the opening game of a stiff schedule. 
The result of the encounter should add 
another victory to the long string that 
the State team already has. 

Worcester Tech opened their season 
last_ Siiturday in an encounter with 
.Amherst College. The Sabrinas won over 
the ICngiiieers with a score of .'S-O. How- 
ever, for some unaccountable reason, 
Sanderson, the brilliant outside right 
forward of the Tech team, tliil not play . 
If he does play this coming Saturday, 
the State Booters will ha\e to stand for 
some stitTer competition than that which 
faced .Amherst. 

Whittuin the center halfback for the 
opjionents' team is by far their best 
baikheld player, antl while he shows 
many faults, he is a powerful booter. 
The rest of the Tech team can best be 
rated by the statement that only one 
sfjuad letternian was lost through gradu- 
ation. 

State's Maroon ami White booters 
have eight lettermen on the sijuad; they 
have a shifty line; they have a com- 
binatiim that should be able to get 
around the Engineer's defense; and they 
have better backs than their opponents 
have. 

On the whole, in spite of W.P.I.'s 
sui>eriority in experience. State shoulil 
m.irk uj) another victory. The probabU' 
line-ups are: 

Mass. .Stale 

Forwards — MacWimiuif. Taft, JaL-ksoii, Koslowski. 

K<Tn.stein, Uowli-r. 
Hal(l).icks— I'niym-. Talliot. Landsman. Sluinian, 

BUu'klmrii. Packard. 
l'"iilll)aiks — Hodsilon, IVasf, CowinK. 
Goalies — Uobbic, llutiran. 

W. P. I. 
Forwards — \Jonks. lIuiiiUK-r, Lyman, Luce, Brand. 

Simlernon. 
Ilalfliacks — Sfiumski. Whiltiim, Tripoli. 
Fulll)aik»— Allen. Hebcl 
(ioalit. — Sarueant. 



were: 

Coal. Jorczak; rfb. Connell; Ifb. 
Cowing; rhb. Shuman; chb. Pruyne; 
Ihb. Hitchcixk; orf, Forest; irf. Was- 
kiewicz; cf, Jackson; irf. Taft; orf, 
Mackimmie; substitutes, Ibxlsrlon, Koz- 
lowski, Warren, and Talbot. 

This club scored l.'J points to their 
opjKjnents 3, and set a mark that will be 
hard to repeat. The lit.'J2 seasrm starts 
its record this .Siiturday at Worcester. 
To gain some idea as to what this team 
has to face, the following are scores of 
games won by their op|)onents last 
Saturday: 

Fitchburg Normal o. Tufts 1 ; Conn. 
Aggies 5, St. Stephens 1 ; Amherst .'5. 
W.P.I. 0. 



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SPORTS (:.\LEM>AR 

Wi'ilneHduy, Oeluher S 

liitiili.iltinils- n.iims toui'li IimiiImII. 

>iK>fr. .tint ^v^illlllliuK — Kainia Sin!:,i 
v>. .Miilia i'lannii.i Kho 
Ttiursduy. October b 

liilii ii,il<-iim\ n.imca — Alpha Sii;iiia vs 
Tli.t.i ( lii 
Kridu.v. Oelohvr 7 

Imiiii.iii-iiiity liatnes — t.*T.\'. vs. Kaiip.i 
Si«ni,i 
Suturduy, OcCuher K 

\ .ii-ity |o<iil>all Miildli-liury at .Miilillcliiiiv 
\ .ir.Mlv siKiir \\ MM. at Worcester 
Tuetiday. October II 

Inti-ttt.itfinity Kami's — I^imltila Clii vs. 
M^ma IMii Kp.siJDii 
ThurHduy, October li 

liiuilrati-tnily naiiif* I'lii Sinnia Ka|>;>.i 
\ s. .Mplia Simna I'lii 



•$*<{^<{^«{^<$*4'^*^*^^*<^*i^*<^ 



^ Zbnx tbc Idiot l5olc 'f 

Co.ist * iiKird and Worcester Teih 
played to .i scoreless tie l.ist S.iturday. 



The Middlebury game slioulil be a 
great battle. Tufts, regarded by m.iny 
as having the strongest team it has had 
in years, only defeated the \ ermonters 
'.to last week. 

Don Mason, captain of last year's 
<Toss-country te.im. and \.irsity re<'ord 
holder, will co.ich the freshman harriers 
this year. 

The cross-country team opens its sea- 
son with Tufts in two weeks. Hob 
Murray, a sophomore, who holds the 
rcKird for the State course has made the 
fastest time in the trials this year. 



Fraternity Athletics 
Open for Fal 



erm 



Interfraternity sports for the fall term 
consist of swimming, soccer, and touch 
football. The swimming te.niis from each 
fr.iteriiity are (i)m|)os«(| tit four men, 
while the soccer ami football teams have 
six men e.ich. Points for entering teams 
as well as for winning games will be given 
this year to the houses. All {Miints go 
(Continued on Puite 4, Column 3) 



IDA M. BRIDGEMAN 

dratluatc of New Lngland Conservatory 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORtiAN 
123 Main .St. Tel. tiT-J Amherst, Mass. 



S. S. HYDE 

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State Loses to Bowdoin 

Plays at Middlebury Next 



MAINE TEAM PROVES 
TOO BIG FOR STATE 



Mel T.iube's M.iss,u hlisetts St.ite Cal 
lege tootb.dl elestii was defeated b>' a 
heavy and hard-6ghting H«»w<loin College 
te.im in a st.irlling upset on Whitlitr 
lieldat Urunsuick, M.iiiie. last Siiturd.iy, 
2l)ti. Although State defeated CtK)per 
I iiion riO-O in its opening g.ime, the 
M.issachusetts athletes pro\t'd no m.iti h 
for the Pol.ir Me.irs. 

Ht>wdoiii relied almost entirely on line 
|iluiiging, end ruiming and |>ower-pla\ 
football to overwhelm the MariH)n and 
White eleven. They trietl but one for- 
ward jiass in their drives down the field 
for touchdowns. Mass.ichusetts State 
attempted ele\t'n passes and ct»mi)leted 
but four in its efforts to cross the Howdoin 
go.il line. 

The game was a test of twt» noted 
footb.dl s>stems, the Warner double 
wing back, |)ower j)lay system, used b\ 
the Mowdoin team. pr<)\ing superif)r to 
the RiH'kne sl\le of fooib.ill pla>cd by 
the Massiichusetts eleven. The .Maine 
team stojiped the chief .M.issat luiset t s 
thre.if, I.oiiis Hush; the shifty .Maroon 
.Old White halfback being able to score 
but one toiK lidown. The Pol.ir Hear line 
was much too heavy .ind too powerliil 
for the State players to penetr.ite and 
the power pl.i> s of the Maine eleven tore 
huge holes in the M.issachusetts line. 
However, the M.iroon and White eh>ven 
playetl great ftKHball. and, but for three 
costly fumbles, width led to Howdoin 
tout hdovMis. htid the M.iiiie te.im evtii. 

Howiloin openetl the ctintesl with a 
rush, ami forted State to punt from its 
goal line. The Maine te.mi rettivtd the 
ball on its .'lO-vard line and marched 
down the field for a touchdown; Richanl 
M)n storing. Later Friv;ard fumbled ne.ir 
till go.il line, anti iiubb.ird toi>k the b.ill 
iner for the touchthiwn. In the third 
period Hush fiimbletl anil Howiloin re 
( overetl the ball. .After a strong march 
flown the fielil, Richardson again sttiretl. 

In the last period I.ojko recoveretl a 
Howdoin fumble near the .St.ite goal line. 
.•\n ext haiige t>f punts placeil the bail on 
the Howdoin liH-yard line; a long pas> 
to Hush frtim White, ami a short plunge 
by Hush St Dreil the only Massiichusetts 
State tf>ui lidown. C.iptain I.eary. I.eavilt. 
antl Ryan featureij m the line for llie 
Maroon ami White, while Hush .ind 
Sheff tlitl the best wtirk in the St.ite 
b.K kfieltl. The summary: 



VERMONTERS POSSESS 

STRONG DEFENSE 

The Mass.it husetts State College ftH>t- 
ball te.im will meet an ancient rival next 
S.iturd.iy, Oi tober S, when it plays a 
strong Mitldlebury College eleven .it 
Middlebury, \ermont. for its thirtl con- 
test ol the season. 

The M.iroon .md While elt\eii tle- 
feateil Midtllebury last year in an easy 
\ it lory, .'12 fi, but the gime next .S.itiir- 
tlay is expet tetl to be a ililhciilt struggle. 
Middlebury ilisplayed a great wealth t)f 
line power and some excellent bit kfieltl 
men in the g.ime with Tufts last .S.iiur- 
tl.iy, when the Wrimmt team lost a close 
ttiiitesi to the Jumbo eleven, !l-0. 

Willi .Steve llo\le. leatling scorer last 
season for the P.intlier eleven back in 
the game, after an injury, the Miilillebury 
ctnnbine will be of full sirength. Two 
otiiir Midtllebury stars are the powtrful 
tatkle, \ic Riccio, and Antly Amlerson, 
rtgul.ir fullb.irk. W.illv Hoelim, star ball 
i.irrier on the I'.t.ll fieshni.in te.im. .it 
hallb.uk piisilion will be reaily to take 
Movie's pl.itf if the star h.ilfbai k re- 
teives further injury. The rest of thf 
Wrmonters' batklielil will inclutle Veo- 
m.in at tpi. trier, ll.irtrey at left h.ilf, 
while Stef.iiii.ik, .mother sophomore, is a 
liktly reserve for the fiillbat k position. 
Coach Mel Taube of the State team was 
somewhat tlisapjiointetl with Ihe work of 
his ch.irgfs in last Saliinl.iy's fray. .iihI 
has tirilletl them intensively iliiring prac- 
tice sessions t liroiighiiut the Wfek. 

The probable line iips: 

MuHiiai'huH«lta Slate Middlebury 

Kv.iii, tc 
( iliiniiiiiK!!, It 
Sili!M)ii. ru 
I .11)1. I^Mry. i: 
I.eavilt. Ik 
t iiiiiiiiinK, It 
Miiiinlalii, li- 
UJKi-l'iw. (|l> 
ilie.|i, fill) 
Slielt. Ilili 
I-tigard, fb 



le. Kri.l 
It, t .||>I .Ml I^MII 
Ik, l.<>vell 

c , I (llliH!) 

m. Wiiitlit 

It. Kii t iu 

le. SoreilM-il 

1 1 It. Vetmiiiiiii 

till). Iliiyle 

llili. ILirlrey 

ll>. Aiiilerw)!! 



Masa. .Stale 

re, Kyan 
II. CiiiiiiiiiiiK^, Muitiull 



Bowdoin 

l);ivl-*. Kelley, le 

\j>w. It 

Ai ketniaii. .Nasoii. 'k 

lit, Sil.soii, Nietu|>f<ki. Birltfftrtl 
Mi:iiken, c ,. I^ary 

Torrey, Archihalil. m Ik. I.ravitt, Burke 

Ml Keiiiiey. W.iile, UiriiiK, rt It, SieverH. tltitVm 
Kent. Sattcenl. re 
Kurilell, .|b 

HiikaiMJUsky, Keiil. Hit) 
lliil<l>.iril. rhi) 
Kit liardwin. fit 

.Sure: Bowiloiii L'u, .Massac liiiwtts Stale f. 
Tom lidiiwrn*. Kii liardson 1>, lliihlmrd, Buali. 
tkials followinK loin lidowns. Biirdell 2. Referee. 
I'. .\. SwalFii-ld. .S|iriiiulield. I'mplre. T. K. 
S ,'inlon, BiMtiiii. Head line-iniun. Newman 
VoiiiiK. Maine Field iiidKe. J. J, Biitlvr, Catliolk' 
I 'niveriiily. Time. I.Viiiiiiiile i|ii.>rler4. 



le, .Moiiiitaiii 

ill. ItiKelow, l^>|ku 

rlili. Muili 

ll.l.. Slietf. While 

fb. KriKard. C<i|>lirii 



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THOMAS^?^^V¥AtSH 



EDITORIALS 
(Continued from Paft* 3) 

Carolina, wli.) nsi-nt the appoaraiue of sucl. avowed "liberals" as Bert ran.l Russell, 
iMinlish lecturer and writer. The movement cannot fail to interest, because it shows 
the citizens of the state in a new role that of the taxpayers of the state expressing 
dissatisfaction with the educational policy of the state university. 

"The University of North Carolina, which in the last few years has come to be 
known in this country an<l abroa.l as one of the most liberal state e.lucational in- 
stitutions in the United States, has been attacked on this very ground by a i^roup 
of about KM) prominent North Canjlinians. 

"The uroup this month sent a plea to C.ov. (). Max C.ardner of North Carolina, 
asking iiim to "save our state from further predatory acts by these so-called modern 
educators against 'things of the spirit.' " The petition asked the governor to oust 
"the undesirables at our tax-supported institutions of learning." "We are not 
attacking . . . the university," the petition continued. "On the contrary we are 
rallying to the defense thereof to prevent further poisoning by the enemy of those 
now attending or who mav hereafter attend." 

"Stu.lent publications at the university, the i)rotesting UK) siiid, "are straws that 
show whither the wind is blowing— toward Moscow, and whence it is coming— the 
class roonis." Appearance at the university and the North Carolina College for 
Women of Bertrand Russell, British pliilos.,pher, an<l l.ang<lon Hughes, Negro poet, 
was condennied. Russell's philosophy was .lesrribed as "the incarnation of paganisni, 
dressed up in inveigling and seductive non-Biblical terms, and properly branded as 

neopaganism." . ^ ^ 

"C.ov Cardner indicated that he would not do anything about it except to turn 
the petition over to university's board of trustees. Dr. Frank Craham. president 
of the university, had no comment to make for publication."- I. P. 



FRATERNITY ATHLETICS 

OPEN FOR FALL TERM 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 

toward the Interfraternity Cup, which is 
given to the fraternity having the highest 
s<()re in athletic, scholastic, and aca- 
demic acti\ ities. 

Athletic rules for interfraternity com- 
petition are as follows: 

1. \arsity s<iuad men are not eligible 
for intramural competition during the 
term. 

a) Varsity s(|uads shall consist of: 



SOPHOMORES VICTORIOUS 

OVER FROSIl RAZOO NIGHT 
(Contlnuad from Paft* 1) 

Charles Daniels ':ii> defeated Albert 
D(Mlge '.•{(■). Paul Mandella "M outboxed 
Ralph C.erauld '.{.') to give the freshmen 
their first victory in the fifth match. In 
the sixth match, wrestling, John Bailey 
'•.i'} won over Kdward Soulliere "M>. The 
last contest was another wrestling match 
in which Arthur Stuart ':«> defeated 
Everett MacUuestion ';{.">. 

At the end of the matihes. President 
llouran of the Senate announced the 
rules under which the Night Shirt <<)n- 
test would take place. He explained the 
rules in detail as to pi)ints, time, methcxl, 
etc. When he concluded, the Parade 
began. The freshmen in single file passed 
thrrmgh a double line of sophomores then 
ran to the field. In tiie pit the .Senate 
gave final instructions .ind the signal was 
given for the melee. When the contest 
was finished the Sinate counted shirts 
and the men, tleclaring that the sopho- 
mores were victorious. The class of UKi.T 
had destroyed 77 shirts and captured 20 
freshmen. The class of VX\*'> had retained 
24 shirts and cajUured only 13 sopho- 
mores. The final score was freshmen 5() 
and sophomores 117. 



MOUNTAIN DAY RE-ESTABLISHED 
(Contlnuod from Paft* 1) 

by various contests and a speech by 
Dean Burns — for what was Mountain 
Day without Dean Burns? Such a 
Mountain Day was last held t)ctober 17, 
l<»2i» and since then a campaign has been 
underway to revive the custom. 

The following plan of the day has been 
decided upon: On arriving at Mt. Toby, 
the hikers will be met by members of the 
Outing Club who will act as gui<les t«) 
conduct parties up the Sugar Camp 
Trail, Long Plain Trail, Wo<Klbur\'s 
Trail, and Roaring Br(M)k Trail. There 
will be many points of interest to be 
shown, crawled through, climbe<l up, 
and scrambled down the Caves. Mt. 
Toby Falls, the many stretches of wocxl- 
iand s<enery. and last, the view from the 
Mt. Toby fire-tower. The tower has an 
elevation of 12;{."> feet and if the atmos- 
phere is clear, a view will be had of parts 
of four states as well as the Connecticut 
\'alle\. Forrest Crawford ".V.i, who has 
charge of the arrangements, has promised 
a log chopping contest, as well as <Jther 
features j)f the old time program. 

If enough interest is shown by the 
students on the coming occasion, it is 
ex|)ecte(l that not only will Mountain 
Day be re-established, but it will be 
announced only by the tolling of the 
cha|H"l Ih'II. 



M.S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

''Let Dave do it'' 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



Typing 
First Class Work Low Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



Everything in Hardware 

and Radio Equipment 



=PHILCO= 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



1. Football 25-.'i5 men 

2. Cross-country 12-22 men 
:{. Soccer lX-2."> men 
4. Winter track ;i()-2.'j men 
n. Hockey 12 men 
r». Basketball 12-1.') men 

7. Spring track ."50 men 

8. liaseball I.VIH men 

b) Men who have been dropped from 
the varsity stjuad because of ineligi- 
bility in their scholastic work shall not 
be allowed to compete in any intra- 
mural activities for that term. 

c) Any man dro])iHHl from the varsity 
squad for infractions of rules will not 
be eligible for intramural activities for 
the term. 

d) Any freshmen s(|uad men are sub- 
ject to ineligibility upon the request 
of the coach of any resiwctive freshmen 
sport . 

e) A man is not eligible to conifiete in 
any interfraternity sport in which he 
has ever won a \'arsity letter. 

2. Fraternity pledges may participate 
in intramural competition. 

.'5. Any team using an ineligble man 
will automatically forfeit the game. 

4. There will be no postponed games 
without the sanction of the Physical 
E<lu<ation department. 

.5. A man may participate in only one 
sport per night. 

(■>. Any team not ready to j)lay within 
five minutes of the time scheduled shall 
forfeit the game to opponents. If both 
teams scheduled to play fail to appear. 



DRIVE FOR ME.MBERS 

FROM OCTOBER 10-15 

(Continued from Paft* 1) 

artists in America and can secure all 
inde|)endent artists if they are desired. 

Amherst College has generously do- 
nated the use of College Hall to the 
Assm-iation. This gift by saving the 
Association money increases the working 
fund enabling higher priced artists to be 
secured. Promising a well-balanced pro- 
gram Professor Waugh said that there 
would perhaps be a violinist or a string 
(juartet, a pianist, and a vocal artis^t or 
choral grouj). He pointed out that the 
Springfield Association had procured 
Lawrence Tibbett, Metropolitan Opera 
star, for October 14. Albert Spaukling. 
one of the greatest violinists in America, 
and Harold Bauer, an equally gifted 
pianist, will complete the Springfield 
program. 

Because of the success attending last 
year's Concert Series, a larger enrollment 
is expected this year. Membershij) in the 
.\ssociation is necessary for anyone who 
wishes to attend any or all of these 
concerts, since no tickets are sold for 
any of these concerts. 

The officers of the Amherst Com- 
munity Concert Association are: Pro- 
fessor Frank A. Waugh, president; Dr. 
L. N. Durgin, secretary; Mr. P. N. 
Nestle, treasurer; and Mrs. F. C. Pray, 
chairman of the campaign committee. 
During the week of the campaign to 
secure members, Mr. Williams' office in 
the Memorial Building will be open to 
give information concerning the concerts 
and to sell membership cards to anyone 
who wishes to purchase one. 



row Wilson summered. Further . i tht 
couple came to Mount Rydal hj,)^ 
later became their home for forty lars 
They walked around the Rydal \ .u^-r 
by the Wishing Gate and John's r,r,j^j. 
until they came to Grasmere when thn 
lived in a home called The In/vcs 
Cottage. 

Professor Rand has studied at \ ,,„„, 
intervals during the past years in tlit 
very heart of the Lake Countrx ||,. 
followed the identical path that Wunls- 
worth took, and which he desi iil,e,j 
Professor Rand says: "After a hiiii(lri,| 
and fifty years, the nature of that lountrv 
has changed very little. Thouuii the 
villages have grown larger, some of the 
streets therein seemed not to hav^ 
changed one iota during all these Nt-ar, 
The detailed account of this wall; 
comes from Dorothy's journal whii h she 
kept every day. and in which she faith- 
fully recorded all hap])enings. .S)ine uf 
Wortlsworth's poems which are con- 
nected with this particular journev wirt 
referred to by Professor Rand. Ihese 
were: The Cock is Crou'ing which Word*. 
worth wrote at Brother's Water while | 
waiting for Dorothy and The Glm^- Wurir. 
written the Monday previous to Dorothy'i 
Good Friday, and which Dorothy rwited 
as they walked along. 



A ^ HERS 



Thurs. October 6 

J(»an Blontleil 
Kric Linden — K\alyn Knajip in 

"BIG CITY BLUES" 



ILLUSTRATED LECTURE 

SHOWS LAKE COUNTRY 

(Continued from Pafte I ) 

at Brother's Water, a hamlet in the 
mountains. One biographer of Words- 
worth believes th.it Lucey. the heroine 
of so many of Wordsworth's poems, lived 
in this mf)untainous village. 

From Brother's Water they continued 
over the Kirkstone path along an old 
Roman roa<l w hence they came to .Amble- 
side. Then they went on to Rotha near 
which Wordsworth's son lived and Wo(mI- 



Friday. October 7 

Walter Huston— Kay Johnson 
Constance Cummings — Pat O'Brien 

in "AMERICAN MADNESS" 



Saturday. Oct. 8 

ADOLPHE MENJOC 
Mayo Meth( t — Skeets Gallagher 

in "NIGHT CLUB LADY" 

From the sensational Thatcher Colt Myster>- 

No\rl 

Mcn.-Tues.. Oct. lO-lt 

(;e()R(;e ARLiss 

in "A SUCCESSFUL 

CALAMITY" 

Wednesday. Oct. 12 

Lee TracN — Barbara Weeks 
Eugene Pallette — tvalyn Knapp 

in "NIGHT MAYOR" 



both shall be gi\en a loss and no such 
g.imes shall be reschedukMl. 

7. Alt protests must be hied within 
24 hours with Mr. Briggs in the Physital 
Education department. 



PROF. KELLOGG COMES 

TO M.S.C. FROM CHINA 
(Continued from Page 1) 

the soldier, the business man, or politic Ian 
This idea is carried even into government 
Since !MM) A.D. the civil service system 
has been in use to fill government i)osi- 
tions in order that only the intellectuals 
shall rule. Should an exceptional student 
be born and educated in a small to»n 
where educational advantages are nieaKtr, 
the village raises money and sends hira 
off to higher centers of learning and from 
then on bo;>sts of its protege." 

Fukien I'niversity is in Foochow, whnh 
is located in southern China. Courses in 
this school are taught io English and the 
Bathelor of .-\rts degree is gi\»-ii. Kukien 
graduates usually come to this coiimn 
to further their education, an<l then re- 
turn to take positions in their own s4hiH)l, 

Professor Kellogg came from Chiii.i m 
VXW and was connectetl with the rni\er- 
sity of Mar\lan<l until he came hire :n 
Januarv of this year. 



Wait until the i)acifists get hold of the 
fact that over one-half of the "-tinknt 
body of this college is taking milit;irv 
training. 



ALL WOOL BLANKETS- PASTLL COLORS 
$2.95 each 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST, MASS. 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, • MASS. 



Ha\ e you tried 
A SCOTCHMEN'S OMELET 

Served only at 

BUCK DEADY'S? 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REI'.\IR1N<. AND ALL KINDS OK 
WASHING DONE.\T RE.\SONABLE I'RICES 

( )«»■ Laundry First Class 

Our I'olicy Guarantied 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



Feels great to have your hair 
shampooed after a haircut! 

The College Barber Shop 

••M" BUILDING 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



COME OVER TO 'HAMP 

for your Fall Riding Clothes and Sport Wear! 

Full Line of Ladies' and Men's Riding Breeches, Boots, Crops, 
Jackets and Coats. Extremely Low Prices for 
Massachusetts Students -See Us. 

COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHl N 



''The finest eating place in Amherst" 

SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 

INCORPOR.\TED 




4' 

^ A CURRENT EVENT 

IN TIIE COLLEGIAN 

'V The Collegian reftreu to 
^ announce the resignation 
^ of JuHeph Polltella, Edltor- 
tn-i'.hlrf. 



A. C. Library 



OUTSTANDINt; EVENT 
OV TIIK WEEK 



^olteaian 



I'he Trualeca ufier niontha 
of nvari'hinit Helriletl lliiith 
I*. Ituker UK rrcultlt-nl of (he 
tUiilfttti, 



\ol XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER L^, 19.^2 



Number ^ 



Semester System Adopted Hugh P. Baker to take Presidency; 



Will Start Next Fall 



ViARD and GURALNICK 
COLLEGIAN EDITORS 



Pulitella Resigns Because of 
111 Health 



Willard Raymond Ward was elected 
editor-in-chief of the Massachusetts Col- 
/cjiiK/ at a recent meeting of the editorial 
board to succeed Joseph Politella who 
risij;ne<l because of ill health. Eugene 
(uiralnick was elected managing eilitor 
to 111! the position vacated by Ward. 

Joseph Politella was elected editor last 
March at the end of the winter term and 
he served until October (5; Ward and 
(iuralnick will serve until next March 
at which time new editors will be chosen. 
Both new apjKjintt^s are members of the 
(lass of Ut;i.}. 

Willard Raymontl Ward comes from 
Hrookline and graduated frcjm the Brook- 
liiif High St:hool. He is a member of the 
Clinstian Asstx-iation Cabinet, Outing 
Cluli. International Relations Club and 
the Liberal Club, lie has served on the 
i'i)lks.uni Hoard for three years. 

Kugene (Iuralnick comes from Rox- 
liury and graduated from the Kast 
HosKin High SchtK>l. lie is manager of 
varsitN' soccer, and a member of the 
Christ iati Association Cabinet, lie serve<l 
on the 19;{;i Index, on the CoUes,ian for 
ihriT years, and is a member of Delta 
I'hi Alpha. 



Students Hear Lewis, 

To Form Political Club 

Socialist Candidate for Ciovernor 
Gives Interestinfl Talk 



.\ltri-d H. ker Lewis, Socialist can<lidate 
for (iovcrnor of Massiichuselts, addrcs.setl 
a student meeting last Thursday after- 
noon in Memorial Hall. This mci'ting 
was held for the purpose of forming a 
non (lartisan political club on the campus. 
.Alfred !5ro\vn of the department ol 
■^Kriiultural Hconomics introduce<l Mr. 
I-ewis, who outlined the party platform 
and explained the ideals of the Socialist 
Piirty. Mr. Lewis said in i)arf : "S(Ki ilism 
is i>ublic ownership and dcmcKrati( 
management of industry. Socialism is a 
mctlKKl of operation whereby the worker 
"f liic mine, the factory, or farm sliall 
shin- cfjually with the managers in the 
distribution of [)rofits. Capitalism to<la\ 
i* "it k and through its inefftciency and 
corruption great numbers of men are 
starving while there is abundance of fcxxl. 
Iiir s!irh a condition in this land, there 
" : can be no excuse. The [)resent 
<jwners of industry hold the jxiwer of life 
and (Icith over their empU)yees. . . Li 
the <k-cade of lHHt to H»2'.>, American 
busiii! vs attempted to sell thirty per cent 
more ;;<km1s to a prol 'tariat who receivefl 
••nH nino per cent more wages than in 
!<■ l<.M)9to 1919. This caused the 
"1. The raising of wages wouhl 
' ' curbed the increased production, 

f'Ut i!ic money powers decreased pro- 
'lurtion instead, thereby starving mi lions 
>e their surplus in the bank." 
Mr. Lewis' address, a committee 
was elected by the students tu 
-^ for the formation of a politic, d 
1' h will be divided into three or 
I tions; a section rejjresentative 
"I the larger American political 
liiese plans will Ik' annoanced 
ident body as stxm as th'jy are 
• ihe members of t'li- 
T' : Rohrt Ho,fcjrd, W:' 
ii'i W Ravmond Wan!. 



Mm )N1C CJNCLR 

;ii will again conduct 
"jrk I'iiii.iarmonic Synipoony 
I' a radio concert at ;> >. 
! 'Ikt 1»;. Tiiis conct r i 

^d . ; i:i I BuildinK- 



TERM SYSTEM IN USE 
SINCE FALL OF 1918 

After sixteen years of ojieration under 
the term system, the administraticm 
announces that the seniester plan has 
been a<lopted by the faculty and will be 
put into effect at the beginning of the 
sihcKjl year in Scptemlwr UKJ.L 

From the o|)ening of the college in 
IXtlT until HHCt, the semester system was 
employed. The next year the term plan 
was inaugurated because •>f the following 
reasons: 

"The faculty and the trustees ha\e 
approved a plan whereby, beginning 
September, HtUi, the college year will be 
divided into four terms, including a 
summer session. It is exiH'cted that by 
offering work in the practical depart- 
ments during the summer months a 
more adequate training will be assured to 
the students. The plan contemplates no 
marked change in the content or charac- 
ter of the various courses of sturly <le- 
s<Tibed in this catalogue." I'age 41, 
li»15-l«>l«t College Catalogue. 

Since that time, the term system has 
been in force, but the fourth term was 
never <levelope<L As this was the sole 
excuse for the term system, the semester 
plan was adopted. 

In considering the semester plan the 
Scholarship Committee who undert<K)k 
the study of the » urriiulum found the 
following advantages in the new i)lan: 

From the student-faculty viewjKiint: 

(I) The con^preliensivc t>i>e of ex- 
amination is favored at this college l)e- 
cause the instructor and student are re- 
quired to pay more attenticm to the sub- 
ject matter and retentiim of the subjei ted 
matter is in( rc-ased. The semester plan 
fitted this ty()e of examination. 

(Continued on Pafte 4, Column I) 

New Chorus Attracts 

Much Student Interest 




Will Assume Duties About Feb. 1 

Will Give Up Post as Dean of New York State College of Forestry 
at Syracuse University to Hold New Office; Has Reputation as 
Successful Administrator in Education and Business. 

Hugh I*, haker of Syracuse, N. V., 
will be the ehventh president of the 
\las.s.iihusetts State College. Sclettion 
of a sut-cessor to Rosixh- W. Thatcher, 
resigned September 1 because of ill 
he.dth, was made last Thursday by the 
college trustees in their meeting at the 
Host(m City Club. 

Mr. Maker, at present dean of the New 
Wuk State College of Forestry at Syra- 
cuse University, is well known as an 
etIiK'.itor and administr.itor. It is ex- 
pected that the n<'w president will 
assume his office at the State College 
about February 1, llKj.'L 

lie was born at St. Croix Falls, Wis- 
consin in IK7K. He receive<l his bachelor 
of science flegree from Michigan State 
College. He also holds the degree of 
master of forestry from N ale I'niversity 
and (hH'tor of eccmomics from the llni- 
v.-rsity of Muiiiih, (iermany. He began 
his work in the held of professional 
forestry in IK<).'>. For ten years he was 
insp<-ctor fur the Cnited States Forest 
Service in the northwest seition of the 
country. 

In 1!M(4 he organizer! the dep.irtment 
of forestry at Iowa State College and 
until l".M)7 was professor <if f(»resir> at 
(Continued on i*a|t« 4, 0>lumn 3) 

Robert Ferguson Gives 
Community Concert Plans 



to 



'It I 



"ii 



DifTerent Policy Beiiift Followed 

With three rehearsids already held, and 
fifty or so voices tune<l tf)gether in har- 
monious accord, the Massachusetts Stale 
College Chorus is showing signs of be- 
coming one of the most jn^pular organiza- 
tions on the campus. K<-eping the idea 
in mind that all who attend meetings 
come for a genial sfxial hour as well as 
for the concentrated attack of chords, 
harmonic progressions, and "agitato a la 
cres<cn<lo," manager William Smith ".i^i, 
and Director W. (irant Hunham '.'{4 are 
selecting the more popular of classical, 
semi-classical, and college songs for 
musical enjoyment. 

As opposed to the <ustom of previous 
years of presenting a complete operetta 
after weekly practice throughout the; 
year, the chorus is to confine itself for | 
awhile, at least, the (jrogram songs of the I 
(oncert tyjK-, with oi casional concerts in I 
view. The idea is to f(x-us attention to j 
tlie expression of songs of manv writers 
rather than to ( itnfine the singing through- 
out the yeir to the composition of any 
one man. ii \-^ hoped that this methm! 
wil! help to foster an active interest in 
musif among the students on campus. 
and that it will *. rve to maintain the 
chorus as a b"n;t G'le undergraduate 
I)roposition, rat i !'<><ly in which 

the student taLni is subordinated to the 
artistry of outside mus:< ians. The chorus 
•.vil! br- one of mixed voices, and tiiose 
sufficient numb( r oi 
rcicai.-,.)! all 1 u;ipearanres wil. be ,i- 
u.irded aiM.icmic credits. * 

.\ll undergraduates are invite<i to join. 
Rehearsal are held every Tue.s<iay 
evening in t.ie Memorial B .i!i,ing ai 
8 p.m. So iruno voi c- in p^nr :i.r .;r. 
dedred, al.iio <gh al! thos.- intrcsvcd are 
..rgcfl to att nd reiuar^als. Roje: U.itf^ 
■.;4 is t le pi 'lo a<-( iimjiian 

(f>>ntliiued "n I'a4c 4. f;oIumn i 



President Mufth i>. Maker 



FIRST SOCIAL UNION New Band Prospects 

TO BE HELD NOV, 17 Look Very Favorable 



W. Grant Dunham New Dirc'ctor 

With lh«- addilioti of tweu(\' or so 
freshmen musicians lo I lie veU-ran mi- 
lieus on campus, prosper ts for a 4()-pie(«' 
baiul of exc-llent (aliber are belter than 
they have Iwen for s<inie years, according 
to W. f irant Dunham "M, recently ap- 
pointecl by the Acad«'mi<-s Moard as 



Saveli W'alevitch Will Present 
Russian Son^^s 

Saveli Walevitch will bring a bit of oM 
Russia lo Massjichusetls Slate College 
when he presents R issian folk M»ngs and 
Ciypsy ballads at the first Social Union 
entertainment of tli<- year, November 17, 
in Stockbriflge I bill. i 

Saveli Walevitch is among ihe first of [ ;ij„.,.t„r. This year will mark the first 
the Russians who have introdured t hesc ,.^.^1,,,,. ,,f j^^. ,,.^,„| ^^ ^ strictly college 
ol.l songs and balla.ls to Ameri.;.. VVilhi„„j ;,„,)„„ ^^,^. Aca<lemics Bonrd having 
him it is a work of devotion, in order to ;„.,.e,,ted it as one of the .>rgaMizat ions 
preserve thi. primilive art. which, with ,„„|j,r its su|K-rvi;-ion. Previously the 
the growth of wesl.rn culture, is rapi lly ,,,^,„| ,,,,^ ,„.j.„ ., ,„„rj. „^ y.^^ f^c-e lancc' 
vanishing, even in Russia itself. .,,f.,j^ ^,,,1,.^ partial direclion of the 

Ancic-nt folk wmgs have «">siderably . y,j|j^.,^y department, and using both 
influenc i-d modern Russian niiisic. As far ^..^,^^.^^ .„„| vobinte. r p. r.ormc-rs. 
back as ISCO it was fx-rc-ei'tible when a, ;y,^_ |)„„l,am. imnu-liale successor lo 



talented circ le of music ians known as the 
".Mighty Live" was formed, including 
MalakirctT, Ciii, Moussorgsky, Moroclin 
and kimsky-Korsiikcjff. The greater part 
of the art of these- composers was dcejjly 
rcx>ted in the soil cjf the Russi.an folk 
(Continued on Paite 4, Column .S) 



CAMPUS CALKNDAR 

The soundiHii cnlarad 
Ununleil mr like a l>a^\i<in: the tall riiik. 
The moHnliim. ami Ihr drep nnii nlotimy wood. 
I heir tiilar-. and Ihrir f'lrms, were then to me 
An <!/>/>»•///<■. II U'li'U and a line, 

H'iUiiim HViri/sirw/A 
/,(>!r•^ ah'ivr linlrrn ,!')'"•>■ 

Thursday. Oitobt-r l.« 

7:M> |i.ni. < rilli'L'i.in I rw.iits 

Friday, t)ctolwr 14 

Hoiw 'l;ini I's 
Saturday. October I.S 

\ iir^ily Footlwll, ( onn. State it Si'irrs 

Sunday. OcIoImt 16 

:5 (K» ji 111 rhilli.'iiiniiii' foin'-ri. M'-morinl 
Hall 
Monday. <)c»c>»>er IT 

7.:{0 p.m. Haii'l l< 
Tuesday. October ls 

s 'HI i.'.in. C hoi 11- 

S,(|C) ji.iii. \i-wiii.iii ' i-ilj III'' iiiiL'. 
St'x khri'lK'' 
Wednesday, October l"» 

■i.2<) p.m. Seiiati- Stiifli'nt ,\'««<tiiI>Iv 

S (10 ii.m. r)«'bating Sm ifty tii<-<tiiii! 



AmIierHt Membership Will lie 
Limited 

Robert Ferguson, field maii;igcr of the 
Ccmmninily Concc-rt Service unch-r which 
the- /Xmhc-rsI Conmninily Concert Asso- 
ci.ition operates, dc-.sc ribed the Com- 
munity Conc-erl plan in detail at a recent 
iiiter\iew. 

Ihe Community Cctncert Ser\ice, Mr. 
Icrgiison statc-d, was originated and 
established .ibout five years ago by W.trd 
!■ rc-nc h who now cKcupies the |K>sition of 
genc-r.d manager in the corporation. He 
promoted I his ide.i of procuring the 
aiicjience l)efore the- .irtists to jissure 
financial success throughonl the world. 
He- gave lo small cities and towns the 
opiMjrtunilv lo sc-e .md he.ir world 
famous, rec c)^;iii/ed artists. His idea l»e- 
camc- firiidy «-stablishec| anci was adopted 
by a strong organizaticm. Tf»day, five of 
I be- Icacling ccinccrt m<-n of New N'ork 
( ity constitute the |H>wer behind the 
movement. Under the name of the 
Cciminunity Coficerts ST\ice which is a 



rlivision of the Columbia Concerts Ccjr- 
the popular Captain Kdwin Miles Sunmer, |K,ralion of the Columbia Mro.id.asting 
c-omposer of Flight, Mnssiif husctls. 



inci 

Massiuhtisetts Stale March, was leader 
last year of the Military Hancl. He re- 
ceived his training under Henjamin T«c 1 
c)f Teel's Mostcjn MancI, a fcjrmer Army 
I banclmastcr who had < harge of the .7K) 
bands in the famous Liberty Loan 
I'aracle cluring the War. Dunham has 
also played first clarinet as .i sectirm.il 
I representative cjf the New Flnglancl High 
I S hcKjl Symphony Orchestra, aricl in the 
(ape Ccxl Concert Maud, of which he- is 
.seccjnd leader. His coniftositions have 
bc-en playecl sc-\c ral times c»\ct the raclio, 
one of which is the n-w c-c»||ege lootbali 
song, Slatonia. The manager of the banci 
this year is Ralph Henry ';>4, master of 
sc-veral instriimc-nts and an artist c>n the 



System, these men contrcd approximately 
H.') |)er c-ent c)f the musical genius and 
talent of America. Some- of I he- world 
famous artists who are under the manage- 
ment c)f this company are: Amc-lita 
tialli Cure i, Lito Sthippa, Lily Pons, 
and Ros;i Pons lie of the .VfetrotN)litan 
Opera Ccmipany. Paul Rc»beson, Richard 
Crooks, ancI .Mary f.arch-n .ere a few of 
the purely American artists 

Mr. Ferguson s.iicL "There are 144 
citic-s in America uride r this plan, 2.{ of 
wliie h are in New laigl.mcl. .\niong them 
arc-: Springfic Id, (.ardnc r, .North Adams, 
Lowedl. Lawrence ancI Proviclencc-. The 
Providence c»rganiz;iticm with .Cd*) mem- 
Ikts is considered the strongest " 



cello, whn h In- playe-l fcir several years "In the (ipiiiiufi ot the n.iiiorial organi- 

as a staff performer in the- W N.\C stiiclio zation," Mr. lerguson contitiued, "the 
of Boston, and as i soloist in cjne of the Andicrst group is very strongly organ- 
jiopular hotel ciri In -n i- in Hostcm. i/ed. " He went on to siiy that the mem- 

So far the- band has macle two appear- IjtTship wendd be limited thi>- • n In- 
ane cs, and rehearsjtls have l>een underway | cause of the small seating cap,i<ii\ of 
in the cage for man hing cm the gricliron, i the auditorium where the cemc trts will 
a feat which has not bseo atic nipted by be h«|c|. Only (u't will beiome tnemlKfrs 
(Continued on Pafte 2, Column f>) of the- as-^>e i.it ion. 



» 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COI.I EGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1932 



I 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, TIIIRSDAY, OCTOBER U, \9M 



/Ilba60acbu6etr Collegian 



Official newsi)ai)fr of the Massac husitts State College, Published every 
Tluirsdav 1)V tlii' students. 



HOAKl) Ol 
W 



Ravmovd Wakd 
IJit'f-iu-i hief 



i:i)iT()ks 



EUliENE (llJKAIMIK '33 

AJananing iditur 



ALFKEDA L. OkDVVAY 

Aiiocialc lulilor 



•33 



Campus 

Raymond Koyal '34. l-.dilnr 
Alfkkda L. Oruwav '.33 
Rlth 1). Camphkll '.34 
Harhiette M. Jackson '34 
Mary L. Allbn '3.'» 
David L. AKKNiiBRr, '35 
Elizabeth K. Hakrin(;ton 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 

Editorial 

W. Raymond Wakd '33 

Athletics 
Thi:oD)ke M. Lbarv '3o 



Silas Littlk, Jr. "35 



Do Vou Inhale? 

Infortunately many do unco.-isciously, 
(iH(l luitliut)!, can he done about it. 
ss 

The case of the freshman co-ed who 
received a pledge button from a fraternity 
is balanced by the case of the freshman 
who enrolled in the girls physical edu- 
cation class. 



-BS- 



•3.-, 

Feature 

Stanly V. Seperski 



F.xcbanites 

Alfreda L. Ordwav "33, Editor 



34 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
Advertising Manager 

Frank Batstone '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. Gurney '33 

liuiiness Manager 



Business Assistants 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Manager 

\V. Lawrence Schknck '.34 



Subscriptions $2.()() |)cr year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massiichusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
eve ning. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103. Art of October, 11)17. authorized AuRuat 20. liH.S. 



EDITORIALS ^ ^ ^ 



^ ^ ^ 

ACKiRKSSIVK LKADERSHIP 

"It will take a big man to fill IVesitlent Thatchers place," s;iid Uean Machmer 
at the opening assembly this year. Hugh Maker is a big man. It is apparent that the 
Trustees of the college have made a wise choice. Dr. Thatcher effet ted many changes 
during his administration, bringing the college into the midst of its present |)eriocl ot 
transition. It will take an aggressive leadership and great vision to carry the insti- 
tution through the changes now in progress to greater service to the Commonwealth. 
Hugh Maker is a man with such (|u,dities. 

His long reccjrd as an educator AUi\ business man shows him as a master builder, 
building always for the future. The visionary powers which enabled him to build up 
the New York State College of Forestry into the foremost school of its kind in the 
country will enable him to build up the .Massachusetts State College to meet ade- 
quately, not only the needs of the present, but the needs of the future, which are so 
hard to foresee. 

Hugh Maker is more than a mere expert in education in forestry. He is a strong 
leader with an innate liking for young peo|>le, and it was this that drew him back to 
the State College of Forestry after ten successful years of planning and organizing in 
the btisiiuss world. His extensive travel abroad, especially in C.trmany where he 
received the degree of DcKtor of Kconomics from the Iniversity of Munich i.i HMO, 
together with his wide ext)erience as an educator and administrator, has made of 
him a leader who is not only strong and progressive, but who is broad in his back- 
ground and understanding. Such a man is exceptionally well fitted to administer 
the affairs of this College. 

Massachusi'tts State College has built itsilf a reputation that is outstanding in 
this region which abounds in colleges V)ecause of the unitjue service it has performed 
to the citizens of the Commonwealth. The selection of a forester as president suggests 
that the college will not wander far from the chosen field in which it has been so 
successful, but the selection of such an outstanding leader and organizer suggests i 
that the college will progress and spread out into that chosen field much more than 
ever liefore. 

It is our humble opinion that the Trustees have made a wise and unusually for- 
tunate selection, and that the Massiuhusetts State College now stands on the thresh- 
old of an era of growth and leadership that will be unique ia the history of the insti- 
tution. ■ 

HONOR AMONG STUDENTS 
We believe in the honor system. Oth< r colleges have tried honor systems without 
permanent success, but this college prides itself on the fact that it has an honor sys- 
tem that works. We do not sjiy that it is perfect; we do say that it works. 

Kach year the greatest menace to the honor system is the freshman class. To the 
average freshman the Honor System is an entirely new idea. He comes here from 
schools in which examinations are given under the close supervision of at least one 
teacher, and often two or three. Cpon his arrival here he is provided with a copy of 
the Constitution and the My-laws of the Honor System and a Freshman Handbook 
in which there is a page (le\ oted to the Honor System. In the rush of Freshman Week 
maybe he reads them and maybe he does not. .\t any rate, they deal with a situation 
so far outside of his experience that they can mean but very little to him. 

The result is that many of the cases that come before the Honor Council involve 
members of the freshman class. Mut by the time these same students become upp?r- 
classmen, they seem to have devclo|>ed a strong r sense of honor and responsibility, 
and a deeji feeling of pride in the fact that here there is an honor system that works. 
The upperc lassmen are determined that it shall continue to work. 

Faculty members who employ what amounts to a monitor system in their ex- 
aminations, thus showing that they have little or no confidence in the Honor System, 
are pl.uing obstacles in the way of its success. What man will become responsible if 
he is given no responsibility? What man will become trustworthy if he is never 
trusted? It is rather significant that such instructors are in the minority, and that 
most of the faculty members conduct thc'r examinations trusting the honesty of the 
students and with confidence in the I lonor System. They do not find their confidence 
greatly misplaced. 

The student who sees another cribbing in an examination finds himself in a diffi- 
cult positicm. Reponing n case of dishonesty is not "sciuealing" in the ordinary 
sense of the word. It is not a pleas;int duty, but one would be very fortunate if that 
should be the must unpleasant thing he ever had to do in life. It is doing a service 
to the college by helping materially to make the Honor System a suc^-ess and to up- 
hold the reputation of the student body. 

If the Honor .System is to continue to be a workable plan, it must receive the 
adr.r support c)f the student body. It is not enough to refrain from dishonesty; 
those who have no resjiect for the s>stem and for the reputation of the college must 
be brought to just ire-, .md until some better way can be devised, the students must 
take the responsll.ilit> of cnforring the ruk-s of the Honor Council by reporting cases 
of their \i<)lalioii. 

In s|iii,' nl I'uvM- ilittu il.iis the Honor System works and the college is proud of it. 
With increased eo-op,Talion on the part of both the student body anil the faculty, 
these obstacles could, for the most part, be removed and the system made douVily 
effective and secure. 1 iie imimivement wo dd certainly be worth the effort. 



A LOST ART 

"A lost art! That of scratching a 
match on the seat of your trousers. Me- 
fore we had these scratching places on 
every box of matches and these small 
j pajier matches, the technique was com- 
mon. One lifted the right leg with more 
or less freedom, pulled aside his coat- 
tails, stretched the dome of his trousers 
over the flesh and with a quick but de- 
termined movement created sufficient 
friction to ignite the match. Much has 
departed from life formerly that suggested 
liberty of both body and mind.'' 
— — ss 

A group of State focjtball players in 
wandering about the Middlebury campus, 
barged into the Middlebury mass meet- 
ing which w.is held the night before the 
M.S.C. -Middlebury football game. 
ss 

The species of birds which inhabits the 
Malay peninsida and always sleep upside 
down has its parallel in the birds who 
sleep sitting up in the classrooms. 
■ ss- — ■ — 

Speaking of empty honors, at the 



Oil l-riday night, October 7, Kohmy 
Klub held a smoker for the freshmen, with 
about forty attending. Refreshments 
were served and an entertainment was 
furnished by the members. 

The club looks forward to a prosperous 
new year under the able leadership of the 
following officers: president, Alfred N. 
Hill; vice-president, Henry W. Merrill; 
secretary, Charles R. Bonnemort; trea- 
surer, A. Lowell Eastman; marshall, 
John Sullivan; historian, Eric W. Sim- 
mons. 



Joseph C. Saalfrank, S'32, was on the 
campus last Sunday. Joe is now em- 
ployed as a greenkeeper at the Merrimac 
Country Club, Methuen, Mass. 



* tioticce t 



poLrnc:AL radio speech i 

From 10-11 p.m. fclastern Stain 
Time on October 17th there will be 
over the N.H.C. National hookup 
Messiige to the Iniversity Men 
Women of America." This is an endi 
to make the Presidential campaign 
nitely educational. The program ol 
Democratic party will for thirty mimii 
be presented by (iovernor Albert ( 
Ritchie. Immediately following iln 

Secretary Ray Lyman Wilbur will 
thirty minutes present the RepuM 
program. President Hoover will s] 
only long enough to express his appr. 
of the (Kcasion. 



lilC 



• in 
val 



University of Wisconsin are three ath- 
letes who are captains of teams that no 
longer exist. All were chosen before there 
was a reduction in the athletic budget for 
this sports year. Tennis, hockey and 
wrestling were placed on an intramural 
basis leaving three captains without 
teams to captain. 

ss 

The new regulations pertaining to the 
Informals were scrupulously adhered to 
at the last Informal. The stag line was 
the smallest in many dances and kept off 
the dance floor. For the first time a 
fellow could dance with his whole atten- 
ticm given to his partner and not keep a 
watchful and suspicious eye on the soli- 
tary and roving males of the encircling 
stag line. 



Alumni speakers who addressed the 
freshmen at the class suppers of regis- 
tration week were: 

Everett T. Dimock, S'.'iO, herdsman 
and assistant instructor in barn practice 
at the Norfolk County Agricultural 
School, Walpole. 

Herman Couture, S'.'iO, plant foreman 
at the Pittsfield Milk Exchange, Pitts- 
field, .Mass. 

Philip A. Wilcox, S'28, in charge of 
Cniversity of New Hampshire poultry 
plant, Durham, N. H. 

Ernest F. Markert, 8*20, fruit farm 
o|K-rator at South .\mherst and manager 
of the Wilton, N. II. apple-packing plant. 

Allen M. lielden, S'29, in partnership 
with William W. Mclntire, S'29, The 
New llam|)shire Landscape Service, Man- 
chester, N. H., managing his own concern. 

Milton C. Allen, S'2.i, Assistant Mana- 
ger in charge of sales and purchasing, the 
Boston Market (iardening Company, 
Waban, Mass. 

Emilio A. Masciocchi, S'20, green- 
keeper at the Oak Hill Country Club, 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

Henry K. Weidlich, S'.32, florist in 
charge of greenhouses at State Hospital, 
Northampton, Mass. 



The l'.):54 temporary class officers to 
serve until December are: president. 
Edward A. Machon of Rah way, N. J.; 
vice-president, Stephen A. Eldred of 
Weston; secretary, Edward L. L'himan 
of Westboro; treasurer, Roger L. Hersey 
of Hingham. 



SENATE ASSEMBLY 

Next Wednesday there will be aninher 
Senate Assembly for cheering and sin>;iiiK 
practice. Mimeograph cojiies of all sonj;,, 
including the Medley, and all cheers will 
be passed out. After the Senate annouiin- 
ments, the assembly will be turned ..vtr 
to the scmg leader and cheer leaders with 
the expectation that all classes will co- 
operate in giving a gocxi exhibition of 
college singing and cheering. 

AMHERST ART CLUB 

Massachusetts State College stu<liiu< 
are invited to attend the classes of the 
-Amherst Art Club which begin next wick 
according to an announcement made re- 
cently by Professor C. H. Toll of Anilurst 
College. There will be classes in etdiiiiK, 
drawing and pastel, bIcK-k prints, and life- 
drawing. Each class will meet for a two 
hour period once a week. Arrangeimiit- 
are in charge of Professor Toll and Mr>. 
Dwight Salmon, and further iiifoiinalion 
can be obtained from them. 



We believe th.it t!u re 1- li<iiiiir aiiiuii^ stiidciits. We li.i\c (onfidence in the Honor 



System. 



Bolshevism has finally made its ap- 
pearance on this fair campus! Socialistic 
viewpoints are being tinged with red. 
The scullions down at Drajx-r Hall have 
banded themselves into a Seniet with a 
set of rules and regulations governing 
its members. Comrade l.'J was elected 
the head of the proletariat. Propaganda 
is being spread among the ranks of the 
bus boys by Comrades 4 and 18 who are 
in charge of the advertising campaign. 

Down at C.A.C. their R.O.T.C. unit 
has lieen issued new uniforms of gray 
and black. The khaki uniforms were too 
rough to their tender skins. 
• 9& 

Here you are fellows, test your knowl- 
edge of the W.S.Ci.A. rules. Answer by 
writing right or wrong in the spaces. 

1. Two or more girls may enter a 
fraternity house during an evening pro- 
vided they stay on the first floor 

2. A girl is allowed lo minutes after 
a dance closes to reach her house. Sup- 
pose it takes that much time to renew 
her make-up? 

:i. The "GaSles" is one of the ap- 
proved dance halls. 

— — ss 

CAMPIS CALENDAR 

Sunday, October 10 

There will be no Outing Club hike. 

ss 

Women have finally invaded the inner 
sanctum of mens' privacy. A co-ed 
smoking rcxim was installed and form- 
ally opened at a M.l'. dormitory. 

ss — — 

Now that the Informals are putting 
the freshmen in their place a set of ruLs 
governing their conduct at the dining 
hall would be welcome. At the New 
Mexico State College all freshmen must 
remain outside until all upp^rr las^mcn 
have entered. What a break that would 
be on chapel morning! 

■ -ss — - — 

PROF. FRANK P. RAND 
"Dorothy's Good Friday" 
Paging Mr. Robinson Crusoe! 

- — ss — - — 
What this country needs is fewer 
paragraphers and a l.iw against column- 
ists. 



The Stockbridge Student Council and 
the senior class gave a special reception 
and dance to the members of the fresh- 
man class in the Memorial Building, 
Thursday evening, October 6. Frank 
Small, president of the Student Council 
and John Turner, president of the class 
of 19;J3 were the committee in charge. 
Professor and Mrs. Rollin H. Barrett and 
Instructor and Mrs. Alden P. Tuttle 
acted as chaperones. 



FALL FLOWER SHOW 

Featuring exhibits by the entire de- 
partment of Horticulture as well as 
exhibits from other sources, the annual 
fall flower show will this year be held in 
the Physical Education cage from Novem- 
ber I to I'.i. With the large amount of 
space available the possibilities for this 
year's show are much greater than in 
previous years. A really creditable 
exhibition should be forthcoming. The 
committee of students in charge of 
arrangements is headed by Wilfred H. 
Bedord "3:i. 



SENATE RULES 

New Senate regulations for inforni.ils 
are attempting to eliminate the stag line 
that has always been a menace to men 
who bring girls to these dances, and 
which all too often interferes with the- 
dancing. From now on, there is to he no 
cutting during the first number of any 
dance, and no cutting during the last 
dance. In addition to this ruling, sta^s 
may cut only 0.1 members of their own 
class or below. Above all, the sla^ lint 
is to rem.iin behind the pillars and leave 
the floor free for the dancers. 

Hard as these regulations may seem to 
the lower classes, the Senate wishes it 
understood that these rulings are not 
directed against any tme class, although 
in former years it has been freshmen who 
formed the largest part of the stag line. 
Right of refusal to any would-be cutter 
is ojien to all classes. 



The way the Stcx-kbridge students hang 

around and admire the freshmen military 

classes proves that they have no idea how 

•eavy a it-pound rifle can be on a hot 

aftern(X)n. 



NEW BAND PROSPECTS 

LOOK VERY FAVORABLE 
(Continued from Paftc 1) 

the M.S.C. Band for several years, flans 
are in the offing for the bi-annual trip 
with the football team to Tufts at Med- 
ford, and Drum-Major \eerling "-io has 
been working on formations for fitl<l 
maneuvering, with the assistance of 
Snow '35. V'ecrling is an acccmiplislnd 
trombonist, having seen scnice in Kiiroix? 
with an American Legion Band, "ther 
plans include the annual radio broadcast 
over WBZ, appearance in the Bay State 
Review, playing at all home athletic 
events and occasional away-from home 
affairs, and Sunday evening concerts on 
campus during the spring term. I 
will win academic credits for 
attendance. 

Although the list is not yet complete 
the following roster includes thos-. mu- 
sicians already having ptrfornu 
the organization: 



i\er5 
steady 



with 



THE POEM OF THE MONTH 

THIS SP.-\CE is reserved in the first issue of each month 
for the publication of the best piece of verse submitted 
by an undergraduate in the Poem-of -the- Month contest. 

Manuscripts must be submitted to Mr. Rand (by mail or 
in his office I on or before the loth of the previous month. 
For this month's contest he will accept manuscripts up 
to 12 o'clock on Monday morning, October 17. 

Manus ripts will not be returned to the author. The one 
rated by the judge as second-best, however, will be auto- 
maticrdly entered in the contest for the following month. 

At the en. I of the year a prize of .*2.5.(K) will be awarded 
for the published verse adjudged the best of the year's 
offerings. 



-^ 



* SPORTS 



•«• 



•*• 



Soccer Team Scores Up 
2-1 Victo ry Over Tech 

HARRIERS CHOSEN TO 8tk SUCCESSIVE WIN 
RUN TUFTS SATURDAY MARKS OPENING GAME 



Bol) Murray Sets New Course Record 
in Time Trials 



In the first time trial of the year over 
,|„ \.irsity course. Bob Murray cut Don 
M.i-.n's record of last year thirty-five 
stcoiiils in spite of the fact that he had 
liitK- or no competition. To this out- 
standing sophomore harrier. Coach Derby 
„,11 i>robably add the following men: 
CaiKl. Crawford, Crosby, Snow, Little, 
and .Mien to make up the team which 
will ()i)|K>se Tufts here next Saturday. 

Time trials for the varsity men were 
held list S.iturclay morning at IC'iO and 
ai 1I.:U). In the first one, CairtI and 
Cr.iwlord were clocked together at 2.')m. 
s.% Crosby finished close behind them, 
,iiid then after an interval came Snow 
and little with (iallup and Dworman 
tuiling in the distance. Murray, Jordan. 
and Keil ran at 11.30, when Bob set the 
new record 22m. 12s. Jordan and Keil 
nearly evenly matched, were the likely 
.hoiies for seventh man to run against 
Tuits, but Monday, Bob .Allen made 
Ix-tter time than either. Provided no 
Itetter times are made by any others of 
the twenty-one candidates. Captain Caird, 
Murniv. Crawford, Crosby, Snow, 1-ittle, 
ami .\IIen will make up the team to 
oppose the Jumbos. 

Cross-Country Teams 
Have Won 25 out of 39 

III the ten years that Massachusetts 
M.ite College has had a cross-country 
Ham. there has been only one year when 
the M.irocm and White harriers lost more 
meets than they won. The teams have 
enna^ed in 30 dual meets, winning 2.'); 
while of the three triangle meets State 
has won one and placed second in two. 

.\g.iinst its main rivals. State has won 
the great majority of the meets. From 
Wiiriester Tech, the Maroon and White 
harriers have captured seven and lost 
two. With the Lord Jeff men, State has 
»'in five out of nine; from St. Stephens, 
three out of four. Boston University has 
h'-en (omiiletely whitewashed as State 
'apture-d all four. With Wesleyan, State 
has split even, taking five meets out of 
ten; while from the other member of the 
I ittle Thre , Williams, Mass. State has 
*on two out of three races. Other 
\iiti)ries that have been chalked up were 
"ver Rhode Island Polytech, Rhode 
Island State, Conn. State, and Tufts. 
^tate bcjwed to Springfield once in 1028 
tnd tM Harvard in 1027 — in both cases 
(Continved on Pafte 4, Column 4) 



I By defeating Worcester Tech with a 
score of 2-1 last S,iturday at Worcester, 
the Mass. State Mooters carried their 
team to its eighth successive win in its 
first game this season. The Tech team 
was outclassed from the very first play, 
but ])ut up a game battle against pcxir 
condition, and lack of exiH-rience. 

With the opening whistle, the State 
bcK)ters took the ball into Tech's terri- 
tory, and kept it there for the first fifteen 
minutes of that pericKl. During that 
time there were several attempts at 
sc-oring, but with no succ-ess. The En- 
gineers now turned the battle the other 
way, and t(M>k their first shot at the State 
goal. The result was fruitless, however, 
and the game was sckjii again c-entered 
around the Worcester gtKil. At this time, 
the ball was brought through the oppos- 
ing fullbacks, and headed by Jackson to 
Koslowski, by whom it was scored for the 
first goal 

Tech attempted a comeback during 
the second cpiarter and while neither side 
scored, the ball was at both ends of the 
field about ecpially. Cowing, fullback for 
the State hooters, and Whittum, center 
halfback for the Engineers, were out- 
standing during this period. Both men 
s;t\ed goaU for iheii teams on more tliaii 
one occasion. 

The jieriod after the half, saw another 
tally added to the .Massachusetts score. 
Bernstein, State outside left forward, gc*t 
the ball on a long pass, and taking it 
alcme through the two o|)|>osing half- 
backs, pushed it into the net for the 
second store of the afternoon. 

State easily held off the very weak 
Worcester team for the remainder of the 
half, except towards the end of the game, 
when Bonlen, W.P.I. inside right for- 
ward, scored, due to the State backs 
being out of position. 

-Sargent, Allen and Whittum should be 
mentioned as the outstanding players for 
the Maroon and Grey, while Blackburn. 
Cowing, Jackscm. and Dobbie jilayed well 
for Massiichusetts. The line-up: 

Maaa. State Worceater Tech 

Dobt)ie. lloiiran, g K- Sargent 

Hotlson. rft) rfli. HcIk-I 

Cowinu. 1ft) lft>. Alli-n 

Talbot. Shiiman, rlib rhb. Sluiinski 

I'ruyne, chb dib. VVhittuni 

Blackltorn. Landsman, Ihb Ihb, TriiKill 

Miirkinimif, or "f- Wilson 

Taft, ir ". Borden 

Jackson, cf ef. Lyman 

Kozlowski. il il. Brand 

B<?rnstein. ol ol. Monks 

Store — Massachusetts State 2, Worcester Tech 
1. Goals — Kozlowski. Bernstein. Borden. Referee 
— Cummii.gs. 



Colonel Komeyn is an ardent follower 
of the football team. He was an all- 
American guard at Tulane and West 
Point. 



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DICTIONA R IES 

All Languages 

French - German - Spanish - Italian - Latin - (ireek 

§1.00 and up 

WEBSTER'S COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY 

Best English Dictionary — S.^.-'iO reduced from So.OO 

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OCTSlANDINd 


SPOKIS 


EVENT 


With 


I 2-1 win 


o\er \\ Orces 


ter Tech 


the Bay 


St.ite soccer team ch 


liked up 


its eight 


Il \iitor\- 


in a row. 





SPORIS CAI.ENl).\R 



Oi-lohvr M 

Inu-itrati-rnity Contests: I*hi Siiinia Ivapiia 
vs. .Mplm .Siiinia I'lii 
October 14 

Interfraternity Contests: Kapiia SiKiiia vs. 
l.)T.V.; Kappa Kpsilon vs. l>elta J'lii 
Alpha 
October IS 

\arsilv SiK>rts; 

I'liotball, Connecticut Slate at Storrs 
C'loss-Coiintry. Tufts at M.S.C. 
October IK 

Interlraternity Contests: Tlieta Chi vs. I'lii 
Simna KapiKi 
October l<» 

Interfraternity Contests: Alpha CJanima 
Kho vs. Kappa t-'psilon 
October 20 

\arsity SiKHts: Soccer, Chirk at M.S.C. 
Interlrateinity Sjiorts: Alpli.i SiKMia I'hi 
vs. Lambda Chi Al|iha 



^ Cbru the 1<not Iholc 'f 

Bill Cone, a sophomore, set a new pool 
record when he swam the 25-yard dis- 
tance b.ukstroke in 14 seionds in a 
physical education class tlii^ week. 



Tufts has its strongest team in >ears. 
Last Siiturday it defeated Bates. 14-0. 
Bates was the eleven that electrified the 
nation early this fall by holding Vale to 
.'I scoreless tic. 

Worcester Tech defeated Trinity 7-(l 
1. 1st Saturday. Colby downed Coast 
(iuard 21-0. Clarkson 21, K.IM. 0. 

Amherst College has cleveto|)ed a strong 
team under Coach Jordan this year. 
Last week the Siibrina eleven defeated 
I'nion 12-0. Union defeated Amherst 
last year, T-tl. 



This column is s(KMis(jring a contest 
for a new- nickname for the college atli- 
letii- teams. In the past the teams ha\e 
been known as the Zebras but this name- 
is now obs<»lete. Pilgrims is the best 
name suggested so far. Other suggestions 
are Bay Staters, Wildcats, anci The 
Maroon Wave. 

.•\lt hough he is not a regular, Johnny 
Wood, a sophomore, is one of the most 
popular and most plucky players <m the 
fcxitball scjuad. "WcMMlie" weighs but 
124 pounds yet he is out for practice 
e\ery day fighting for a varsity post 
against men muc h heavier than himself. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Irescriptions hilled. Broken lenses 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 

» PLEASANT STREET, (up on* fliahi) 

Y(ju have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING (0. 

"CicKxIyear Welt System Em[)lcjyed" 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

14 MALN STREET 

Between Town Hall and Masonic Buililinit 

MEN'S WHOLK .SOLES an<l CO OC 

RLIKBKK HEELS ^^-^O 

MKN'S HALF SOLES and 

R( BHt K HEELS 

MKN'S Rl BBER HEELS 



LADIES' ilALK .SOLES and 

RLHI.ER HEELS 

LADIES' RUBBER HEELS 
LADIES' LEATIIKR HEFLS 

All Work Guaranteed 



1.50 
.40 

1.25 
.30 
.25 



Bookends 

in 
Many Different Designs 

and at 

Prices from 

.Sl.OO to ss..-,o 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



State Downs Middlebury 
Meets Connecticut Next 



BUSH AND SHEFF 

SCORE TOUCHDOWNS 

Coach Mel T.iiibe's M.iss.ichuselts 
State College footb.ill te.iiii defeated a 
stubborn, hard tight ing Middlebury Col- 
lege eh-veii in .i well -played game at 
Middlebury, Wrmont on Dctober S, 
i;{-(>. .State scored its second victory of 
the season in its win over the X'ermonters, 
ha\ing defeat c-d Cooper rnion in the 
first g.ime. Columbia defeated Mid<lle- 
bury in the Cp-Staters first contest 51-0, 
while Middlebury played great football 
•igaiiist a strong Tufts elc-\ei), losing i» () 
ill its second contest. However, Middle- 
bury has a very much improved fooib.ill 
team over the I'.t.'il ele\en that was tie 
feateil by Massiichusetts State, .'{2-«i. 

Middlebury opened the scoring in the 
first period. After a long series of runs 
had placed the ball in .State territory, 
Middlebury conii>leted a successful lateral 
p.iss, lio\ le tt) llartrey, and llartrey 
reelc-d otT 2S yards for a Middlebiirv 
touchdown. The Vermonters' try for the 
extra point f.iileil. 

State bt-g.in its offensisf in the setoiid 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 3) 

Fraternity Athletics 

Opened Last Tuesday 

Since the fields were not in shape last 
week, the intc-rfr.iteriiit y g.iiiies st jiediilt-d 
for that week were postponed and will be 
playt-d later. .Xccoriling to the revised 
program, the contests st.irtt-d last lues 
day night with Kappa .Sigma playing 
.Alpha ( •amiii.i Kho in tlit- three sports 
swimming, touch football, and scN-cer. 
( >n the same night l.ambila Chi is matt heil 
with Sigma Phi K]isiloii. Tonight 
Thurstlay, Phi Sigma Kappa meets .Alpha 
Sigma Phi in I he second g.iine (if League A 

The rest of the schedule with the list 
of the two leagues is as follows: 



NUTMEGGERS HAVE 

LIGHT FAST TEAM 

The Massachusetts .Stale College foot- 
b.ill le.im will alttiiipl to win its thirti 
victory ol the season when it plays the 
Comietiicut State College varwity eleven 
at Storrs, Connecticut tin October l.'i. 
The Ctiiiiiet ticut team has not be-en very 
successful in its games sci far this year, 
having been trounced by Howdoin .{2-0 
in the first (tiiitest of the year. Last 
S.»t unlay, the Dow ii-Staters w«-re over- 
powered by a strong eleven from Wesleyan 
I'niversity in Comiet lit ut, 24 2. It was 
Wesleyan's first victory over Coiinet tit ut 
Slate ill sexc-n years. 

The Ctmnc-tticut coadies, Doir .md 
llelilmaii, li.ive been t oiu t-iit r.il ing all 
wiik till (t.rretling glaring delects in the 
liiie-play of the Coniiectitiif eleven against 
.Maine and Wesleyan. In an effort tu 
st lengthen his team, Heatl Coach Dole 
has made several drastic changes in his 
lineup. John i:<|dy will he switihetl from 
.1 t.ukle to .1 wing iiosiiiiin. .AllartI will 
(tA>nllnued wn I'ugv 4, Oilumn 3) 



Leaftue A 


Leuitue R 


Alplia SiKiiia I'lii 


Alpli.i (•.iiiiiii.i Kho 


Laiiilida (hi Alpli 


a Dflla I'll! Alpha 


I'lii SiKiii.i Kiippa 


Kapii.i Kprtilun 


Siuina I'lii Kit-^ilon Kupiia SiKiiia 


Theta Chi 


V T. V. 


(Xt. It 


K.S, VK. Q.TX. 




K.K. vs. D.I'.A. 


IK 


T.t . VH. P.S. 


1!) 


A.C.R. vs. K.K. 


20 


A.S. vs. L.C.A. 


21 


y.T.V. vn. D.I'.A. 


'zr, 


A.S. vs. T.C. 




K.S. vs. O.P A. 


2fi 


S.I'.K. vs. I'.S. 


27 


A.«;.R. vs. OT.V. 


2K 


I'.S. vs. L.C.A. 


Nov. 1 


T.( . vs. L.C.A. 


2 


K.K. vs. OT.V. 


:i 


S.I'.K. vs. A.S. 


4 


A.C.R. vs. O.P.A. 


K 


K S. vs. K.K. 


» 


T.C. vs. S.l'.E. 



I.VIO Finals 



Frosh Cross-Country 

Has Time Trials Today 

Tiiiie trials for the freshman cross- 
iDuntry scpiail In t liotise a tt-aiii tti tmii- 
pc-le ag.iinst the Amherst junior varsity 
next Thursday will be heltl this afterntMin 
at four o't lotk. All .ilmtisl green te.im 
will li.iM to In- I In (sen, as from the 42 
who have reported only two or three 
lia\. h.itl any experiente w-hatscM-ver in 
t TOSS tfiiintry. 

The whediilf for the freshman ami 
junior varsity harriers begins October 20 
when the Amherst frosh and jayvees 
come here. .At that time Slate's junior 
varsity is iiiatcheil against AiiiherHt '.'10, 
while Slate ",U) runs the l.iinl JelT settinds. 
,\ wtek later tin- two Stile te-aiiis g«» to 
.Amherst where the State and Amherst 
SCI oiids iiii-et .is ri\als as do the two 
freshman teams. On November .'Ird the 
State jayvees run over the home course 
with their own freshmen; while two 
weeks later comes the graiitl finale when 
the State and Amherst freshman and 
junior varsity st|iiads and the Stoc kbritlge 
scpiatl run in the scpiad r.ii c .it Amherst. 
On November 7tli proviiled that the 
freshman team has some outstanilinf( 
iiH-n, Coach Derby will inter the fresh- 
man team in the New Knglaiid liiter- 
collegiiites at Kostoii. 



ALL WOOL ZIPPKR COATS 

Navy, Mine. MarcKin and C.reen . . . $L45 

CORDrROV TROISLKS 

Cirty, Blue and Hrowii $2.4.> 

TIRTLK i\H( K .S\\ ICAILKS $2.r)0 

TRLNCll COATS s.{.I.i .n,l $\iX> i 

Bfiots, Spurs, Hoot Jacks .md ]i<,i,\ \\,,n\is 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



SHOES FOR COLLEGE WOMEN 

New dainty Knna Jetfick Ties and I'lmips in Mack and r.'cli 
shades of hrowii . . . ,«;}. }(j and sr,.(l(f 

"AS YOLf LIKK IT" HOSFKRY 
In fall shades of brown, chifTon ,ind semi-service weights 7<Jc 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



PRICES ARE MUCH LOWER THLS YEAR 

. . . BLT THE OtALITY IS THE SAME 

Nunn-Bush Shoes §7.00— Schoble Hats -S'j.OO— Langrock Clothes S.'io.OO 
Imported Wool Hose 7.')C and SI. 00 



E. M. SWITZER JR., Inc, 



II 



U. A. C. U^)rary. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13. 1932 



NETTLETON AND MILLER COOK 

Miller Cock Shoes m the new fall styles and at the new reduced prices are the best value we have ever 



offered, (f We know th^re^FFclK^^sluies than Miller Cook-TT-bui . . The rabbit dues mrt reailr 
roiiu- out of the empty hat. One dollar never boujiht more than 100 cents in value and never will. 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



TERM SYSTEM IN USE 

SINCE FALL OF 1016 

(Continued from Paft* 1) 

(2) Parents whose thiUlren were drop- 
IM-d at th«- «n<l of the first term, freshmen 
year, complained that the stu.lent did 
not have sufficient time to show his 
ability to stay in colleKf in tln' t^-n week 
period. As this is partly true, the abuse 
will be eliminated throui^h the new plan. 

(3) Final examination time and the 
week previous wear the resources of biith 
student and teacher away. The semester 
system reduces the number of these 
ordeals. 

(4) A great deal of time is wasted 
each term in registration, getting ac- 
customed to new classes, assigning seats, 
lockers, etc. With the term, work has no 
sooner commence.! than it seems finished. 

(f)) The modern educational trend is 
away from emphasis on marks, credit, 
etc. The term system calling for so many 
marking i)eriods focusses all attention of 
students on credits and marks. 

(«i) Students who plan to teach and 
to enter me<lical schools cannot cover 
enough of subject matter in one term to 
meet the semester-hour recjuirements. 

(7) Exams held before Christmas re- 
veal hurried preparation, and hurried 
writing. This is so the student can begin 
his vacation early. Under the semester 
plan there are no vacations at the end of 
the first semester. 

(K) Registrars of other colleges dis- 
criminate between our students who 
applv to graduate sch(M)ls and others be- 
cause of the complexity of our students 
transiript. Twenty-one of the twenty- 
four lea<ling New Knglan.l colleges are 
using the semester plan. New Hampshire, 
Simons, and Mass. State are the three on 
the term basis. 
(B) From the administration viewpoint: 

(1) The semester system eliminates 
one-third of the re(iuired work of the 
Dean's, registr.ir's, and treasurer's otVues. 
Kx|Hnditures are also reduced. 

(2) The term brings much disorgani- 
zation in these othces with interviews 
with parents of failed children, with stu- 
<lents on probation, transfers, etc. 

Changing from the t.rm to the semester 
basis necessitates changes in the course of 
study in the departments. .Although the 
winter term is eliminated, no courses 
were dropped from the ( urrii ulum. Most 
of them were absorbed into new courses 
or into elaborations of the old. A few of 
the im,)ortant changes are: .Agricultural 
Economics '2i\ liecomes Economic (ieo- 
graphy 2.') and is no longer rcrpiired but 
a di i ional eL'cti^e. The sin rU- term 



BUSH AND SlIEFF 

SCORE TOUCHDOWNS 
(Continued from Pafte i) 



(juarter. Hush hurled two l(»ng passes to 
Mountain, the second forward |)laciiig 
the ball on the Middh-bury four-yard line. 
.After two unsuccessful thrusts at the 
Middlebury line. Hush smashed through 
tackle for the first State touchdown. 
ShetT successfully kicked the extra point 
to place the Massachusetts eleven in the 
lead. 7-t). In the third period, State 
scored its second touchdown after a 
steady drive down the field had placed 
the ball deep in the Middlebury territory. 
White hurled a 19-yard pass to ShefT 
who raced six yards for the touchdown. 
Sheff failed to kick the extra point. 

The defensive work of Captain Leary. 
Sievers, Smith, and Mountain stood out 
in the State line while ShetT, White and 
Hush did the best ball-carrying for State. 

The line-up: 

Ma«8. State Middlebury 

Mountain, le , '*• ^/'^'^f " 

Sievira. Guwozsicy. Cummings. It rt. Matitan 

Burke. Lcavitt. Ig rtj. Lovell. Whitney 

Bkkford. Sibson, rK U. Wright, Jocelyn 

Mulhall. Nietupsen. Sievers. rl c. «^r,i 

It. Ricio. Stafford 
Smith, Ryan, re ^ •«, ReiJ 

BIkpIow, Lojko. McKelllgott, nb 

qb. Veomans, Wilhams 

Sheff. Wliite. Ihb ,'^]^' V"^\: S""'"t 

Husli rlib Ihb. Boehm. Stefaniak 

Kriga'rd. Coburn, fb fb. Hartrey. Anderson 



courses under the present system will be 
enlarged in scope, such as required sopho- 
more economics and freshman botany. 
Two terms of freshman rc(iuired chem- 
istry become one required semester with 
the choice in the following semester of 
choosing chemistry or orientation. Only 
three credits will be allowed for chemistry. 
Sophomore lx)tany is no longer reciuired, 
part of it having been incorporated into 
botany two. The fnld numbered courses 
in the new plan will be given during the 
first semester. The even numbered will 
be given during the second semester. 
Only two-thirds of the present required 
graduation credits will be needed to 
secure a diploma. 

The tentative calentlar for next year is 
as follows: 

19:w 

Monday, September 18 

Kir>t senieslir Ix-nins for freshmen 
Wednesday, Seplemb.-r JO 

First semester bruins for upiK-rclassmen 
Saturday. i>eieml)er 20 

Christmas recess iK'gins 

i<i;u 

Tiiesflay. January 2 

Christmas Recess enils 
Saturday. Ketiruary '.i 

Kirst S«-mester ends 
Mondav. February '> 

Second Seuie>ter begins 
Saturday. March lU to .Monday, April 9 

Faster Vacation 
Friday. J urn- N to Monday. June U 

Commencement 



HUGH P. BAKER, NEW PRESIDENT 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

that institution. From UM)7 to 1912 he 
held a similar position at the I'ennsyl- 
vania State College, and in 1912 the 
state of New York called him to organize 
the State College of Forestry to be 
athliated with the University of Syracuse. 
He served in the capacity of dean at the 
Syracuse institution until 1920 with the 
exception of the war periotl. During the 
war he was an officer with the 4»)th 
infantry and a member of the army 
general staff. 

In 1920 Mr. Baker left the academic 
field to become executive secretary of 
the American Paper and Pulp Associ- 
ation. He served with this association 
until 192S when he accepted the position 
of manager of the Trade Association de- 
partment of the Uaited State Chamber 
of Commerce. 

College work again claimed him in \9'M) 
when he was recalled to Syracuse to take 
up his former responsibilities as dean. 
Under his leadership the State College 
of Forestry has grown in prominence and 
has filled an increasingly important place 
in the field of higher technical education. 
Dr. Haker's successful experience in ad- 
ministrating the affairs of the State 
College of Forestry in New York and 
in the business world should prejjare him 
unusually well to meet the problems of 
the Massachusetts State College where 
the increasing demand for resident in- 
struction constitutes one of the larger 
problems facing the new administration, 
declares (ieorge H. Ellis of West Newton, 
vice-president of the board of trustees. 

The newly elected president of the 
State College is brother of Ray Stannard 
Haker, better known as David (irayson. 



NEW CHORUS A'lTRACTS 

MUCH STUDENT INTEREST 
(Continued from Page 1) 

play for all numbers except those sung 
in A Cappella style (unaccompanied). 
"Come and have a gotxl time," says 
Director Dunham. 



The present members: 



SOPRANOS— Alice Hopkins "M. Charlotte 
Casey '.i4, Ruth Avery "3.">, Virginia Smith '36. 
CImrlotte Miller "M. Louise (Javone 'M. 

ALTOS— Ruth Pushee 'M. ( harlot te Sleep .1.). 
Mae Winer "Mi, Sylvia Rod ':i.'). I'riscilla King 30. 
Margaret Hutchinson :«>. Maida RigK» 3*>. 
Kvelyn Mallory ':if). Beatrice Rafter 36. L. 
Jackson ':J6. Ruth Redman ■:i4. 

TENORS— James Clapp 36, David Cosgriff 
'34 Lewis IX'Wilde '36. Paul Stephansen 34. 
Aedin C. Hickson 'Mi. F:dward Law "M, RoKer 
Bates '34. Merrill Hebard 'Mi, Thomas Lord '.ib. 
John C. Barter ".i'-i, (Jliver J. Brennan "M. Hillman 
H. Wordell '34. Glenn F. Shaw '3o. 

BASSF.S— Descoin Hoagland .54. Thurl D. 
Brown '34. Arthur Oreen ':i4. Roger .Mlon 34, 
Ciordon Whaley '.'{6, Uonalil Donnelly 36. Dante 
Zuckor ".i'y, Fred Bull '.Vi. Carl P. Wildner ".iii. 
Steadman '3.-i. \ernon A. Bell :ir>. Ralph <'ranKer 
•3.") J W. Hall ".Hi. Wm. Chilson ".'{6. Bunker llill 
»34'. Allan B. EUind '36, H. W. Walker •;J4. 

Class of '34— A. Lucey, W. Lister. C. Coombs, 
B. Weinberger. A. Hoffman. J. Zlllman. VV . 
Kozlowski. R. Noble. C. MacMackin. 

Class of ■3.->— J. Kldridge. C. { ross P ( lark. 
S. Bliss, J. Veerling, W. Scott, A. (.old. \ Bell. 

Class of "M — H. Pratt. V. Adams. M. Chase. 
H Ferguson. W. Chilson. H Miceraelson, O. 
Trask, R. Dimoch. A. Kaufman, R. Kulya, F. 
Congdon. N. Laubenstein. R. Thompson, ( . 
Marsh. K. Macek. K. Farrell. G. N'assos, R. 
Costello, L. Sandler. M. Vidiborsky. 



FIRST SOCIAL UNION 

TO BE HELD NO\ 17 
(Continued from Pafte I) 

song, the melodies of which have n-n 
the source of insj)iration for many (■, > ras 
and symphonies. 

Russia's folk songs are of great si mfi. 
cance, in that they represent the lit' .mil 
customs of the people, and are 8|X)iii im.. 
ous authentic creations in artistic .,rm 



IDA M. BRIDGEMAN 

(iraduate of New England Conservatory 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67- J Amherst, Mass, 



A^HERS 

r^^ THf-ATIU- ^ 



NUTMEGGERS HAVE 

LIGHT, FAST TEAM 
(Continued from Pate 3) 

take Flddy's place at tackle. On the right 
side of the line, Wandy will play guard 
and Coss will start at tackle. Coach 
Dole, attempting to develop some scoring 
punch in his backfield, will start Kelly, 
List year's freshman star, at halfback. 
The Connecticut State eleven is a rather 
light combine but has several speedy 
halfbacks and a fast line. 

Mel Taube has scrimmaged his team 
hard all the week in preparation for 
Saturday's tussle and will place his 
strongest team on the field against the 
Hlue and White eleven. 

The i)robable line-ups: 
Massachusett!! State Connecticut State 



The rendition is governed by nuxM mij 
circumstance, and the songs must In jur 
formed with all their characteristic ii u^u 
larities and imperfections of harmonv .md 
rhythm, each a law unto itself. It 1- 1km 
left to the dramatic artist, unhaiiii« rd 
by conventional style, to interpret with 
freedom this music, born of the soul uf a 
1 y)eople. 

I Walevitch's birthplace was Od. -^ 
1 that beautiful city through which pas, 
many races — the peasant artisan Irom 
the Volga, the miner from the Ural, the 
Merchant from the Caspian Sea, the 
nomads, the Khirghiz from the Monnolian 
steppes, and the never-to-be-forKotten 
convict ships- all of which are the 
source of the tieep knowledge and uinlcr 
standing that Walevitch brings to hi> 
music. .All this, ami more, is conveved in 
his powerful, dramatic presentation oi 
the songs of his people. 



M.S. C. MliNS MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

"Let Dave do it" 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



First Class Work Low Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



PATRONIZE 
THL SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



'I hurs. October 1.^ 

Thrilling - Btautiful - Exotic 



"BIRD OF PARADISE" 

with 
DOLORES DEI. RIO- JOEI. McCREA 



Friday. October 14 

EDMUND LOWE — in- 

"CHANDU, 
The MAGICIAN" 



Everything in Hardware 

and Radio Equipment 

— PHlLCO= 



Saturday. Oct. 15 

RICHARD CROMWELL — 

DOR IHV JORDAN — in- 

"THAl'S MY BOY" 

Monday. October 17 



Mountain. It- 
Sievers, It 
LxMvilt. Ik 
U-ary. c (Cajit.) 
Biikforcl. rK 
CuniininK^, rt 
Sniitli. re 
BiKelow. <\\) 
Shelf, rhh 
Bush. Il>l> 
FriKard, fb 



re, t"oe 

r'.. Coss 

TR, Wandy 

c, Wilkinson 

Ik. Vesukiewii-z 

It, .Allard 

le, Ed<ly 

qb, K re mi I 

rhb. Kelly 

Ihb, I'ierie 

fb, Cronin 



AND = 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



FRANK BUCKS 

''BRING 'EM BACK ALIVE' 



1 uesday. Octobe r 18_ 
~ CHARLES BICKFORD 

Constance Cummings 
— in — 

"THE LAST MAN" 



Wednesday, (^ct. 19 

F.DW.ARI) (i. ROBINSON 



whose h«)nie is in .Amherst. Dr. Baker 
is a fellow in the .American Assot iation 
for .Advantenient of Seience, a member 
of the ( .eoKraphical S<Kiety of London 
and the American CieoKra|)hical Society, 
of the Anv rican Society of Foresters, and 
is a member of the Masonic order. 



CROSS-COUNTRY TEAMS 

HAVE WON 25 OUT OF J* 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

they were the only defeats of the year. 
Twice the Derby-coached men havf 
scored grand slams- that is the seven 
State men have crossed the line hifore 
any of the opponents. One of tliesi' was 
against .Amherst in l*.t2(i, and the other 
time was in 1!>2."), when in the WontMtr 
Tech meet the seven men— then from 
Aggie- crossed the line hand-in-hand. 

COLLEGIAN C:OM PETITION 

Editor W. Ray Ward is conduct Iiik thi 
annual fall competition for freshmen and 
upperclassmen who wish to secure plans 
on the editorial stalT of the Collepmi. 

Last Thursday evening a brief nuttinj 
was held in the Collegian offi<-e and canili- 
dates were given assignments. Fourtetn 
students reported including fn-shnien. 
sophomores, and juniors. Other stiidetil" 
interested in journalistic work and wli" 
were unable to attend the last nuttinij 
are stil eligible to enter the comfKiiiion 
by reporting at the Colleginn othce on 
Thursday evening, Oct. V.\, at 7.:«) pm 



ALL WOOL BLANKETS-PASTEL COLORS 
$2.95 each 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATM, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST. - MASS. 



Have you tried 
A SCOTCHMEN'S OMKLKT 

Served only at 

BUCK DEADY'S? 



-m- 



'TIGER SHARK" 



SANG I I \r. HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REI AIRINC, AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASH.NG DONE AT REASONABLE I RICES 

Our Laundry First i lass 

Our VolicyCuaranl td 

NtXT TO THI- TOWN IIM I 



Full Line of Riding Habits, 

Boots. Breeches, Coats, and Sweaters for Ladies and Gentlemen. 

All kinds of Sport Wear for Students at Special Prices. 

COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 



Feels great to have your hair 
shampooed after a haircut! 

The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 



TYrLWRlTl.KS 
lor Sale and for Kent 

H E. DAVID 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHl N 

''The finest eating place in AmhersC' 

SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 

INCORPORATED 






<> 



f A CURRENT EVENT 
IN THE COLLE(;iAN 

Read what Dr. Graves wrote 
to l>r. Thatcher concerning 
Ur. Uufth P. Bilker. n«w|y 
appointed Prenltlent o( this 

cullefte. 



^H 



/BSaseacfous' 



'.^.^ 




OUT.STANUINC; EVENT 
or THE WEEK 



HToTlegtan 



l.ituU Hush uUiiln rluvs to 
the |M>«ltlon of leudlnit hlilh 

points. 



Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1932 



Number 4 



Three Hundred Students 
Celebrate Mountain Day 



Spend Day on Mt. Toby Despite 
Unfavorable Weather 



Mountain Day this year resumed its 
former place as an important student 
holiday when, in spite of the far from 
i.liMl weather, over three hundred climbed 
Mt. Toby on October 12 to join in the 
^jitieral merry-making at the top. There 
was plenty of enthusiasm although fog 
.shut out the view of the valleys, fall 
colors were far from their best, and a 
cold wind with rain was decidedly un- 
comfortable. 

Husses left the College Inn at 8.30, 
*•.:<() and 10 o'clock carrying climbers to 
the foot of the mountain where members 
of the Outing Club acted as guides for 
the various trails. Several members of 
the Military department went up on 
horseback and many cars were driven up 
as far as the mountain trails. More 
|)eoi)le visited the mountain than have 
(iisturhcd the silences there since the fall 
of l'.t29. 

l.unch consisting of hot dogs, rolls, 
(lounhiiuts, grapes, apples, and cider was 
served to a long line by representatives 
from the cafeteria. Several fires provided 
warmth as well as ciwking facilities. 
.\fler lunch a log chopping contest pro- 
videil an entertaining interval. After 
si)ee<ly wielding by five husky wood- 
choppers, the axe broke, putting a 
suihlen end to the contest. There was 
no substitute axe. "Dave" Crosby was 
decl.ired winner, time: Im. .")s. Follow- 
(Contlnued on Page 2, Column i) 



ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES 
FINANCIAL REPORT 

For Year Ending June 30. 19i2 



The .\cademics Activities Board makes 
the following financial report for the year 
ending June .'JO, 10.S2: 





Receipts 


Expend. 


Hill a nee 


Collegian 


$;}.">:i7 . (M) 


*2988 14 


$.'>4S 92 


Band 


(178.28 


10 (H) 


Otis 28 


Chorus 


19.5.91 


30.3 .')<> 


-107.05 


Roister 








Doisters 


1074.82 


714.13 


300 09 


Orchest ra 


.^5.9.5 


.10 43 


-14 48 


Index ';{;{ 


2<>70.41 


24tK) r)9 


179 82 


Index '34 




0.02 


s.m 


Debating 


207 0.') 


l.')0 52 


nt) r<i 


(ieneral 


1891.12 


981 03 


910 (W 



Singing and Cheering 

Practiced At Assembly 

.Senate Hopes to See Improvement 
at W.IM. Game 



("heering and singing practice in prepa 
r.ition for the first home game in four 
weeks was held at the Senate student 
assembly Wednes<lay afternoon. 

.After Senate announcements, the song 
.md iheer leaders led the con\-<>cation in 
cheers and songs. .Mimeograph copies of 
the songs and cheers were distributed in 
order to refresh the memory of the upjier 
classmen and to aid the freshmen in 
memorizing. Phil Stephans, Benjamin 
Oe'ts, and Costas Caragianais were the 
leaders. The college band, with new- 
arrangements of the "Victory March," 
and "Fight, Massachusetts" recently 
completed by \V. (irant Dunham, di- 
rt'<ti)r, played for the singing. 

it is hopefi by the Senate that this 
meeting will improve the cheering at the 
\\ in ester Tech game on Saturday. 



Totals $102<»0 . 00 $7701 02 $2.'>89 .IS 
The .Academics tax, as votetl by the 
student botly a few years ago and as 
collected in 1932-.33, is JCIO. This 
includes: 

(Continued on Page 3. Column 2) 



ATHLETIC BOARD ACTS 
ON FREE ADMISSIONS 



Concert Members Hear 

Tibbett in Springfield 

\ ' iroximately .300 members of the 

^ r t Community Concert Association 

V 7.") State College students heart! 

' Tibbett, leading baritone of 

ropolitan Opera Company, pre- 

irogram in the .Springfield muni- 

iiturium last Friday night. 

nee Tibbett was the first artist 

ir on the Springfield program, 

'■ '■ to which is obtained by mem- 

n the association. Amher.st 

ire ;illowed to attend these 

"ti their .\mherst membership 

>ro^ram contained in part: Care, 

' ■: 'It fri>,n .\fe; Air from Comus ; 

■I 'th entered thy Heart; Deep 

i.dward; )e HaUelujak Rhythm. 

Tibbett was called for an encore 

V .1 iTi) „.r. and after the final 

everal encores which 

ally a,jprev iated by the audience. 

>t..vart ,v I, •, accompanist at the 

1 i>e,i tAo solos: La Terrasse des 

i. Lune, by Debussy, 

'i . i . .\'o. 2 by Dohnanyi. 



Complimentary Tickets Now Avail- 
able Only for Players' Families 
and Visitinit (loaches 

Drastic reduction in the number of 
com|)limentary tickets available to mem- 
bers of varsity teams is the result of a 
recent action of the Joint Committee on 
Intercollegiate .Athletics intended to elim- 
inate some of the abuses which have <le- 
veloped in the use of complimentary 
tickets to games both at h<mie and at 
other colleges. 

This iiction comes largely as the result 
of the pr<jposal from Tufts College to 
estal)lish the custom of refusing passes to 
members of visiting teams for the use of 
their friends. Professor Curry S. Hicks, 
General Manager of Athletics, has been 
authorized by the connnittee, known 
usually as the .Athletic Board, to make 
the same proposal to other colleges with 
which Mass. State scheflules games. 

Several of these, including R.P.I. 
and VV'.P.I. have already accepte<l 
the proposition. The action of the com- 
mittee alscj restricts the issuing of com- 
I)linKntary tickets for home contests by 
providing that members of teams may 
obtain passes only for memljers of their 
immediate families by applying directly 
to'the general manager of athleti< s. 

In explaining the action of the .Athletics 
Board, Professor Hicks said that it did 
not seem advisable to continue to give 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 3) 



AMHER.ST GAME 

Reserved seat tickets for the football 
game with .Amherst are now on sale at 
the main office, Physical Education 
Building. 

The established [)ri(e for reserverl 
seats at this gaine is .S2.00 plus 20c tax. 
total 12.20. 

Holders of undergraduate Student 
.Activities Tickets may exchange their 
tickets for reserved seat tickets u|)on 
payment of $1.(M). plus 10c tax; total 
.?1.10. Only holders of Student Ac- 
tivities Tickets will be ailmitted to 
the Mass. State Cheering Section. 

.All exchange of tickets must be made 
at this office before 11 a.m., Saturday. 
October 29th. 

Mail orders for tickets will be ac- 
cepted and the tickets mailed provided 
order is accompanied by check for full 
amount. This offi :e will not be re- 
sponsible for loss of tickets in the mail. 
If yoa desire to have your tickets sent 
by registered mail, please add the cost 
of registry to the amount of your 
check. 



EXrRAC/r FROM IKIIKR 

of Dr. Frank Pierrepont ( iraves, Com- 
missioner of ICducation, St.ite of New 
York, written to Dr. Thatcher, June 
17, 19.32. 



"Dr. Baker is ex.acth the ni.m I 
should seek if I were in your position. 
1 sh.dl, however, as a trustee, do e\ery- 
thing I can to keep him at Syracuse. 
He has ability, training, experience, 
personalitN , ideals, and force t)f char- 
acter which make him one of the best 
n>en available in the it)untr>' for the 
headship of a liberal or technical col- 
lege. I hope that we sh.ill be able to 
retain him at Syr.icuse, but <lo not 
know where you c»)uld get a better 
man for your purpose. It will be a 
favor to us if y(»u will let him stay, 
but I do not feel anyone would be 
justified in standing in his way if he 
decides that he ought to go." 



Four Concerts Planned 

By Local Association 

llifth Caliber Talent to Take Part in 
Coming Season 

Four concerts will be sponsored by the 
.Amherst Community Concert Assixiation 
during the coming year according to an 
announiement made by Pr<ifessor Frank 
A. Waugh, President of the .Ass(Miation. 
If the New ^'ork i)!ti<e (ontirms these 
engagements, the following artists will l)e 
heard during the 1932-1933 season: 
Brosa String (Juartet of London; Toscha 
Seidel, violinist; l.eo, J.m, and .Misdiel 
Cherniavsky, trio; and Nelson Kddy, 
baritone. 

The Brosa String (Juartet of London 
will pl.iy here at Amherst sometime 
during December. This group is con- 
sidereil by many international critics as 
the most outstanding s(ring (piartet in 
the world. They jiresented a concert at 
the .Smith College C<mcert S4Ties last 
ye.ir and stored such a success that they 
have been engaged for two concerts in 
this year's series at North.impton. Two 
engagements in the Siune musical series 
with a month intervening is perhaps 
without prece<lent <jn the concert stage 
for any string quartet. 

Toscha Sei«lel, who studied under 
Leop<jld Auer along with Albert Spalding, 
V'ehudi .Menuhin, and other great artists 
of the violin will give his conct-rt in 
January. He is considered the heail-liner 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 2) 

INFORMAL TO BE HELD 
AFTER W. P. /. GAME 

Drill Mall Will Be Scene of 
Gala Affair 

Football will be the atmosphere of the 
Worcester Te h Informal which will be 
held in the Drill li.dl Saturday night at 
7.30 o'clock. 

All members of the Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute f«)otball team and any 
students from the school who attend the 
game will be admitted free. The admis- 
sion for students of this college and the 
public, whi< h is invited to attend, is $2,00 
per couple plus the federal tax. The 
.Amherst Sercnaders will play for the 
dance which will be chaiK-roned by Mr, 
and .Mrs. Melvin Taube and Mr. and 
Mrs. Emory (irayson. Decorations will 
give the effect of a football field with its 
color, noise, and crowd. 

Tickets may be sejured from the 
folloAing members of the Informal Com- 
m.ittec: Walter Madinn, chairman, Nel- 
son Beel.r, Kfiward Harvey, and Carleton 
MacMackin. 



NOTICE 

Owing to the congestion caused by the 
extra large number of students and 
limited class rooms, classes will begin at 
8.:{0 next term ancj end at 5 o'clmk the 
same as this term with the exception 
that they will run through the nwin 
hour. There will be no definite dinner 
hour as previously between 12..'50an<l 1.30. 



Political League Formed ; 
To Include Three Parties 



DAD'S DAY PROGRAM 
NEARING COMPLETION 

Many Interestintl Features to Show 
Visiting Parents College Life 

With the complete program of Dad's 
Day assuming a definite form, .is out- 
lined by conunittee-c hairm.in Cost.is 
Caragianis in a short talk during chapel 
exercises last Monday, interest in the 
affair is rapidly growing. As Caragianis 
emphasized, Dad's Day has become one 
of the cherished traditions on campus, 
and stands like Mother's Day of the 
spring term, as a recl-U-tter event of the 
fall term. The sHccess of the day in the 
past may be traced largely to the nuitual 
desire of parents and instructors to meet, 
and to the co-operation of students in 
showing the Dads around the campus on 
a day when college is in full swing. 

I'rospects for a guest tlay of unusual 
interest were entertained by the ctim- 
mittee when it was aimoinued that 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column I) 

ORCHESTRAPLANS 
INDICATE BUSY YEAR 

To be Directed by Edf^ar .Sorton and 
Manaiied by Ruth Pushee 



With fcjrly pieces as a nu< leus for one 
of the best organizations of its kind on 
campus in renent years, the College 
( )rchestra is well on its way to a repetition 
of the success whic h it enjoyed last >ei(r. 
Edgar Sorton '.33, again elected director 
by the Academics Bo.ird, is |)utting nuM h 
time anci thought intc> the selection of the 
best in classical and semi-classical nmsic. 
As a graduate of the New England Con- 
servatory c»f .Music, Mr. Sjrton has shown 
in his work the artistry which his train- 
ing with many instruments, notably the 
violin, has gi\en him. He will be assisted 
this year by the new manager, Mi.ss 
Ruth Pushee '34, who is a pianist «»f 
finesse, and a member of the chorus. 
Roger Bates '.'{4, college organist and 
accompianist of the chorus, will preside 
again at the piano. 

Plans for the year in orchestral work 
include ap|)earance8 at college ()lays. Bay 
State R'.vic-w, Dad's Day entertainment, 
High School Day, and various incidental 
ap|)earance8. Of most interest, however, 
will be the annual concert, given entirely 
by the orchestra sometime in the spring 
term. Work in the three rehearsals so 
far has included practice on the m.iteri.il 
<jf last year as well as playing of Beet 
hoven's famous Fifth Symphony. Waltzes 
of Brahms, Schubert's Unfinished .Sym. 
(Continued on Pafte 2, Column iS) 



CAM PL'S CALENDAR 



He still sad heart, and cease repininf; 
lifhind the tlouds the sun is shiniHg; 
Thy fate is the tummon fate of all, 
Intij earh life some rain must fall. 
Some diiyi must be dark and dreary. 

— Ijunefellifw, An April Kay 

Thunday, October 30 

7.00 p.m. Freshmen Enlcrtainmpnt ami 

(V>-c(l Dance 
7..'J0 i),m. (ollciiian Competition 
Saturday. October 22 

2,.'K) p.m. Varsity Koottjall, Worcester Tech 

at Alumni Field 
.■{Of)p.m. Cross-fountry, Worcrester Tech, 

here 
".."JO p.m. Worcester Tech Informal. Drill 
ll.ill 
.Sunday, October 2i 

2 (Kip I", Outing Club Hike, .Vft. Holyoke 

Kanxe 
H,(X) pm. Philharmonic Concert. .Memorial 
Hall 
Monday, October 24 

h.OO p,m, JSand Kilnarsal 
«,.'J0 p.m, (ilee (hit) 
Tueaday. October 25 

8,(10 pm, ( horus. Memorial Hall 
Wedneitday, fKrtnber 26 

.').:)() p tn. K '). ,\I<-.(irm. Drai«er Hall 
8 (JO pm. OrilicHtra Rche-.ir'ial. Sto< kl)rifl({e 
Thuraday. r>ctober 27 

3,1.") pm, \'ar«it> Sfx yi-r. Amher»t, here 



Will Conduct Presidential Campaign 
Followed by .Straw \t>te 

Robert Stanley Hosford '33 has been 
.ippciinted c:hairiiian of the non partizan 
Politic d League which has been formed 
to conduct cm cam|)us the presidential 
c,im|>aigns of the major political parties. 
This campaign will end with a straw \-ote 
to be conducted by the .Massmhtisetts 
Collef^iiin just before election day in 
Novend)er. 

Samml U, dilmorc '.33 is the leader of 
the Republican section of the league, 
while Willi.im M. Semanie '.33 heads the 
.ScK-ialists, and Myles Boylan '30 leads 
the Democrats. 1 hese three men con- 
stitute the Executive Connnittee of the 
Political League and are making arrange- 
ments to conduct the campaigns of their 
respective parties. Although any |M»liti- 
cal party may be represented in the 
league, no one has yet been found to 
rej)resent the Communist party or any of 
the fi\e other minor parties. 

Pl.uis of the League indicate that the 
objective of each section is not merely to 
get more \c)tes for its party's candidate 
on cdection day, but to overcome scjnie 
of the indifference of State College stu- 
dents to alf.iirs of nation. d imporl.ince 
and to move them to intelligent and 
interested |H>litical action. 

ICach section will provide at least one 
speiiker to set forth the principles and 
aims of his |>arty and will provide litera- 
ture and campaign buttons for distri- 
bution. Although it is not yet definitely 
known who an\ of the speakers will be, 
.S. Ralph Harlow, popular professor of 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column I) 

Dairy Judging Team 

Leaves For Detroit 

Moody, .Sbepard and Taft to 'I'ake 
Part in .National Contest 



Ch.irles W. McMwly of Piltsfield, Sidney 
Shcpard of .Maiden, and Robert T.ift of 
.Mendcin, all mend>ers of the class of Wt'Xl 
and of the Massachusetts State Ccjilege 
clair\ prcwlucts judging team left I'riday 
morning for Detroit to c'om|N-te in the 
national contest sponsored by the Na- 
tional Dairy and Ice- Cn-am Manufac- 
turing ancI Supplies Association. Prcjf. 
J. H. Frandsen, head of the department 
at the college, drove the boys to Detroit. 

The .Mass;ichu setts team placecl fc)urth 
last year at the national contest, placing 
third this year at the- Eastern States 
Ex|)C)sition ;it Springfield. About twenty 
learns I'ompc-te in the nation. il contest 
according to Merrill J. Mack ancl Harry 
L. Linclcpiist of the clc-p.irt nie-nt who 
coac hed the l>oys for judging work. 

Six fT.'iO scholarships are offered in the 
national contest. A Mass;ic husetts boy 
won one of these scholarships last year 
but could not t.ike .iclvantage of it. 

Christian Association to 
Launch Membership Drive 

.\t a meeting Thursday evening the 
Christi.in Association will launch its 
drive for new nic-mbers. I'ntil last year 
every member of the school was theo- 
retically a member of this organization. 
Now only those- who are interested in the 
pur[M>ses ancl projc-cts of the .•XsscK'iation 
are to be asked to become members. It 
is thought by the members of the Cabinet, 
tlie nucleus of the organiz-uion, that a 
smallc-r group cif intc-rested stuclents will 
procluce better results than have been 
attained in the past. 

The drive will ccjntinuc: tfirough the 
week and while it will be cjuiet. it will be 
thorough. Plans are under way whereby 
I every man on campus wdl Im.* interviewed 
'concerning the Asscxiation. luich fra- 
ternity ancl dornntory will have it* 
solicitor ancl sevc-ral will lie .as.^igned to 
the students who live in neither place. 



Ai9:!vs oaDi w I f nd 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1932 



i 





THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGL\N, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, \9U 



/Ilbassacbusetll* CoUegian 



Official ncwsjjaiier of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



BOARD OF KDlTOkS 



W. Raymond Ward "Xi 
Edittir-in-Chief 



EUt.ENE CiUHALMCK '33 
Managing Editor 



Alfkeda L. Okdwav "33 
Associalt Editor 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 
Editorial 
W, Raymond Ward '33 
Gampua Athletic* 

Raymond Royal '34. Editor Thkodokb M. Lbary 3o 

Alfreda L. Ordway "33 Silas Little. Jr. 35 

Ruth D. Campbell '34 
Harriette M. Jackson '34 

Mary L. Allen '35 „ . 

David L. Arenberg '35 ^ EjchanUe* 

Elieaubth K. Hakrinoton 35 Alfreda L. Ordway '33. Editor 

Feature 
Stanly F. Sepkrski '34 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
Advertising Manager 

Frank Batstone '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. Gurnev '33 

liusiness Manager 



Business Assistants 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Manager 

W. Lawrence Schenck '34 



Subscriptions ■1;2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. .^ 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917, authorired August 20. 19 IS. 



<^ ^ -^ EDITORIALS 



* * * 



THE GREAT REVIVAL 

Mountain Day has come back! With over three hundred students, together with 
professors, horses, wagons, free eats, woodrhoppers, and "Dean" Burns, Mt. Toby 
seemed once more to be truly the playground t)f the college. 

Mountain Day is an institution that is well worth preserving. We remember the 
Mountain Day of 1929 as the most significant event of our freshman year. It was 
our first opportunity, after the mad whirl of the first few weeks of college life had 
died down, to rest in our lal)ors and look leisurely about us, to meet a few of the 
professors informally, to make friends in an environment that was, for the first time 
since the opening of college, not artificial, and to discover the beauties and charms 
and the opportunities for wholesome recreation that are hidden in the fields, streams, 
and woods of the country round about our college home. 

There was plenty of enthusiasm this year, in spite of the cold wind and rain, but 
how much better it would have been if the tlay had been clear and bright and s|iark- 
ling! The weather obeys no man, but a fine Mountain Day could be assured if it 
were again made a |)leasant surprise announced only by the glad sound of the chapel 
bell. Don't you think it would be worth-while? 



THE AGORA 

Only dead men are satisfied, it has bee.i said. The noticeable lack of any recent 
student contribution to the Agora might be taken as an indication of complete s;itis- 
faction with conditions that prevail on this campus. But we know that you students 
aren't satisfieil. There are many things you want done away with; there are many 
others you would like to see improved; there are new itieas that should be acted 
upon; there are differences of opinion that should be aired and possibly cleared up. 

Don't tell us thut every one is satisfied with the actions of the Senate, with com- 
pulsory military training, morning chajn-l. the marking system, the parking regu- 
lations, the Cafeteria, the jiestilence of Hies the inroads of "the dread germ of Social- 
ism," the Collegian, and with everything else on campus! Are you just bashful, or 
do you feel that it will do no gcKxl to write anything anyway? 

Remember what Professor Lanphear once said. "The scjueaking wheel gets the 
grease." The way to get what you want is to speak for it. The Agora provides a 
place for our readers, most of whom are students, to express their opinions and ideas 
and to ask for what they want. 

We would request, however, that contributors limit themselves to five hundred 
words and show^ due respect for the personalities of others. The Collegian takes no 
respoisibility for the ideas expressed in any contribution. The Editor must know 
the name of each contributor, but it will be witheld upon request. 



ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES 

In this issue we are publishing the Financial Report of Academic Activities for 
the year ending June 30, 1932. This should be of interest to all students, as it con- 
cerns money they have provided. We would suggest that the Athletics Board pro- 
vide for the publication of a similar report. 



EDITORIAL MISCELLANEA 

The Band seems to be rolling in money, while the Orchestra and Chorus are in 
debt. Now why not change the Band Tax to a Music Tax and divide it up? 



What this campus needs is a Communist to make the Socialists look respectable. 



If it should so hapiwn that a student would like to take both a fourth and fifth 
hour class next term, we'd like to know how he would find time for lunch! 



At B.r. apples are sold by a slot machine. Here they are sold on the Honor 
System. .And it works! The promotors of the idea report that at the end of the 
first day every nickel was present, anti that over a bushel of apples had been sold. 



Two dollars and twenty cents for the Worcester Tech Informal seems a bit ex- 
pensiv^e — especially during this depression. 



Rumor has it that many of the fraternities keep the high cost of boarding down 
by raiding various gardens and orchards under the cover of darkness. That big 
police dog the night watchman has ought to be sent over to watch the east side of 
the campus and taught to p.iy spoii.il attention to the vegetable gardens and the 
orchards. 



Two students have been suspended from the University of Maryland for con- 
scientious objection to compulsory military training. We are thankful that such 
things do not happen at Mass. State in this enlightened day and age. We cannot 
imagine the occurrence of such an injustice at this college. 



Who has the reddest hair on campus, 
"Red" Crawford or "Red" O'Mara? 

, ss — ■ — 

WOMAN analyze:!) 

After years of patient study and re- 
search, a chemist (male) reports his dis- 
coveries. 

Symbol— W.O.A., a member of the 
human family. 

Occurrence— found wherever man ex- 
ists. 

Physical properties— all colors and 
sizes. Always appears in disguised con- 
dition. Surface of face seldom unpro- 
tected by coating or film of powder. 
Boils at nothing and may freeze at any 
moment. However melts when properly 
treated. Very bitter if not used correctly. 
Chemical properties -extremely active. 
Possesses great affinity for gold, silver, 
platinum an<l precious stones. Violent 
reaction when left alone by men. Ability 
to absorb all sorts of expensive fotxl. 
Turns green when placed next to a better 
appearing sample. Ages very rapidly. 
Fresh variety has great magnetic at- 
traction. (Note: Highly explosive and 
likely to be dangerous in inexperienced 
hiimh.)— Pat hjinder. 

ss 

"Directly you begin to think, you begin 
to speculate, and then you wonder, and 
afterwards you doubt, and finally it is as 
though a cloud has drifted across the 
sun." Far too many omit the first three 
steps but start with the fourth and be- 
come completely obscured in the fifth. 

ss 

The reason for the sex appeal of red- 
heatls is explained by the fact that red 
hair can stand more heat than blond, 
black or brown hair. 

• s* 

Irony! Several prisoners at Sing-Sing 
who are members of the Book-of-t he- 
Month Club received last month copies 
of "Twenty Thousand Years in Sing- 
Sing." Also at Sing-Sing, John L-A-W 
is football coach of the prison team. 

ss 

A sophomore (species conmion) was 
arrested recently in a neighboring town 
on the grounds of being a "suspicious 
looking" character. This "character" 
together with the vehicle in which he 
rode, a type of locomotion described as 
collegiate, could have been taken into 
custofly as a "dangerous" character. 

- — ■ — ss 

Do not flunk a course now for it will 
be twite as hard to pass next year with 
the semester plan, and nothing can he 
done about it. 

— — ss 

Have you seen Moe White's newest tie, 
the other one? Moe left for Storrs, Conn, 
without one. so a collection was taken 
among the members of the football squad, 
the bus was stopped at Palmer and Mel 
bought this imiKjrtant article of male 
attire at the local 5 and 10 emporium. 

ss 

The State football squad filled in the 
time previous to the start of the M.S.C.- 
C.S.C. game by watching a field hockey 
game between the Connecticut girls and 
a team from Posen-Nisson. In spite of 
the fact that the P.S. girls wore maroon 
our boys were impartial in their cheering 
and yelled for both teams. They gave 
especial encouragement to a "Gloria" 
from the Boston school and "Dinah" 
who wore the blue and white of C.S.C. 
The State football men got a few pointers 
in the gentle art of socking an opponent 
in a vulnerable spot by watching the 
girls rattle their war clubs on each other's 
shins. 

ss 

Overheard at a sophomore riding class. 
"Captain, my horse kicks! 1 will not 
go near the beast!" 

Do you blame the horse? 

SS' — ■ — 

No matter how drunk, pie-eyed, half- 
shot, pickled, oiled, plastered, intoxicated, 
boiled, inebriated, light, tanked, lit, potted, 
cock-eyed, gassed, under-the-weather , 
bleary, flooded, stewed, polluted, stiff, 
hinged, stinko, soused, blind or paralyzed 
a fellow may be, according to him the 
next morning he was only feeling good. 

■ ss 

Dr. Serex: "Do your next experiment 



Completed enrollment figures for Stock- 
bridge are as follows: 

Registration 1932 





Men 


Women 


Total 


Seniors 


110 


5 


115 


Freshmen 


119 


5 


124 


Specials 


3 


1 


4 



232 



n 



24.3 



Registration 1931 



Seniors 


108 




5 


ii:j 


Freshmen 


152 




7 


159 


Specials 


2 






2 




2G2 




12 


274 


Students coming from 


states 


other 


than Massachusetts are 


distribu 


ted as 


follows: 












Se 


niors Freshmen 


Maine 




1 




2 


New Hampshire 








1 


\'ermont 








2 


Rhode Island 








3 


Connecticut 




6 






New York 




3 




2 


New Jersey 




2 




2 


Michigan 




1 






Pennsylvania 




2 






Illinois 




1 




1 


Ohio 








1 



It seems that the fraternities are g- in;; 
to develop the inner man as well as the 
social. Kapi)a Fi)silon is following the 
lead of y.T.W and Alpha Sig by renio.',,!. 
ing one of the rooms for serving mea! to 
members. 



Incidentally, Phinney has been tun ing 
plumber in the kitchen, thereby adhering 
to his belief that only the ditch digger 
is happy. 



Kappa Sigma house is complaining 
because its new mascot gets more atcen- 
tion from the Abbey than the inmates. 



What Theta Chian wears a tie that is 
so coy that whereas it was white before 
a trip to the Abbey, it blushed a deep 
and permanent red when it returned? 



The average entering age of all fresh- 
men students in the two-year course is 
19.42 years. 

Place of birth of parents of the fresh- 
man class indicates a wide range of 
countries represented, including — 

Italy o, Holland 1, Poland 2, France 1. 
Brazil 1, Sweden 2, Portugal 1, Russia 1, 
Finland 4, England 3, Canada 3, Cape 
Verde Islands 1, Irkutsk, Siberia 1, 
Ciermany 1, Prince Edward Island 3, 
Nova Scotia fi, Ireland 4, 5k-otland 3. 

Sixty-three per cent of the class have 
parents born in the United States. 



Speaking of ties, an answer has htin 
found to one of the questions last wiik 
in State Static by the Kappa Sigma boys. 
Two or more girls may enter a fraternity 
house during an evening, provided they 
are selling neckties. 



Delta Phi Alpha has discovered in the 
jungle of its backyard two magnificent 
api)le trees just loatled with o-oh such 
be-eautiful apples! With the aid of a 
few barrels, the boys intend to conduct 
an experiment to determine whether 
Bacchus lends his presence as gladly to 
the fruit of the tree as to that of the vine. 



Free courses in engineering, history, economics, government, law and other sub- 
jects are being offered by Lafayette College to unemployed men over 30 years of 
age. That should be very much worth-while in the long run, but when one is un- 
employed, it is usually the short run that counts most. 



ENGINEERS POSSESS 

STRONG FAST ATTACK 
(Continued from Page 3) 

Coast Guard (1-0. Worcester Tech is the 
only college on the Massachusetts State's 
schedule that allows freshmen to play 
varsity sports. One of the outstanding 
backs on the Engineers eleven is Drago, 
a freshman, who scored Tech's winning 
touchdown against Trinity, by racing .32 
yards for a score in the first minute of 
the game. Coach Bigler has some ex- 
cellent ball carriers in Noreika, Drago, 
and Sfxlano. and a finely balanced line, 
hea<led by Captain Maggiacomo at 
center, Spence and Peterson. 

Worcester Tech in its first game of the 
season with Coast tiuard lacked a suc- 
cessful offence but presented a strong 
defence. However, in the game with 
Trinity, the Engineers' backfield did 
some excellent ball-carrying. In its con- 
test with Norwich last .Saturday, the 
Tech offensive machine clicked well and 
the Engineers scored 15 points. Gould, 
the Tech right halfback, scored both 
touchdowns against Norwich. Although 
Worcester displayed a superior running 
attack in the Norwich game, its forward 
pass defense was very weak, the Norwich 
cadets completing successfuly 21 passes 

Coach Mel Taube has been drilling his 
charges on a forward pass offense this 
week and is relying on the passing of 
Sheff, Bush, and White to penetrate the 
Engineers' defense. 

The probable line-up: 



The sororities have started the se.ison 

with a big send-off. Sigma Beta Chi, 

Lambda Delta Mu, and Phi Zeta have 
already given dances. 



Alpha Gamma Rho is going in big for 
classical music. They have acquired a 
large supply of high class records. With 
six members in the band, it is no wonder 
that the house has become do-re-me 
conscious. 



Ted Cook, Alpha Sig's demon student. 
broke a many years' record by stepi>ir,s 
out to the Gables last Thursday. 



Red Kelleher challenged all other Sig 
Ei)s to a slipiier fitting contest at 1 a.m. 
.\fter a two and a half hour stru.^gie, 
the last opjMJnent had given up. 



Theta Chi held a vie party that was 
well atten<led by representatives of all 
the houses on the row. The chaperoncs 
were Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Roberts and 
Mr. and Mrs. Newell Clark. 



Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi Sigma Kappa. 
and .Alpha Gamma Rho also openetl their 
houses for a night's entertainment over 
the week-end. 



The Qutes are complaining because, 
although Kovaleski would pass a public 
speaking course while asleep, he restrains 
his heart-throbs to Lithuanian. 



Bomb throwers please note: 90 Pleas- 
ant Street is not the Italian Embassy. 



Mass. State 

Mountain, le 
Guzowski, It 
Leaviit, Ig 
Leary. c (Capt.) 
Bickforcl. rg 
Cumniings. rt 
Smith, re 
Bigelow. qb 
Shefl. Ihb 
Bush, rhb 
Frigard. fb 



Worcester Tech 

re. McNulty 

rt. Lawton 

rg. Spence 

(Capt.) c, Maggiacomo 

Ig, Peterson 

It. IIodgkin!<on 

le, Molloy 

qb. Sodano 

rhb. Gould 

Ihb. Drago 

fb, Xoreika 



under the hood." 

'35: "How do you crawl under it?" 
ss 

An apple a day brings in the nickels. 
Whoever is selling those tempting apples 
in front of Stockbridge Hall is surer of 
his apples being safe than is the keeper 
of the orchards! 



OUTING CLUB 

The Outing Club will go to Mt. Nor- 
wottock in the east Holyoke range on 
Sunday, October 23. There will be some 
cliff climbing and a visit to Shay's Horse 
Caves. Busses will leave the East Ex- 
periment Station at 2 p.m. Sign up at 
the Library. 



PHILHARMONIC CONCERT 

The Philharmonic concert to be given 
over the radio Sunday afternoon at three 
o'cIcKk in the Memorial Building will 
include: Mozart's early symphony in C. 
(iabriel Pierne's arrangement of Cesar 
Franck's Prelude, Choral and Fugue, 
and Siegfried's Rhine Journey from 
Wagner's "Gotterdammerung." 



ORCHESTRA PLANS 

INDICATE BUSY YE.\R 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

phony and Percy Grainger's In A Cdtnl'}' 
darden, are among the old favorites. 

All players interested in joining the 
orchestra are invited to do so. A>; yf' 
no elimination policy has been put m 
practice, and openings for aspiring in- 
strumentalists are still waiting to b« 
filled. Rehearsals are held every V\ed- 
nesflay evening at 8.00. The members: 

Class of '3.3— Charles Moody 

Class of ';J4— Roger Bates. Grant Dur.iiam. 
Ralph Henrj-. Frank Batstone. William Lister. 
Benjamin Weinberger. Charles Coombs. 

Class of '.3.')— .^my Deardon, She don Blis*. 
George Hartwell, Philip Clark. Myer W iner, 
John V'eerling. Leonard Parker. Mar>- Lou Allen- 
Chester Cross. 

Class of 'afr— Louise Gavone, Elizabeth r.'-iclier. 
Priscilla King. EI zabeth Low. Dorothy .^unni. 
Charles SanClementi. Edmund Sullivan, /'mean 
MacMaster, Howard Parker. Allan Ka'/iman. 
Herbert Ferguson. Earle Chase. Norbin I -f'<'"* 
stein, Allan Fisher. William Chilson. K:!in« 
Farrell. Myler Boylon, Karl Macek, Ham Pratt- 



THREE HUNDRED STUDENTS 

CELEBRATE MOUNTAIN DA^ 
(Continued from Pafte 1 ) 

ing the contest "Dean" Burns wa^ ■ "^ 
upon for his usual speech. 

The afternoon was spent in hiku' , o^"*' 
the mountain, and seeing the cavf - an 
the various trails. Some returned ■ ^" b" 
while many hiked back. 



♦ 



SPORTS 



•«• 



•*• 



Harriers Win Over Tufts 
Booters To Meet Clark 



BOB MURRAY AGAIN 
CUTS COURSE RECORD 



I . - men of the Mass. State team were 
anions the first six to finish in the cross- 
louiitry race with Tufts last Saturday, 
i;i\iiin the Maroon and White harriers a 
l7.:;s win to start the season right. Bob 
Murray, the former Holyoke track star, 
anaiii broke the home course record, this 
tinif I utting it down to 21m. 4t)s. for the 
four mile course. 

Murray, in his record-breaking run, 
turnKJ in the outstanding performance 
ol the afternoon, finishing well ahead of 
the |>.uk. Captain Dave Caird and Red 
(riwiord tied for second, neither of them 
tn-ini; pushed by a Jumbo runner. How- 
i-vir, in the fight for fourth place Crosby 
lost out to Bowin of Tufts, the only 
vi>it(ir to interrupt the order of State's 
hrst five men. Little finished in sixth 
pLue, while Snow and Allen came in 
11th .md 12th respectively. 

Tlu- summary: 

Won by Murray, State; Crawford and Caird. 
i^ule. tied for second; Bowin, Tufts, fourth: 
Croshy. State, fifth; Little. State, sixth; Thomi)- 
Mn. Tufts, seventh; Laurence, Tufts, eighth; 
(.iry. Tufts, ninth; Savage. Tufts, 10th; Snow, 
State. 11th; Allen. State. l?th; Roberts. Tufts. 
13tli; Wortman, Tufts, 14th. Time — 21m. -lOs. 



SECOND GAME of SEASON 
PLAYED HERE TODAY 



IMKRFRATERNITY 








SPORTS RESULTS 


Points for 


T.F'thall 


Swim. 


.Soccer Total 


P.S.K. 


3f) 


2-4 


3(i m 


K.S. 


33 


24 


3(J 93 


s.i'.i:. 


.33 


20 


3() 8!» 


I.CA. 


33 


24 


30 87 


.VC.K. 


3.3 


20 


30 83 


A.S.I'. 


30 


20 


30 80 



Results for week of October 10 

Sttiiniiiiiig 
K.i|i|>a Sigma defeated Alpha Gamma 
Rho: 
200-yard relay 2:0<» l-5s. 

l.'iO-yard medley 2:03 l-.5s. 

l..»nili(la Chi Alpha defeated Sigma Phi 
Kp-iilon: 
2(H»-yard relay 
l.')0-yard medley 
I'hi Sigma Kappa 
SJKnia Phi: 
2l)0-yard relay 
l-")0-yard medley 
Ti)U(h K(M>tball: 
.Al|)h;i Gamma Rho tied Kappa Sigma 

(M) 
l-anilxja Chi Alpha tietl Sigma Phi 

l-psilon, 0-0 
I'lii Sigma Kappa defeated Alpha 
Sigma Phi, 7-0 
Soccer: 
Sigma Phi Epsilon defeated Lambda 

(hi .Mpha, 4-0 
l^il'ii'i Sigma defeated Alpha Gamma 



2:08 3-5s. 

2:05 3-")s. 

defeated .\lpha 

2:11 2-5s. 
2:01 4-r»s. 



Soccer will open its second game of 
the season with Clark University, here, 
at 3.15 today. While Clark promises a 
stronger offensive team than it had last 
year. State should score another \ictory 
on finer jjoints of play, and better con- 
dition. 

The Scarlet team has played two games 
this season the results of which are one 
win and one loss. The University boys 
won over a weak Tufts team with .i 
score of 2-0, and they were in turn de- 
feated by Brown 4-0. Brigg's Bcnners 
have played only one game this fall, and 
it was a decisi\e victory over W.P.I. 

The best that the Scarlet booters have 
to offer in defensive |>layers are their 
fullbacks, Hemenway and W'esterholiu. 
However, State's veteran forwards should 
make the (Geographers feel sick. The 
Maroon and White team, on the otlu-r 
hand, siiould have ample defense among 
its l)acks, to easily check a poor passing 
Clark fi)rwar«l line. The weakness on the 
State side of the fiehl will lie in the 
absence of Cajrtain Bob Taft, who may 
not be back from a trip in time to play. 

The jKobable line-up: 

M.S.C. 

Iltiuian. Dobbie. g 
('(iwing, rfb 
llodsdon. Ifb 



Blackburn. Ihb 
Pruyne, chb 
Tulliot. L.un(Uman, rhb 
Bernstein, olf 
Kozlowski. ilf 
Jackson, cf 
Taft, irf 
Mackiiiimic, orf 



Clark 

K. l-"orri-st 

Ifb. ilc-nu-Mway 

rfb, Wcsti-rliolm 

Ihb. Cutler 

chb. Benson 

rhb. Zarrow 

olf. Brierly 

ilf. Ivy 

cf, Raab 

irf. Anisli 

orf, Shappy 



.\CADEMIC ACTIVITIES 

FINANCI.M. REPORT 
(Continued from Page I) 

Subscription to The Collegian 
Subscription to The Index 
Support of general fund, which 
provides for <lebating, all 
coaching, prizes, medals, ad- 
ministration 1.50 



$2.(N) 
3.(K( 



Total $<i 50 

This tax also provides a general ad- 
mission ($..50) to any ;\cademics musical 
or dramatic programs upon the campus. 
There is also a $.50 tax for the support 
of agricultural judging teams which is 
nominally included in the Acadimics tax 
for convenience in collection and bcK)k- 
keeping, but which has nothing to do 
with Academic .Arti\ ities as such. 



Rho, 4-1 
Phi Sigma Kappa won from Alpha 
Sigma Phi, 4-1. 



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accurately replaced 
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reliable makes 

» HI-fcASANT STREET, (up one fliftht) 



IDA M. BRIDGEMAN 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main .St. Tel. 67- J Amherst. Mass. 



DICTIONARIES 

All Languages 

French - German - Spanish - Italian - Latin - Greek 

$1.00 and up 

WEBSTER'S COLLEGLATE DICTIONARY 
Best English Dictionary — ,S3.50 reduced from S5.00 

JAMES A,lmELL, Bookseller 



oirrsTANDiN(; sporis evknt 

Bob Murray leads State harriers 
home to a 17-3S victory over Tufts, 
as he cuts the course record to L'lm. 

4f,s. 



SPORTS CALENDAR 



Thuriuluy, October 30 

N'arsity Soccer, Clark at Mass. State 
Interfratornity SiM>rts: .-Mpha Siunia I'lii 
vs. Lambda Chi .Alpha 
Friday. Octol>er 21 

liui-rfrali-inily Si><>rts: 0T.\'. vs. IX'lta 
I'hi Alpha 
Saturtluy, October ii 

N'arsity Cross-Country: Worcester Tech at 
Mass. State 
Tueuluy, Oc(ol>er 25 
Interfraternity Si>ort8 
vs. Theta Chi; 
Dell;. I'hi Alpha 
Wednenduy, Ocloiier 2b 

Interfr.iternity Sjiorts: Sigma Phi Epsilon 
vs. I'hi SiKUia Kappa 
Thursday, October 27 

Interfraternity Sijorts: Alpha (jainiaa Rho 

vs. Q.T.V. 
Varsity Socit-r: Amherst at Mass. State 



Alpha Siitma I'hi 
ICappa Sigma vs. 



|; ^bru the Knot Dole ^ 



r)t)vie Bush is again leading the scorers 
in the eastern colleges with f'ltl points. 
The State speedster has scored 11 touch- 
downs in four g:imes. Montgomery of 
C«)luml)ia is sectjiid with .">!' points. Bill 
Frigard is 5l8t, with 19 points. 

Some scores of interest to State fol- 
lowers: 

.■\inherst 1.3, Hamilton 
C.C.N. Y. 13, Renssel.ierO 
Middlebury 18, Williams 7 
Tufts 0, Bowdoin 
Wagner 32, Coo|)er I'nion 
Worcester Tech 15, .Norwich •» 



Charlie Minarik. the iM>piilar Massii- 
chusetts State College fo<Jtball manager, 
received a free bath at the Connecticut 
State game last Satur<lay. Two Conne< - 
ticut State Waterboys were racing ai ross 
the field antl crashe<l into Manager 
Charlie, knocking him to the ground and 
dosing him with a liberal 8Ui)ply of water. 

At Amherst last Saturday, the \nU- 
cross-country team def<ate<l the Lord 
Jefl harriers 5.')- 15. The o<ldef.t f a< t was 
that the first fourteen nie.i broke the 
previous course reiord, with the Kli 
captain making the exceptional time of 
li»:39. 



Northeastern lost to Bates in cross- 
cfiuntry last Saturday at Eewiston, 20-31. 
Lamb was the first man to finish fcjr the 
Boston harriers, coming in fourth. 



At Springfield, Springfield College won 
the cross-country meet from Worcester 
Tech, 20 to 3(1. The best time was ma«le 
by (iibbs of Springfield who finished in 
2<',:4r,. 



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Capacious and Strong 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



State Beats Connecticut 
Plays Worcester Tech Next 



BUSH AND FRIGARD 
LEAD STRONG ATTACK 



The .Mas8<u'husetts State College foot 
ball te.im oxerpowt-red a heavy but in 
experienced Connecticut State College 
eleven, on (i.irdner Dow Field at Stt>rrs 
last S.iturd.iy, -'{'.1-0. The contest w.isthe 
first game following a six year breach of 
football relations between the two state 
colleges and although Connecticut was 
oiitplayeil in every department of the 
game, it olTered stubborn opposijon to 
the Mar«xm and White eleven, especially 
in the last period, when Massjichusetts 
St.ite f.iiled to score. With an olfeiise 
that functionetl excellently. Coach Mel 
Taube's charges made Hi first downs lo 
!) for Connecticut .State. 

Harly in the opening ix-ritHl, the Maroon 
.md White ele\tn received the b.dl on 
the twenty yard line and marched down 
to the Connecticut goal line, where Bill 
l-rigard plunged over ft)r the first score. 
In the sec<jiul ]>orio<l, .ShefT hurled a 
beautiful 40-yard pass to Bush, who 
raced ten yards for the setoiul touchdown. 
Near the ch)se of the second <|uarter. 
State score<l its third toiuhdown after a 
steady drive had placed the ball near the 
Conne<(icut goal, Slu-fT hurled a !»-yar«l 
pass to Bush for the score. 

In the third quarter, after a steady 
drive down the field by .Massachusetts 
State had placed the b.dl near t hi' oppo- 
nent's goal line, Bush sliced through 
tackle for his third touchdown. In the 
same period, Kriganl intercepted a Con 
necticut pass and raceil (10 yards for the 
sixth State touchdown. ShefT success- 
fully converted three of his six attempts 
for the extra point. 

Kor the first time this year, the Marmin 
and White ehven displaye<l a high- 
sroring, powerful, olTensive attack and 
the Connecti'Ut line played Irxtsely and 
broke before the determined .Ma.ss^ichu 
setts .St.ite attack. In the State backfield. 
Bush le<l the scorers with four t(iu< h 
downs. Frigard following with two 
touchdowns. ,\lt hough he did not store 
any totichrlowns, J«m- SIkII did tlu- |(«-sl 
ball-carrying for Massiichusetts and bore 
the brum of (he atlaik in (lie lon^^ 
man hes down the field for tou(h<!owns. 
Cai)t.iin Dan Leary. Siiiith and Leavitt 
featured in the Mas.s.-ichusetts line. 

The line-up: 

Mum. .Slate Conn. State 
.Mountain, le re. Stevens 

fiuzowski. .Sicvers, CumniinK, It rt. riene 

Butke, L.<avitt. Ik rg, Horn 

l.«-ary. Griswold. c r. Wilkinson 

Sibson. Nietipski, Bickford, m Is, Vesukiewitz 



ENGINEERS POSSESS 
STRONG FAST ATTACK 



.\ strong Worcester Tech f(M>tball team 
will meet Co.u h Mel Taube's Mass.u hu- 
setts .State College eleven on Alumni 
I'ielil, ()ct»)ber 22. The Engineers have 
their strongest combine in years and 
Massiichuselts State is prepared for a 
stiff struggle. Last year State defeated 
Worcester Tech .3-0. 

Worcester Tech has won two games 
and tied one this season, defeating 
Trinity 7-0, antl Norwich 15-0, and tying 
(Ck>nllnued on Pafte 2, Column 4) 



MASSACIIlISK'r 
BALL 

Player 
Bickford, U. II. 
Cummiiigs, B. V. 
Leary, I). J. (Capt. 
Sheff. J. J. 
White, M. F. 
Bigelow, (i. 11. 
Burke, K. F. 
Bush, L. J. 
Cobiirn, J. L. 
Cuihr, K. T. 
Frigard, W. 
C.riswohl, N. B. 
I.ojko, J. 

McCiuckian, A. T. 
Mountain, I ). C 
MuIImII, K. 
Ryan. A. S. 
Seperski, S. F. 
Sibson, J. A. 
.Sievers, 11. K. 
Smith, K. 
Consolatti, J. 
Ciiniming, K. 
DiMarzio, K. 
(.ilhlle, W. 
(.rillm, J. 
< iuzowski, W. 
Ja< kimcz>k, Z. 
I.an<lis. A. B. 
Leavitt, K. 
M( Ktlligott, J. 
M.iran, |. F. 
Nietiipski, I'. 
Kamstlell, A. 
Savaria, T. 
Tikofski. A. 
Wihry, B j 
W<M.d, J. L. 



CumniinKs. rt 
Sniitli. Kyan. re 
Ijtjkt,. liiKelow. i|li 
Itiisli. CiinHiilatti. rhb 
SiK-ff. Whit.-, Ihb 
l-riKard. ( oburii. fb 



IS srAii< 


. FOOT- 


SQUAD, 


FALL 


1432 


/'. 


117. 


.v<.. 


Class 


g 


It 15 


44 


1033 


t 


200 


41 


103.3 


)c 


H15 


25 


1033 


hi) 


10« 


3K 


1033 


hb 


155 


30 


1033 


.,b 


ir>.s 


10 


19.'i4 


a 


103 




1934 


hi) 


145 


40 


1934 


fb 


170 


40 


1934 


K 


140 


20 


1934 


fb 


105 


24 


1934 


c 


172 


27 


1934 


.,b 


147 


51 


19.34 


e 


142 


31 


1934 


e 


K'lO 


12 


1934 


t 


1X2 




1934 


e 


157 


14 


19.34 


c 


147 


34 


1934 


g 


107 


17 


1934 


t 


lK-1 


2.3 


19:i4 


e 


170 




19.34 


hb 


130 


40 


1935 


t 


IKK 


10 


1935 


t 


207 


l.< 


1935 


g 


10.-{ 


45 


1935 


e 


144 


42 


1935 


t 


I'M) 


11 


1935 


e 


I.'Ki 


47 


19;i5 


fb 


147 


15 


1935 


V. 


172 


.■{•• 


19;{5 


hb 


HO 


."Ml 


19.35 


V. 


l.'.K 


21 


19.35 


g 


1(„S 


4:{ 


1935 


K 


1.^7 


.•(2 


1935 


hb 


142 


2K 


1935 


e 


14K 


20 


1935 


e 


1 r,:i 


.33 


1935 


.,b 


I2K 


.iO 


1935 






It. Lrvitow 






If. 


K<l(ly 






r|l>. I 


"r«-nrh 




rhb, toss. 


Kelly 






Ihb. Warren 






fb. ( 


ronln 



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NUNN-BUSH SHOES 

Don't make the mistake of buying cheap shoes now that really fine shrjes are so 
low in price. Priced at $5.00— S7.00— $0.00 



E. M. SWITZER JR., Inc. 




( 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1932 



BURBERRY COATS 

Warmth WitJwut Weight 



These imported Coats are diflferent from domestic garments-always retain their same appearance, 

whether old or new. Consult "TOM" 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



l»OM IICAL I.EA(;UE FORMED 

TO INCLUDE THREE PARIIES 

(Continued from Paite li 

religion at Smith College and Socialist 
candiilate for representative from this 
district, has been invited to present the 
platform of his party. I'rofessor Harlow 
has addressed student groups on this 
campus several times in the past under 
the auspices of the Christi.m .\sso( iation 
and the liberal Club. 

William Semanie, Socialist member of 
the I^xecutive Committc-e of the League, 
exi)resse<l the opinion that if the League 
should decide to disband at the close of 
the presidential campaign, the Socialist 
section would continue to operate as a 
Socialist Club. 

Samuel Ciilmore, leader of the Republi- 
can section of the League, stated tiuit he 
was confident that Hoover would carry 
this campus in the straw vote to be con- 
ducted by the Colle^i<in at the close of 
the campaign. 

The non-partizan Political League was 
formed as a result of the action of the 
group of stmlents which heard an address 
two weeks ago by Alfred Baker Lewis' 
Socialist candidate for Governor of 
Massachusetts. 



though the admission tax of ten cents 
will be charged. .Students are urged to 
write home with the end in view cjf in- 
viting all l)a<ls for their own guest day. 
The members of the committee urge co- 
operation on the part of each and every 
student, as the affair is under the com- 
plete student supervision. Success oi 
Dad's Day depends in good measure on 
the willingness of all to remain on campus 
on the week-end of November .'>, in order 
to furnish the visitors with superlative 
guide service. The program: 
S.30. 2.00 p.m. Registration in the M Building 
<>,(H»;10,(K)a.tn. Inspection of Departments 
10.30-11.00 a.m. Exhibition, Military Uept. 
U. 00-12.30 p.m. Reception to Dads by Faculty 

in M Building 
12.4.1- l.lo p.m. Luncheon, Draper Hall 
2.00 p.m. R.IM. V9. M.S.C. Football 

Freshman-Sophomore Rope 
Pull (six-man) between the 
halves 
6..30- 7.40 p.m. Dad's Day Supper. Draper Hall 

Speaker, Dean Machmer 
7.45 p.m. Entertainment by Fraternities 

and Sororities 



ATHLETIC BOARD ACTS 

ON FREE ADMISSIONS 
(Contlnuad from Paft* 1) 

visiting teams, to which this college pays 
a guarantee which usually exceeds the 
gate receii)ts, from twenty to thirty or 
more free admissions. Discontinuing this 
policy imi)lies reciimxal at:tion by other 
colleges. Nor dcK-s it seem fair to the 
student body, which supports the games 
by means of the student tax, explained 
Professor Hic-ks, to continue to issue large 
numbers of complimentary tickets to 
players for home games when many of 
these are used by alumni and others who 
would cnherwise help to support athletics 
by paying the admission fee. Passes will 
still be available to coaches of visiting 
teams, their wives, and to scouts from 
other colleges. 



DAD'S DAY PROGRAM 

N EARING COMPLETION 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 
Hugh P. Baker, newly appointed Presi- 
dent of the college, may be in attendance 
on Dad's Day as guest of honor. Dr. 
Baker recently notified college authorities 
of his intention to visit the campus some 
time during November, and those in 
charge are in hopes that lead's Day, 
which is scheduled for November 5, will 
be a convenient date for the new Presi- 
dent to visit in his official capacity for 
the first time. 

Chairman Caragianis is of the opinion 
that Dad's Day. thniugh the practical 
program which has been arranged, will be 
not only a day of entertainment, but an 
opportunity for the fathers of students to 
see the value of campus life in its ma- 
terial aspect. Through student enter- 
tainment visitors may see the "students 
at play"; through the game and rope- 
pull, the afterncKm events, the Dads may 
observe the well-drille<l teamwork of the 
Physical Education department. College 
ecpiipment will be cm view in all <lepart- 
ments, and the visitors may gain a 
general view-point of all phases of 
collegiate life. 

Complimentary tickets for the Uennse- 
laer Polytech game in the afternoon will 
be given to all Dads who register, al- 



FOUR CONCERTS PLANNED 

BY LOCAL ASSOCIATION 
(Continued from P«ftc 1) 

for the Amherst series. There is no doubt 
but that he ranks with the greatest 
violinists of the present day. 

Leo, Jan, and Mischel Cherniavsky, 
playing the violin, piano, and 'cello in 
trios and solos, will appear here during 
February. They have been playing to- 
gether on the Euroi>ean and -American 
concert stage for thirty years and during 
that time have maintained themselves as 
favorite musical performers. 

Mr. Ferguson of the Community Con- 
cert .Association stated that critics con- 
sider Mr. Nelson Eddy, who will ai)pear 
either in March or in April at College 
Hall, as the best baritone on the American 
concert stage. Mr. Kildy is yet very 
young in comparison with cjther more 
matured and experienced artists, and he 
has not as yet accjuired a reputation. 

The officers of the asscx-iation wish to 
make it clear that these concerts have 
not as yet been definitely engaged. How- 
ever in the event that any one of tin- 
above mentioned artists will not be able 
to appear in Amherst, another ecjually 
noted will be substituted. 

Professor Waugh announced also that 
the amount of money collected for mem- 
bership was not as large as last year's 
total although the number of members is 
greater. This is explained by the fact 
that more students joined at the special 
price. 



SORORITY ATHLETICS 

Miss Janet Sargent '35 was elected 
athletic captain of Sigma Beta Chi 
Monday night. Miss Sargent has been 
prominent in athletics on this campus. 
Besides being a member of the Women's 
Athletic Association she has shown re- 
markable skill in horse-back riding and 
basketball. She played on the Newton 
High School varsity basketball team. 
She has also been a counsellor at Camp 
Lynnholm, where she was an instructor 
in horse-back riding, tennis, and swim- 
ming. 

Since there arc now several sororities 
on campus, it is expected that inter- 
sorority athletics will gain prominence 
this fall. The sororities are Sigma Beta 
Chi. Lambda Delta Mu. Alpha Lambda 
Mu. and Phi Zeta, and they are all look- 
ing forward to an interesting year from 
the athletic point of view. 



EXTENSION WORKERS TO 

MEET AT STATE COLLEGE 

Adjusting the extension program to 
meet present econouiic conditions is the 
purpose and theme of a state-wide con- 
ference of extension service workers, 
according to an announcement made 
recently by Willard A. Munson, state 
director. The conference will be held at 
the Massachusetts State College, Novem- 
ber 21 and 22. 

Last year the annual conference was 
not held, due to economic conditicms, but 
the advisory committee of the county 
managers, consisting of Joseph Putnam 
of C.reenfield, (ieorge Story of Worcester, 
and .Mlister McDougall of Concord, to- 
gether with Director Munson, decided 
at a recent meeting that state and 
country workers should convene this year 
to talk over the present situation and 
how best the county agents and state 
leaders can meet the situation. 

The program will start Monday at 
10..'i() and will close Tuesday afternoon 
so that county workers may return home 
on that day. Monday evening's program 
will be of a social nature. 



^^Qensation '' 

STEPS 

The sensational 

new Step-in by 

Ncnio-Klex, molds 
to the figure and 

does not climb 

FISHER'S 



ALUMNI NOTE 

Wellington Kennedy '28 and "Arny" 
.Arnurius '29, who are landscape archi- 
tects with Cragholme Nurseries. (Jreen- 
wich. Connecticut, entered the big West- 
chester Flower Show at Rye, N. Y. this 
fall with a formal garden. The planting 
was i)rincipally broad leaved evergreens 
and boxwood with a spreading dogwood 
tree in the background overshadowing a 
bronze statuette by Harriet Frismuth, the 
famous garden sculptor. This combined 
artistic talent won the sweepstakes prize. 

Carlton G. Prince '32 is learning some- 
thing more about plant materials as an 
employee of the Scott Nurseries in 
Bloomfield, Connecticut. 



2.50 and 5.00 



M. S. C. MENS MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

"Let Dave do it" 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



Typing 
First Class Work Low Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi SIg" House 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



Everything in Hardware 






and Radio Equipment 



PHILCO^ 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



AMHERS 



Thurs.-Fri.. Oct. 20-21 
\'ote every* Schnozzle! 

** PHANTOM 
PRESIDENT" 

with 

GEORtiE M. COHAN 

Cl.AlDETTE COLBERT 

JIMMY DIRANTE 

Saturday, Oct. 22 

The All- American Half Wits 
WHEELER and WOOLSEY 

in 

'*HOLD EM JAIL" 

with ROSCO ATKS 
EDNA MAY OLIVER 

Mon.-Tues., October 24-2 5 

HAROLD LLOYD 
in 

"MOVIE CRAZY" 

Wednesday, Oct. 26 

SALLY EILKRS-BEX LYON 
in 

'HAT CHECK GIRL" 



In accord with an announcement last 
year that the university would accept 
produce from Illinois farmers as tuition 
and that they would pa>' ten iier cent 
above the market price, a student at 
Illinois Wesleyan University paid his 
tuition with 40 sacks of potatoes. 



Vou have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 



APPLES AF BOSTON COLLI .1 

If the old saying that "An a; ; !t a 
day keeps the doctor away" is true, 
students in Boston L'niversity's C ■ llt^j 
of Liberal .Arts should be the heal'hiest 
of folks, for in the five school niuiuhs 
since last February, nearly 1I,(KH) applfs 
have (lisiippeared into their respdiivt 
digestive systems in exchange for .^.".yi 
or 5 cents i)er apple. An apple-di-t; !,m. 
ing machine in the college book ^ture 
does it. It holds seventy-two appks. Is 
filled on an average three times i i t\vrj 
days, and sometimes it is as ofiin as 
twice in one day. 

The co-eds do not admit it, but pu^jil.lv 
vanity as well as a desire for good lu-altli 
is behind this apple consumi>tioii, (or I 
according to one health expert, the regu- 
lar eating of apples is a short cut to easy 
reducing, as they i)rovide a balanct^ 
food, giving vigor without corpuleiu e. 

"Six apples a day drives fat away," he 
says. "Eat six to ten apples every day 
for a week, and only these, and weight 
will be reduced without the slightest dis- 
comfort or loss in health." 

INTERCOLLEGIATES 

Thomas-for-President Clubs have hein 
formed in more than 123 colleges. Tht 
club at the Mniversity of Wisionsin 
organized a meeting for Thomas with 
t),(K)() in attendance. Johns lloi>kini 
students have completed a seven day 
campaign tour of Maryland. Minnesota 
students have combined Smialist cam- 
paign work with the picketing of a loral 
building trades strike. At Yale the dub 
has opened headtjuarters in the Imsiess 
part of New Haven. 

According to the Institute of Family 
Relations, the college campus is rapidly 
replacing the church societies as a p<>|)iilar 
mating-ground. One of every six iiiarri.i>;e> 
end in divorce; one in seventy-five sown 
in coWe^e crash. —Arizona Wildail 



Almost 45 per cent of the 878 freshmen 
who answered a questionnaire at llunitr 
College are under the normal (i>llt*.e 
entrance age. Of these five arc only U 
years old and eighty-four are 15. 

— AV-ii' York Try.fi 



Feels great to have your hair 
shampooed after a haircut I 



AMHtRST SHOE MPAIRIN6 CO. The College Barber Shof 

"Goodyear Welt System Kmpluyed" "M" BUILDING 



FAST COLOR BROADCLOTH SHIRTS 

Pre-Shrunk— White, Tan and Green 

$1.00 and $1.55 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - - MASS. 



Have you tried 
A SCOTCHMEN'S OMKLET 

Served only at 

BUCK DEADY'S? 



Full Line of Riding Habits, 

Boots, Breeches, Coats, and Sweaters for Ladies and Gentlenitn. 

All kinds of Sport Wear for Students at Special Prices. 

COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 



No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

RErAIRIXG AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASH1N(; DONE AT REASONABLE 1 RICES 

Uur Laundry First Class 

Our I'olicy Guaranled 

NEXT TO THK TOWN IIAl.l 



TYPEWRITERS 
or Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHlN 

''The finest eating place in Amherst'' 

SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 

INCORPORATKD 




\\. A. C. Library. 



OtrsTANDINt; EVENT 
OK THE WEEK 



CLoUeaian 



MiiHMUi'hiiitvIt* .Sliile d«- 
(culfti Worte.ler Tech In 
ihrf«> aiMtriii lu.l Mi-fk, 
(ooihull, ■oi'cvr und cnt.ii- 
i'iitiiiir>. 



VoL XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1932 



Number 5 



Political League to Hold 

Rally Friday Night 



Dr. Hanson, Henry Stimson, and 
Prof. Warne to Speak 



I'rominent representatives of the three 
major political parties will speak at a 
rally conducted by the Political League 
Friday night at 7..'U) in Memorial Hall. 
The Democratic Party will he repre- 
sented by Dr. J. G. Hanson of North- 
ampton, the Republican by A. Henry 
Stimson of Northampton, and the Social- 
ist by Professor Colstoi E. Warne of 
Amherst College. After short sjMjeches in 
suiiport of each party, the meeting will 
l)f thrown open to discussion and ques- 
tions from the floor. 

Dr. Hanson, a well-known physiciai 
in Northampton, has long been active in 
thf support of the Democratic Party, and 
is one of the Presidential Klectors. Mr. 
Stimson has had a wide political experi- 
ence and is prominent in local Republican 
circles. Professor Warne is a leader in 
the Socialist movement and has been 
active in the League for Industrial De- 
nuA-racy. He is Professor of Economics 
at .Xmherst College and has written a 
number of books and pamphlets on 
enmomic problems. 

K. S. Hosford '33, Chairman of the 
Political League, has planned the rally 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 1) 



Hood Dairy Scholarships 
Given to Three Students 



Bickford, Potter, and Andrews Re- 
ceive Awards 



Three sch(jlarships of *2()0 each, known 
.IS the H(mk1 Dairy Sholarships. offered 
Id men and women students at Massji- 
rhusetts State College, "whose aim is 
'htinitely set to pronuite firming as a 
lili- opjjort unity, particularly in the jiro- 
iluition of milk," have tieen awarded to 
Ralph II. Bickford ':!:5. Ilarohl C. Potter 
'o4 and Frederick N. .Andrews '.{."). These 
scholarships were made pos-ible through 
the nift of Dr. Charles H. Ho(mI. The 
II. P. Hood and Sons Dairy Company 
offers similar scholarships iii eat h of the 
other land grant colleges in New England. 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column I) 

Declamation Added to 
Fraternity Competition 

New Point Basis Also Adopted for 
Academics 



I lie .Academics sub-committee of the 
' ommittee upon Interfraternity Com- 
pitiiion has arranged the following pro- 
gram for the current year: a vaudeville 
<ontest upon Dads' Day, an interfra- 
fernitv sing, a declamation contest, each 
ho J. t„ enter two speakers, one de- 
claiming in verse and the other in prose, 
and a house inspection in the spring. 
Each of these contests will rate equally 
*'th the others in the determination of 
the imal award, and the four of them to- 
gether will con.stitute the basis for one- 
^f' '>f that award, the other two-thirds 
belonging to athletics and to scholarship 
re«p^<-tively. In each Academics contest 

ill be four placements, for which 

t^ic allowing credits will be awarded: 

' '-'. ><, and 4. Fraternities which make 

^ -^r litable entry but do not place 

amt.,.; the first four will be allowed one 

cred.T. £ach of these contests will be in 

'"■'^'' of a committee composed of 

f'urney '33, representing the 

^ernity Council, Professor Rand. 

'^'"g the Academics Board, and 
■ member, representing the field of 



a fi . 



^itv. 



INDEX NOTICE 

"■■' Juniors, and Sophomores who 
''' ' ' fill 
^ ^ nil out an Index questionnaire at 

'V ^ chapel exercise please fill out 

\\ f ^^^ College Library desk before 

• evening, October 31. 



COLLEGE COMMITTEE 
AIDS LOCAL JOBLESS 



Ab»ut Three Thousand Dollars 
Raised fur Help 



-About three thousand dollars were 
raised by the rnemployment Relief 
Committee of the College of which ICarle 
Carpenter, Secretary of the Extension 
Ser\ice, is chairman. One hundred and 
twenty-two dollars of the fund was ^<m- 
tributed by the students during the 
Christian .Association dri\e last year. 

Over UfjO work-days at three dollars a 
day were given to a large number of men 
from .Amherst, Pelham, and Sunderland. 
These men were employed only at the 
recommendation of the respective welfare 
departments of these towns. The work 
accomplished by these men and with the 
funds was the construction of the side- 
walk from the east end Ex|H'riment 
Station to the Bacteriology Building. 
The new score board on the fcjotball 
field was constructed and erected by these 
men. The drainage system on the south 
-Athletic Field and the straightening of 
the brook l)y the field are results of the 
work of the men hired by the Unemplo>'. 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 3) 

NEW GLEE CLUB SHOWS 
BRILLIANT PROMISE 

David CoKgriff 'M Takes Lead as 
Founder 

With the dawn of a new era on ( am|)us 
which seems to promise much in the way 
of active interest in things musical, comes 
the announcement of the formation of a 
men's glee club. The organiziition has 
been formed through the initiative of 
David CosgritT ".iA. who, as a regular 
meiiiber of the lolaiithe Chorus la.st year, 
felt the need of an organization for male 
voices, one which would concentrate 
\'o(al talent on program luiinliers of tin- 
popular standard ty|)e. Three rehears;il> 
have been held already tinder the baton 
of W. (irant Dunham "-iA. and the 
prosjjects for a glee club of excellent 
\oice material are attra( ting more interest 
with each meeting. Rej|uests inr two 
outside ap|)earances have already lieen 
accepted, both of which will result in 
I)resentati<ms some time next month at 
South Hadley and at the Psyi hiatric 
Hospital at Hartford, Conn. 

(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 2) 

Foreign Students to 

Visit State Campus 

Fourteen foreign countries will be 
represented in a grou)) of twenty-five 
students who come from the Inter- 
national Institute at Teacher's College, 
Columbia and who will remain on campus 
for a visit of two days, FViday, Octofier 
28, and Saturday, October 29. The 
group is under the super\ision of Doctor 
Lester M. Wilson of the International 
Institute and is now making a week's 
tour of a few of the Land Grant Colleges. 

Each member of the group is con- 
nected with some phase of education in 
his own country and each is a student at 
the Teacher's College in Columbia Uni- 
versity. Their course includes a week's 
trip of inspection and study of the Lantl 
Grant Colleges of the country. Their 
intinerary includes Massachusetts State 
College. While here they will devote their 
attention to the Extension work and to 
the Experiment Station, with a cursory 
study of the Physical Education system. 
They will also attend the Amherst- 
Mass. State football game. 

Among the countries represented in 
this group are: Labrador, Roumania, 
India, Chile, China, Persia. Brazil, 
Japan, Syria, and Scotland. 



NEW PICTURES 

ON EXHIBITION 

Works of Stephan L. Hamilton ex'31 
Being Shown 

P.iintiiigsancl drawings done li\- Stephen 
I.. Hamilton, former student at Massa- 
chusetts State College, are on exhibit ii>n 
this week in the Meniori.il Building. Tlu' 
work ilone \>y Mr. Hamilton is of interest 
to this campus not onl\ because his sub- 
jects are familiar to this part of the 
country, hut alst) because the only in- 
struction the artist h.is h.id was received 
at this college. 

Leaxing college in the spring of his 
junior jear beciiise of ill health, Mr. 
liainilton has spent abotil two Nears 
u|)on his painting. He h.is recfi\ed en- 
couragement from sexiral artists and 
critics and his work has won approval in 
many ways. ( )ne of his strong points is 
iIh- aciiiracy of his drawing, especially 
noticeable in his representations of trees. 
A convincing portrayal of the effect of 
light in the landscajK- is .dso of marked 
importance in main of the pittiires. 

Pencil, i)en, charcoal, pastels, ami 
water<-olors are the mediums with which 
Mr. Hamilton has dom- the most of his 
work up to the present time. Later he 
ex|)e<ts to work in oils although he be- 
lieves that pastels and watertoh»rs are 
the mediums with which one can work 
quickly enough to catch some of the 
efTe<ts he does. .Mr. Hamilton is now 
attending the <las8es of the .Amherst Art 
Club which, while there is no instruction, 
givi's him an opportunity for contact 
with others as well as suggestions and 
criticisms of value. 

New Salem, Mass., Stephen li.iinilton's 
home, has furnished him with iiiiii h of 
his subject matter. .Among thes«' pic- 
tures are the three of the New S;deni 
(Continued on Pafte 2, Column .t) 

SIDNEY SHEPHARD '33 
AWARDED SCHOLARSHIP 

Takes ST.SO Prize f«»r Individual 
Jud(;Linii at Detroit 

Sidney Sheph.irrI of the (las-, of l'.i;i;; 
was ;iw;ir(lfd a schol.irship \-,iliif<l ;il $7-')<i 
at the nationil < oiitest whi< h is spoiison-d 
by the .National Dairy and Ice Oeam 
Maniif.ai turing .iiid Sunpliis .AsstK-ialion 
held in Detroit, Midiigan, last week. 
He was a member of the Mass;uhus<'tts 
State College dairy judging team along 
with Charles MfMwly and Robert Taft. 

Eighteen teams competed in the na- 
tional contest and the College team 
placed sixth in the final results. Shepliard 
plactH tenth in imlividual judging and 
was awarded one of the six scholarships 
given because of the ineligibility of the 
other contestants who placed. He is to 
continue gradu.ite work in dairy manu- 
factures next year. Robert Taft [)laced 
sixth in the individual judging of milk 
and butter, while Shephard placed fourth 
in cream judging. 

Last year the Massachusetts team 
placed fourth and Azor (ioodwin '.'J2, 
one of the members of the team also 
won a sc:holarship. 



State Downs Worcester; 

Meets Amherst Next 

25-0 Win Over W. P. I. Indicates Strength 
Of Team To Meet Lord Jeffs Saturday 

LKADER OF M.\R()()N AND WIIITK 




(^ptain Dan Leary 



SABRINA ELEVEN HAS BUSH and SHEFF STAR 
A POWERFUL ATTACK for MAROON and WHITE 



The Massiic hus(-lts State Collegi- fcnit- 
liall le.im will meet its great rival, 
.Amherst College, in the traditional 
!>.-ittle un .Mumni Field, (); tc>l)er 2'.' 
Both eU\«'ns have enjoyed successful 
seasons. State defeating Cooper I'nion, 
.Midclleliury, Connecticut State, Wor 
< c-ster Tc-cli, and losing only to Bowcloin, 
while the Siibrina eleven iiiicIct the 
tutelage of Coach Lloyd Jordan for the 
first year, has defeatecl (dlliy, I'nion, 
il.imilton anci Wesh->an, and Ikl.s lost 
ody to Princetcjn. Amherst has scored 
■44 points to its opponents' 2K, and the 
(CcmtlniitHl on I'liite .}, (>>lunin i) ' 



The Maroon and White football ma- 
chine of .M.iss.i< husetts State ( cdlege 
functioned sincHtthly last Siiturday to 
cAcTwInlm a hard lighting Worce-.ter 
Tech el«-\en on .Alumni lielcl, 2f)-{). 
Dtnie Bush led the scoring attac k of the 
T'aubemen and his excellent brciken-field 
running was the feature of the- game. 
Last \«'ar the luigineers' eleven held the 
Massiiclnis<-tts State team to a ■'<-() 
\ictory for State, but last .S,itiird.iy the 
li.ird pliiiigiiig M.issac husetts backs rip- 
ped the- Worcester clefense to shrecjg, 
scoring lour loii«hdowii>> 

i<Uintiiiuvtl on I'ufte J, Column 2) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



// Ihou drfire U> Trap profit, read with 
humility and fa.thfulncis; nt/r nnrr desire 
the estimation of Irarninii. 

—Thomas a Kempis 
Imitation of Christ 



Thursday, October 27 

7 .'JO p "> ColU'Kian Compptitwn. 
Friday, October 2« ... I 

7..'10i)in. I'»liti<;il Rally, Memorial liall 
Saturday, Octohter 2f) 

2.f<) p.m. X'ar-iity Football, .Amherst at 
Alumni Field 

2..'W) p.m. C'rosB-rountry, Amtierrt. here 

House Dan(PS 
Sunday, October 30 

9.(X) a.m. ('hai)c;l, Profes.tor William Lyon 
Phelps 

2.00 p.m Outing Club Hilce to Mt. Toby 

3 (Kl p.m. Philharmonic Conrrrt. Memorial 
Hall 
Monday, October M 

X.OO p.m. Cilcc < hit) Rehearsal 
Tuesday, November I 

H.OO p.m. ( horiH. Memorial Hall 
Wednesday, November 2 

.'} 20 p.m. Assemtilv, Scholarship Day 

4.00 p.m. W.S.c, A Tea 
Thursday, November 3 

H ."JO p.m. Community Concert, College 
Hall. Tostha S(;idel 



POPULAR RESPONSE TO Professor Collier Will 

DAD'S DAY PROGRAM Speak at Next Assembly 

I 

Interesting and Amusing Day Beinf} .Scholarship Day Speaker (iomes 
Prepared for Parents from ilrown 

.Ac-cording tc» c-onimiltee-ch.iirman Cos-' Doc-tor Theoclore ('oilier. l'rofess<»r of 
tas Caragianis plans for an c)utstancliiig < ilistciry aiicl head of the clepartment at 
Dad's Day this year are meeting with Brown L-niversity, will .icldrcss the 
excellent c-o-cjperalion from all con- ' .Sc liohirship Day assembly on the sub- 
cerned. "I);id's Day (iromises to be a ' jc-cf, "'I he Why and flow of Kducation." 
most interesting .\cjvembc-r .")tli ancI the ' in Bc)wker .Auditorium nc-xt Wednesclay. 
clay will surely be a memoraNe one for j professor (oilier has travelled ex- 
the Dads," stated Caragianis. -Art irhs ' ,t.„„iv,.|y i„ ih,- I nitccl State-sand Lurope, 
relative tc> the event are appearing fre- 
(Continued on Pafte 4, C:«lumn I; 

Gay Evening Enjoyed by 



ancI cluring the past summer he stucliecl 

ami travelled in Soviet Russia. He has 

taught at ( cirnc-ll and W'illi.inis, and helcj 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 5; 



Students at Tech Informal Professor Phelps To 

Yes, a gofxl time was had by all " at Speak at Sunday Chapel 

the W'fjrcester Tech Infc>rmal Satyrd;iy — — 

night, ()ctol>er 24, given for the W.IM J William Lyon Phelps, Lampson Pro- 
students. .Although a large number of fessor of Knglish at Yale University, 
Tech men attencled, the M.S.C. student I will be the first speaker in the .Sunday 
supj)ort was not u[) to [)ar. Chapel services for the coming year 

Music was furnished by the Amherst beginning October .'JO. 

Serenaders, an orchestra which has I I'rofessor Phelfw has been a teacher at 

earned a favorable reputation on this Yale L'niversity for forty years, and 

campus at past scxial affairs. The hall cluring that time he has estal)lished a 

was decorated so as to suggest a fo<jtf)aII reputation as an able critic in Knglish 

field with goal posts and college banners, Literature. He has clone as much as any 

and was divided by yard markers at the man can to fntpularize literature. He is 

."iO-yard, 40-yard and other yard lines. said to be the only memf>er of the Yale 

With a score of 2r> to on everyone's faculty staff for whom the students will 

mind, the atmosphere was gay, and re- attend vcjiuntary chapel. He is a profuse 

mainerl •¥> until the final ncjte was played author having written innumerable tK>oks, 
by the Serenaders at 11.4.'>. j articles, and treatises u[)on .American and 

Coach and Mrs. Melvin Taube and ' Knglish literature. Among his writings 



Mr. and .Mrs. (ieorge Kmery were 
cha|>erones. In charge of the dance was 
the Informal Committee, including: 



arc: Essnyn on Modern Nwelist%, Human 
Suture and the liihle, and Human Nature 
j in thf (iospel. 

Walter Maclinn, chairman, N'eLson Heeler, I Professor Phelps spoke at Sunday 
Edward Harve\ , and Carleton Mas. chat>el on April 2(>, lO.'Jl and the subject 
Mackin. of his address at that time was "Courage." 



I 



i 



t 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 27. 1W2 



/-•¥ 



/Ilba00acbu6e 




Collegian 



Official newspai)fr of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



Bf)Akl) OF KDITORS 

W. Raymond Ward '33 

Hditiir-in-Ckitf 



STATE 

smnc 



Stocftbrtftge 






EUC.ENB GORALNICK "33 

Managing l.diUir 



Alfrbda L. Ordway "23 
Associat* Editor 



Editor 
33 



Campus 
Raymond Royal '34, 
Alfrkda L. Ordway 
Ruth D. Campbell '34 
Harriette M. Jackson '34 
Mary L. Allen '35 
David L. Arenberg 35 
Elizabeth K. Hakrinoton 



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Theodore M. Leary '35 
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AdvntisiHg Manager 

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BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

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Business Assistants 



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^ ^ ^ EDITORIALS «^ 4* * 

CHAPEL 

Imagine if you cnn. how a visiting rk-rgyman con<iucting the morning chapel 
service must feel when, after singing a hymn as a near-solo with organ accompani- 
ment reading a Scripture lesson, saying a prayer, and expressing with obvious sin- 
cerity the best that is in his heart, he is greeted by the student body with merely a 
half-hearte.l muffled dapping of the hands. Religion has in.leed come to a pretty 
pass when on the campus of the State College of such a Commonwealth as this, it 
^n command no more enthusiasm than that. Why. even the foothall team gets a 
cheer and a song once in awhile, and Dean Hums is good for /v<. cheers any time o 
the day or night. Sh<.uhl not a morning chapel sermon, then, be worth three cheers? 
Aye. three cheers and even more! Ah. how regrettable it is that it receives not one. 

no. not one! . , ,,. , , 

Something should be done about it, that is most evident. We would suggest 
that the Senate appoint a committee to take care of the matter, a Committee for the 
Perpetuation of Appropriate Applause in Morning Chapel. This committee should 
be Kiven full power to make necessary rules and to enforce them. Any violation of 
these rules should be punished by depriving the offender of the privilege of attending 
morning chapels henceforth and forevermore. 

With such a committee working efficiently, considerable enthusiasm could be 
aroused in morning chapels. A college song might be substituted for the hymn and 
sung with appropriate gusto. Following this there might be a reading from, say the 
book of Matthew, then a short cheer for Matthew, and the prayer, followed in turn 
by vigorous applause in the nature of hand clapping, with a few loud shouts of ap- 
proval spontaneously mixe.l in. .\fter the address, or sermon, the student body 
should be taught to respond with at least enough enthusiasm to show ordinary 
courtesy The Long Yell, or the Locomotive should be given, followed by yelling, 
stamping, whistling, and further cheering. The students could then march out to 
the tune of llaiU Uail the Cane,'s All Here, which should be adopted as the theme 
song for all morning chain-ls of a religious nature. We don't think this is too much 
to ask of any student bcnly. and we demand immediate artion on the matter. 

Pardon us while we wax siircastic in suggesting that, as an alternative to this 
plan the close of a morning chaixl address might be marked only with a few moments 
of silence in respect for the feelings of the speaker, or perhaps even for his subject. 
Anything else might be just a little bit vulgar. 



"To complete an education a man 
should spend four years in grammar 
school, one year in a university, and two 
years in a prison." 

ss 

POEM OF THE MONTH 
There once was a soph from Ware 

Who siiid he was only half there, 
When they asked him which half 

He siiid with a laugh. 
I don't know and I don't even care. 

- — ■ — ss— - — 
When a dog bites a man, that is not 
news, but when a man bites a dog that is 
news and also when people eat bees 
instead of honey, as the natives do in 
Malaysia. 

ss 

Now the other point of view as re- 
ported by another scientist (female). 
MAN ANALYZED 
Symbol: B.O. An im|)ortant member 
of sez-1-it-y. 

Occurrance: Can be found wherever 
ladies live. 

Physical properties: Colorless, various 
shapes and sizes, .\ppears small but 
usually feels big. Dull but jjrightens 
when polished. Surface of face seldom 
unprotected by covering of bristles. 
Shrinks when near a better "bo" and 
inflates when filled with pride. Remark- 
al)ly pliable, and can be easily moliled, 
with a little experience, by feminine 
hands. 

Chemical properties: Exceedingly ac- 
tive. Has a marked afhnity for green- 
backs, requiring woman's famed in- 
genuity in the process of separating them. 
.Absorbs ciuantities of food, Chesterfields 
and Lucky Strikes. Sours easily when 
neglected but is restorable, with proper 
treatment to original state. Subject to 
spontaneous combustion, and bursts into 
flame, forming— hot ak.— Pathfinder. 
ss 



The Stockbridge cross-country squad 
held their first trial runs last Wednesday. 
These looked encouraging. Harcjld Pear- 
son S';j;{ seems to be the star of the team 
this season. The times of the trials were 
as follows: 

Barenbaum 17:47, Chase 17.24. Han- 
son 17:04, Koistinen l<i:54, Pearson 14:4(). 
Roberts 20::i0, Towne 17:19, Rice KkIH. 
Yandow 20:31. 

The schedule includes: 

Nov. 3— Stockbridge vs. .\mherst 
College Freshmen 

Nov. 9 Stockbridge vs. Amherst 
Junior Varsity 

Nov. 17 Squad race. 

The next trial runs come Wednesday, 

October 27. 




Kolony Klub held its first "Prof. Nite" 
Sunday, October 23. Professor C.latfelter 
was the speaker. 

A house dance is to be held at the 
Kolony Klub, Saturday, October 29. It 
is expected that many of the alumni who 
return to see the Amherst-State game 
will take in the dance also. 

Philip Short S'32 was on campus last 
Sunday. Phil is now employed by the 
Armour Meat Packing Co. of Boston. 

Harold Engelmann S'29 and George 
Anderson S'29 called Sunday. They 
majored in Floriculture and Horticulture 
respectively, and are employed in a 
landscape nursery business at Pittsfield. 



A CORRECTION 

In a recent number of the Colli r.n 
occurred the statement that the sclu ; :lt 
hatl been arranged by semesters from in- 
very beginnings until 1910 when a ti mi 
system was adopted. The fact is iliat 
from the time of the entrance of the first 
class for many years the schedule a as 
arranged by terms, three to the year. In 
the early days there was a long vacation 
just after Thanksgiving, the idea 1( n^ 
that some of the students might find t m- 
ployment as teachers at that time. I do 
not know just when the semester \Am\ 
was adopted, but I have the impression 
that it was sometime during the Mi- 
ministration of President Butterfii Id. 
The long vacation in the winter was re- 
tained only for a short time. At the 
time when 1 was an undergraduate, 
from 1871 to 1875, the long vacation 
was in the summer, and that continued 
to be the arrangement until the semester 
plan was adopted. 

William Penn Brooks 



THE ANNUAL PESTILENCE 

No one loves the flv. In fact, no one even likes the fly. The fly is not merely a 
dirty little insect; he is dangerous as a carrier of disease germs of many sorts. He 
breeds and lives in nastiness and filth and carries it with him wherever he goe«s. Noth- 
ing is more revolting than to watch a fly trotting along on the surface of one's skin, 
picking up tastv little tidbits as he goes, and then leaving a juicy little vomit-spot 
as a sort of calling card just before he takes off for another destination. 

Not only is the flv filthv and dangerous, but he is a considerable nuisance in the 
classroom and laboratory. ' It is no small distraction to have flies crawling all over 
one's face, neck, and hands, an.l buz/.iag merrily in one's ears during a class lecture, 
a laboratorv exercise, or especi.dly during an examination. 

It is ratiur odd that a college which teaches courses in Entomology, Public Health, 
and Rural Sanitation should be troubled each fall with such a pestilence of flies. 
This year it seemed to be worse than ever before. We may be wrong, but we believe 
that the situation can and should be considerably improved. The mere fact that 
there is apparently no organized attempt at fly control here seems to justify that 

point of view. 

It is not our place to outline the various methods of fly control; there are others 
here who are much better qualified to do that. It is possible that some of the fly 
nuisance is unavoidable, but we would point out that at least unsanitary methods 
of handling and storing manure and dangerous toilet conditions might be remedied. 

This is not a pleasant subject for discussion, it is true, but it seems important 
enough to warrant its consideration and some action to improve the situation. If 
nothing can be done .ibout it, we should like to know why. 

SATURDAY'S GAME 

Evenly matched teams promise an interesting and exciting game Saturday. 
Coarh Me! Taubi '- men can be relied upon to show the crowd some excellent foot- 
b.ill, uli.tlu r tlu\ will or lose. The team will certainly do its part to make the day 
a ^iK.r-^. iMil t".tli tlic Mudcnl- atid tin- aliiniiii should be willing; \n d.. as much by 
sui.i...rtin^; not unlv tli.^ tr.it.i. but the institution of the Amherst (.ame. Keincmher 
that a riot will [.rnI)aM\ iiiakr tlir Amherst Came a thing of the past. 

Tiic pnlitiralr.illv IViday nii;lit siioiibl lu' interesting to both students and faculty. 
A Demuirat, a Repul^liran. ,i Socialist, .uul an audience all in one room are bound 
[., mate some excitement. It will be followed by an informal football rally on the 
Drill I'i.l 1. I.ct'- ;;ol 



McCill University.— Agriculture stu- 
dents, in connection with their class- 
work, were taken to the largest brewery 
in America to learn how to make beer. 
Not many cut this class! 
ss 

The cheering last Saturday was pitiful 
at times. . . Bush did bring the crowd to 
its feet several times, but a football 
game lasts sixty minutes. . . The cheer 
leaders should recognize the players by 
their numbers so that a cheer can be 
given an outgoing player immediately 
and not four or five plays later. . . About 
five percent of the cheering section knew 
the words of the "Victory March.". . . 
The rest hummed or rather mumbled. . . 
Evidently the bass horns were too heavy 
to carry so the band remained parked in 
the bleachers where no one could hear 
or see them. . . The only sign of interest 
evinced by the student body towards the 
W.P.I, game was the impromptu mass 
meeting held the night before on fra- 
ternity row. . . A mass meeting of about 
forty M.S.C. students. 

— ■ — ss 



The following students have accepted 
the A.T.G. bid: 

19.3:i— Paul J. Libbey, Chilton Hastings. 
James F. ( )'.\eil. J. Kenneth Van Leeuwen 
Dwight K. Williams. 

1934— Russell Wood. J. Luis Zuretti. 
Thomas F. Furze. Edward L. Uhlman, 
C.arland C Bell. Sherwood C. Kenyon, 
Franklin N. Prescott, Edward Machon. 
John W. Palmer. Lauren W. Hawes, 
Chester E. Goodfield. 

IMans are now under way for the 
annual initiation banquet to be held 
Wednesday evening November 2 at the 
Hotel Northampton. The committee in 
charge is being headed by Leland B. 
Livermore S'33. 

The following A.T.G. alumni have 
dropped in at the Club House during the 
past two weeks: Omer R. Descheneaux, 
Jr. S'32. Maurice Ryan S'32. Leo Toko 
S'.32. James Sullivan S'32, Timothy 
Rabbitt S'32, Howard Hulbert S'31. 



COMMUNICATION 

To the Editor: 

The Informal Committee is composed 
of three Seniors and one Junior ele(te<l 
by the Senate for the purpose of running 
dances to be enjoyed by all undergr.idu- 
ates, graduates, and employees of the 
college. 

The Committee gives its time and 
efforts gratis, with no intention of ha\ ing 
a surplus from the dances. If any datue 
is financially unsuccessful, the deficit 
must be made up by the committee. 
Consequently any price quoted as a sub- 
scription to a dance is the actual ( ost 
divided by the estimated number that 
will attend. 

If there were a little more co-oixr.ition, 
rather than criticism, perhaps student 
organiziitions such as the Senate, In- 
formal Committee, and the like, could 
function to a better degree. 

Walter A. Maclinn, Chatrmun 






®n an6 off tbc "Row 






The co-eds are preparing for a big 
week-end — every fraternity on the row- 
is making the telephone ring getting 
dates for its pledges to ts'-ort to the big 
shebang after the Amherst game. All 
houses have promised orchestras and 
special decorations. The sororities have 
even co-operated by canceling their own 
teas. 



COMMUNITY CONCERTS 

Definite dates for the Community 
Concerts to be offered both in Amherst 
and in Springfield have been announced 
promising an imposing schedule as well 
as a variety of artists. 

The dates of the Amherst concerts arc 
as follows: November 3, the Hrosa 
String Quartette; January 10, Toscha 
Seidel, violinist; February 27, the Chern 
avisky Trio; April 19, Nelson Eddy, 
baritone. These concerts will be given 
ir College Hall at 8.30 p.m. The Spring- 
field concerts to be given are Januar> 19, 
Albert .Spaulding. violinist; March C, 
Harold Bauer, pianist. 



An extract from the Bowdoin Orient, 
"It is a distinct pleasure to Bowdoin 
football followers to read of Louis Bush 
of Mass. State running wild through all 
opposition and clicking up amazing point 
totals after witnessing the Bears throttle 
the State flash a few weeks ago." A 
little of it goes a long way. 

If you have a good flexible tongue try 
to pronounce this word, "skrzypce." 
ss 

What do you think of this one? A 
freshman asked Dr. RadclifTe to give him 
a physical examination and especially to 
measure his chest correctly. Then the 
frosh sent this measurement to a mail- 
order house for a new suit. 
■ — — ss 

Down at Temple University the foot- 
ball coach is serving cocktails to his 
players before the opening kick-olT and 
between the halves. These cocktails are 
a mixture of sugar and lemon juice and 
are a source of immediate body energy. 



Just to be different Alpha Gamma Rho 
and K.E. are combining forces to give a 
banquet at the K.E. house followed by 
a dance at the Hotel Perry. 



It is rumored that Sig Ep has gone 
bachelor. 



The Qutes are taking advantage of 
having an artist in the house by having 
their portraits done by Steve Hamilton. 



Sig Ep is advertising for a muscular 
music teacher to train if not restrain 
those who insist on singing at 2 a.m. 



NOTICE 

Taylor M. Mills '29. who is with the 
advertising firm of Batton. Barton. 
Durstine, and Osborn. will speak on the 
relation between advertising and s;ile*- 
manship to Miss Foley's class in sales- 
manship on Saturday morning. October 
2<), at 8.30 in Room 114. Stockbridge. 
Anyone who is interested is invited to 
attend. 



• In the past twelve years Bernard 
B Clausen, a speaker very popular 
H among the students at Syracuse 
" I niversit y, has preached to over 

l,200,tHK) people at his regular services 

in the Svracuse ( luin li. 



NEW PICTURES ON EXHIBITION 

(Continued from Paite 1) 

churches. New England landscapes in 
winter, pictures of summer scenes, and 
the glory of autumn foliage, are among 
the best in the exhibition. One water 
color. "Indian Summer." was p?inted 
this fall on our own campus. 

"Serenity," "Sunset," "Candlelight," 
"Evening." and "Morning Sun" are 
examples of Mr. Hamilton's efforts to 
catch the effect of light. "Menemgha 
Bight." "Old Wharves." "Gloucester," 
and "Three Boats" are attempts at sea 
scenes with which he is not so familiar. 
Massachusetts State College has an 
artist all her own, and one whose exhibi- 
tion is wed worth a visit to the Memorial 
Btid lint;. Stitihen Hamilton when a 
student her.' was in the class of 1031 



PROFESSOR COLLIER WILL 

SPEAK AT NEXT ASSEMBLE 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

professorships at Columbia and Brown^ 
He is the author of several book- and 
articles in national magazines and the 
Encyclopaedia Britannica. amoni; thern 
"A New World in the Making; ' His 
degrees are Doctor of Philosoj' ^ and 
Doctor of the Humanities. 

Scholarship Day assembly dilTc trom 
the Phi Kappa Phi assembly held in the 
spring term in two ways. They are^ 
(1) Scholarship day is broader tn '^^j 
scope in that it recognizes scholar^, ip 
all kinds and is sponsored soleh t'V |^J 
college; (2) Whereas Phi Ka!>! » f" 
assembly recognizes only those vi ' '^j'^^ 
been outstanding in scholarship i'^"^ ' 
s{X)nsored by the national societ; 

Dr. George Olds, former pr< . _^ 

.\mherst College spoke at t? ^^^^ 
scholarship assembly which was 
years ago. Dr. George Via' ' 
president of the Rockefeller 1 ' 
was the speaker last year. 



;m-I 



majoring in Landscape Architc 
is a member of Q.T.V. fraterni' 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 19« 



♦ SPORTS 



♦ 



•*• 



S^HRINA ELEVEN HAS 

A POWERFUL ATTACK 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

y\ ,;(H)ii and White attack of the Taube- 
„), 1: has rcjiled up 1.3.3 points to its 
n.,;„,uents' 2t>. Last year Coach .Mel 
l.iiiiic introduced the Rcnkne style of 
loD'.li.ll at Massachusetts State and his 
t^rM eleven vancjuished .\mherst 13-12 in 
;i \i ry close, hard-fought contest. Coach 
]!,. 1 Jordan, former captain of the 
I niwTsity of Pittsburg team, and assist- 




Captain George L. Cadigan 

ant co.ich at Colgate under Pop Warner 
and .\ndy Kerr, has drilled his players 
in the Warner system, the double-wing 
back formation. The Warner style de- 
mands open football and the Sabrina 
eleven has become famous this year for 
its excellent execution of intricate pass 
formations. The pet play of the Amherst 
eleven is a lateral pass, Warner to 
Thompson. The use of Jack Thompson, 
a K'lard on the receiving end of this 
formation gives this play its punch. 
•Another strong Amherst scoring play is 
a lateral-forward formation; a Sabrina 
hark throws a pass to his strong-sid.* end, 
who then flips a lateral pass to English, 
the .\mherst center. Besides the de- 
eeidive aerial offence of the Lord Jeffs, 
Coach Jordan has included in the Am- 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 0) 



BUSH .\ND SHEFF STAR 

FOR MAROON .\ND WHITE 
(Continued from Page 1) 

In the first period both elevens played 
cautious football with Massachusetts 
State on the offense the greater part of 
the quarter. Bush had been unsuccessful 
in several attempts to skirt the Tech 
ends, who were playing very wide, but 
finally the State star raced 38 yards 
through the Engineers defense for the 
first .Massachusetts score. Joe Sheff 
failed to convert the extra point by a 
place kick. Worcester Tivh's defense 
tightened considerably in the second 
cjuarter and the State eleven was not 
able to score. State stop|)ed a Tech 
drive for a touchdown on its 2()-yard line 
and then Jtxr Sheff booted the best punt 
seen on .Alumni Field this year. Sheff's 
kick from the State 20-yard line traveled 
sixty-yards in the air and rolled outside 
on the Engineers' 25-yard line, a total 
gain of 75 yards. 

In the third [n'riod Captain Leary and 
Smith broke through the Tech line and 
blocked a punt, State recovering the ball 
on the Engineers' l.'>-yard line. Jck* .Shelf 
on the next play slashed through tackle 
for the second State score. 

.After se\eral minutes of play in the 
final quarter, Bush electrified the crowd 
of four thousand by recei\ ing a Worcester 
kick near the State goal-line and racing 
through the entire Tech team for the 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 4) 

Fresh Cross-Country Team 
Defeats Amherst Seconds 



In the infcjrmal cross-country races 
last Thursday, the .Amherst Junior 
\arsity lost to the State freshmen. 22-.'")2; 
while the Lord Jeff freshmen proved tcKi 
fast for the State Jayvees, winning their 
race, 23-32. .Although Amherst had its 
ace, Waldo Sweet, running for the 
Siibrina seconds, the State frosh, by- 
bunching Proctor, Bishop, Craft, P. B. 
Anderson, and Dunker close tcjgether, 
won the meet. Sweet was the outstand- 
ing individual runner, covering the three- 
mile course in 14:18 to win his race. In 
the other event, Halstead of Amherst '3(» 
captured individual honors followed by 
two of his team-mates. Jordan and Kiel 
tied for 4th, while Daniels placed dth. 
Gurka 7th. and Shaw 10th. 

The summary: 

Mass. State Jay V'ees vs. Amtierst '36 placed 
in the- followinK order: Halstead (A) 1st, VVorseby 
(A) '^Jnd, Allison (A) .'ird. tie for 4lh between 
Jordan an<r Kiel Iwth of (M), Daniels (M), Gurka 
(M), Lund (A), Shaw (M). Time: 15:10. 

Mass. State '.36 vs. Amherst Jay Vees placed 
in the followinR order: Sweet (A), Proctor (M). 
Bishop (.M). (raft (.M). Opi>er (A), P. A. Bnder- 
8on (M). Dunker (.M). Purcell (M). Goddard (M). 
Lewis (M). Hager (.M). Moore (A). Miner (M). 
H. A. Johnson fM), DeWilde (M). Warner (A). 
Wildner (M). Allen (M). Grovet (A). 



TVl'KWRITER RIBBONS— for all makes of Typewriters 

TVi'KWRITER PAPER— 500 sheets 79c 

Duchess Bond, a very nice paper. 500 sheets $1.25 
Copy Paper. 100 sheets 10c— 500 sheets 45c 



A. J. Hastings 



NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



TVl'ING— .MIMEOGRAPHING 
DICTATION 

MISS MABEL MEAKIN 

Front Bement Coal Offices 
low Rates Tel. 232 

^"U have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 
And that's the 

AMH[RST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

'■'■odyear Welt System Employed" 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' lYescriptions lilled. Broken lenses 

accuratily replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

S PLEASANT STREE T, (up one flight) 

IDA M. BRIDGEMAN 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst. Mass. 



Candles 

M . 



HALLOWE'EN 

Everything for the night 

Noise Makers 
Napkins 
Table Covers 
Nut Cups 



Skeletons 
Games 
Lanterns 
Hats 



JAMES A, LOWELL, Bookseller 



The entire faculty and student body 
extends deep sympathy to Jch* I.ojko, 
varsity (juartcrback. whos*- father was 
accidentally killed in Northampton 
last week. The members of the fiKtt- 
ball team sent a floral piece to the 
I.ojko home as an expression of s\iu 
pathy. 



SW)RTS CALENDAR 



Thursday. October 37 

Varsity ScK.cer, Amherst at Mass. State 
Interfraternity athletics, Alpha (iuiinnu Kho 

vs. y.T.V. 
Mass. Cross-country Jayvees vs. Aniher.st 

Jayvifs at Amherst; Mas^. State "M\ 

vs. .'Xiuherst '30 in Cross-country at 

Amherst 
Friday. October 28 

interfraternity .s|>orts. Phi Sigma Kap|>a 

vs. Lambda ("hi Alpha 
Saturday, October 29 

N'iirsity lootball. Amherst at .Mass. Stale 
\arsity cross-country. Anilierst at Mass. 

State 
Tuesday, November 1 

Intcrlrateriiity si>orts, Theta Chi vs. Lambda 

Chi Alpha 
Wednesday, November 2 

Intorfr.iternity si>orts, Kapiia Epsilon vs. 

VTX. 
Thursday, November 3 

Interfraternity siiorts. Sittma I'hi Epsilon 

vs. Alpha SiKma I'hi 
In cross-country. Ma.ss. State Junior Varsity 

vs. State '1)6 over freshiiian course. 



^ (Thru tbc l^not Dole |; 
.^«^^^^^^«{^^«{^«^^<{^ 

Dovie Bush and Joe -ShetTt limbed Mt. 
llolyoke the morning of the Worcester 
Tech game with a geology class looking 
for rink strata. In view of the splendid 
(•erforniances of Bush and Shell in the 
Tech contest. Coach M t\ Taube is con- 
sidering a hike to the summit of .Mt. 
Molyoke for the entire foothall scpiad the 
morning of the Amherst game. 



For the first time in the history of the 
college the varsity football team will hold 
closed practice this week. 



Bush is still leading the eastern cul 

legiate scorers with 84 points in five 

games. Montgomery is second with 02 
points. 

Massachusetts -State ranks 19th among 
the eastern colleges this year. Amherst 
College is in the 2(>th place. 

Brown 1 1 Tufts 

Union 13 Rensselaer 



Ben Cummings. varsity tackle, came 
into the fraternity after the Worcester 
game with a bleeding lip. A feminine 
admirer, noticing his wound, cried pas- 
sionately. "Oh. Benny, you cut your lip 
in the game today." Ben (who never 
tells a lie) answered apologetically, ".No, 
I'm sorry, I just cut it shaving after the 
game." La femme, with a crestfallen and 
disappointed face muttered, "Oh" and 
left poor Ben wondering. . . 



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LADIES' RUBBER HEELS .30 

LADIES' LEATHER HEELS .25 

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LEATHER 
HAND BAGS 

Capacious and Strong 

Miss Cutler's Gift Sliop 



Soccer Team Beats Clark; 
State Harriers Beat Tech 



FIRST THREE PLACES GO 
TO MAROON RUNNERS 

Capturing the lirst three jiositions .ind 
pl.uing five men in the hrst eight, the 
M.issiichusetts .State cross-country team 
scored its second virtory of the season 
last S.ilurday i)y setting back the Win 
cester Tech harriers 2(1 .'{.'i on the .State 
four mile course. B«>b Murray, the sen 
s.ilional sophomore runner, again clipped 
the course record this time cutting it 
lti..{ secoinls. 

With Bob Icidiiin the way, the .State 
runners fought with their opponents for 
the leading places at the start. The 
Tech h.irriers were not botheretl by 
I'rexy's Hill, hut by the time that Kast 
IMeasiint Street was reached, the Maroon 
and White runners lengthened out an<l 
(inched their places for the fnial count. 
Captain Caird and Red Crawford finished 
again together in second place, leading 
their Tech rivals by a gomi length at the 
end, while Little finished in si.xth pl.n e 
and Crosby, in eighth. The other two 
State h.irriers. Russ Snow and Bob .Mien, 
came in 1 1th and l,Uli respectively. 

The summary: 

Won hy Murray (M). tic for 2ncl. Caird an'' 
Crawford Loth of (M). 4th Hr.-w.r (W). .1th 
Frary (W), «th Little (M). 7th Mckinley (W), 
Mh troshy (M), <lth A. Moran (VV), lOth Knthe- 
MU.h (W), 11th Snow (.M), llJth Granuer (W). 



I'<th Allen (M). Time 
record). 



iJIm. 2!*. 7s. (new course 



Slate Hill and Dalers 

Meet Amherst Saturday 

Saturday the State harriers run the 
F.onl Je(T men over the formers' course, 
finishing as last week on Alumni Field 
between the halves of the fcKitball game. 
.Amherst has not a strong team this year 
and the Martxm and White harriers 
should be able to continue their winning 
streak, since last Friday Tufts defeated 
Amherst 27-2<>. Only the Sjiturday be- 
fore State tlowned Tufts, IT-liH. 

.Although the team as a whole is not 
ttKj strong, the Siibrinas |)ossess several 
runners who will bear watching. Swtet, 
their outstanding jM-rformer. will run 
against State his oily other afipearante 
this year in varsity cross-country being 
in the Little Three meet. Mill, who has 
led the Lord JefT runners in every race 
this season, will also a|>pear in this race. 
The home team will be represented by 
its usual line-u|); and with Murray, 
Caird, and Crawfortl fighting for posi- 
tions in the first rank, the Maroon and 
White should l)e well re|»resente<f in the 



HOOTERS TAKE NINTH 
STRAIGHT VICTORY 

With a .'{ 1 \i(tor> tntr CI. irk Univer- 
sity here last Thurstlaj, the .Mass. .State 
soccer team collected its ninth straight 
win. The defeat of Clark was the setond 
game of the >ear for the .Maroon and 
White hooters; antl it was through the 
superior j>lay of the St.ite men that 
Clark was w»)r»tetl. 

During the whole game, the team 
clicketl better than at any time before 
and managetl to keep the ball well into 
the opponents' territory most of the time. 
The forwards played heads-up soccer; 
while the halfbaiks blo< ked practically 
every attempt t)f the Clark men to near 
the State goal. 

In the first few minutes of play, the 
Mar(N>n and White team t(H)k the ball 
and pushed it deep into Clark's territory. 
Ileinenway, the University left back, 
tried to kick the ball clear; but in so 
doing, he accidentally booted it back 
over his head and past his goalie. Brierly 
of the S<-arlet team e(|iialled the score in 
the second periinl when through his in- 
dividual playing he scored on a long 
kitk, the wet ball slipping by Dobbie. 
the State goalie. 

Jatkson placed State safely ahead in 
the third jxriud by s<-orinn aftir ;i neat 
(Continued on Page 4, Column i) 

Briggs* Men Ready for 
Annual Amherst Game 

To«lay the Bay State hooters entertain 
their Lord Jeflf opponents in the first 
varsity contest for this f.ill between the 
t<»wii riv.ils. Amherst brings a team 
which will furnish the strongest 0|)po- 
sition yet to f.it e the State undefeated 
team. 

Although Amherst has been defeated 
twice, both losses were to very strong 
teams. One of those was to the renowned 
Mtdill team, 5-2; while the other was 
suffered at the hands of Harvard. 2-0. 
The one victory of the .S;d)rinas was over 
Worcester Tech, .'{-0; while last .Saturday 
the I'urple btxrters tied the Wesleyan 
team, 2-2. St.ite s»» far this season has 
(ContiniMd on Pag* 4, Columo 5) 



first five positions. The other men, 
running f<»r State will be Crosby, Little, 
.Snow, and Allen. From this group will 
come the last two s<orers, with Little 
and Crosby being the logical men to 
place. 



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HIE MASSACIIUSKTTS COLI.EGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1932 



NETTLETON SHOES 

Men who buy NeHlet(,n Slu.rs (-(,ntlnue t«, luni lo ihese shoes for each new pair, because satisfaction is 

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THOMAS F. WALSH 



POLITICAL LEAGUE TO HOLD 

RALLY FRIDAY NIGHT 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
with the co-operation of the Executive 
Committee, consisting; of Myles Boylan 
•30, DenuKTat, Samuel (iiimore "Mi, Re- 
publican, and VViliiani Semanie '3.'i, 
S«Kialist. 

At Assembly next week a straw vote 
will be conducted to determine which of 
the presidential candidates is favored by 
the student body, the results to be pub- 
lished in the next issue of the Collegian. 



The following are the rules for Dad's 
Day entertainments: 



HOOD DAIRY SCHOLARSHIPS 

GIVEN TO THREE STUDENTS 
(Continued from Pufte 1) 
Dr. Hood's gift provides for scholar- 
ships to be awarde.l to a member of 
each of the four undergraduate classes. 
The senior, junior, antl sophomore awards 
have been made, and the freshman 
scholarship will be awarded at the end of 

this term. 

These scholarships are restricted to 
major students in the Division of Agri- 
culture and to students specializing m 
some phase of dairy industry promotion 
in the junior and senior years. 

Secretary Robert D. Hawley, Dean 
William L. Machmer and Treasurer Fred 
C. Kenney ma<le up the committee 
which awarded the Hood Dairy Scholar- 
ships. 

POPULAR RESPONSE TO 

DAD'S DAY PROGRAM 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
quently in daily papers, while responses 
from parents who intend to visit the 
campus on Dad's Day have been arriving 
in encouraginR numbers. 

The fraternities and sororities are al- 
ready hard at work on their seven- 
minute skits for the evening's entertain- 
ment, while the attraction of the morning 
will be the fmir-liour exhibition pre- 
sented by the Military Department. All 
classes will be exhibited in drill work 
while the Advanced classes will perform 
between U).:«) and U.dO. The .supper in 
the evening at Draper Mall will consist 
of a complete chicken dinner, the tickets 
for which may be obtained at the time 
of the registrations of the Dads. Stu<lents 
may accompany their Dads to Draper 
Hall without being required to purchase 
the dinner. The tickets for the repast 
will be 7.">c. 

The committee desires that all stu- 
dents who have not alread\ written home 
to d<j so at once with the object in view 
of inviting the Dads to the most memor- 
able guest (ia\ of the year. 



FR.\TKRNITir:S A.ND SORORITIES 
1. Acts must 1m.' no more thiiii 7 minutes in 

2 The Roister Doisters will furnish screens 
and ti iKuk drop if these arc desired \>y a numl>er 
of Kroups. Other proix-rties and costumes must 
be provided by the group putting on the l>er- 
formance. . . i if, 

:i. liach group must provide someone to sunt 
its properties on and off the stage under suix-r- 
vi.sion of the entertainment committee. 

4. Kach group must be ready to present a 
complete dress rehearsal in Bowker Auduonum 
on Thursday evening. November .5 at ' '•> " i'""-"- 
Failure to be pre.s»'nt for tir- rehearsal will cause 
that group not present to 1k' barred from the show 

on Saturday, 1,11 ,,. ..nv 

The entertainment committee will delete any 
part of any i>c-rformance, or the whole iM-rforinance, 
as it s«'es tit. .1 „ 7 

Any ix-rforniance which runs more than 1 
minutes at the dress rehearsal will be barred 
from the show on Saturday. No new (lerforinance 
will be allowed to replace the one barred. 

5. Kach act or performance must !«• repeat d 
on Saturday exactly as it was presented at the 
dress rehearsal, as far as form and content arc 
concerned, except for sui h changes as the enter- 
taiiiiiienl committee may suggest. „,. ,1,.. 

Failure to comply with this rule will cause R 
olYendiiiM at t or iK-rtormance to t>e barred from | 
the comiM-tilion. ..;„..„ ., 

(i Kach art or i)erformance shall be given a 
name by the group making the presentation. 

7. Judges will be clios.-n by the .\cademic 
Activities Hoard and will announce their tle- 
.isions imnuiliately after tfic show on Siiturday 
night, November .''•th. 

Entertainment Committee of 
L)ad's Oay Committee 
Frcilurick G. Clark, Chotrman 



Membership in the club is open to 
those who have had experience in chorus, 
glee club or choir work. Interested 
prospects may present themselves for 
admission to the glee club by seeing 
Manager CosgrifT at the Sigma I'hi 
ICpsilon house. 

The present members: 

First Tenors: John Barter 'US, Fred 
Clark "M, Dave CosgrifT "M, Joseph 
Cleary '35 (soloist), James Clapp "M. 

Second Tenors: Paul Stephenson '.'«, 
William Tyler Smith '33, Roger Bates 
•34, Sumner '35, Law '3b. 

First Basses: Ed Talbot '34, Bob 
Dorey '34, Curtis Clark '35, Fred Bull 
'3t). 

Secoml Basses: Walter Papp '34, 
Roger .\lton '34, Wallace Chesbro '34, 
Vernon Bell '35, Dante Zukor '35, ilall '30. 



COLLEGE COMMITTEE 

AIDS LOCAL JOBLESS 

(Continued from Pafte I) 
ment Relief Committee. Four hundred 
dollars of the money was given to the 
town of Longmeadow under certain con- 
ditions. 

Upon the recommendation of Governor 
Ely, the various departments of the state 
donatetl a portion of their s;daries to the 
relief of the unemployed. The college as 
a part of the state educational system 
accepted Covemor Ely's suggestion, but 
decided to spend the money coming from 
the college employees in the town of 
Amherst, rather than contribute the 
money to a common fund in Boston for 
the relief of the Boston unemployed. 

The fund was instituted over a year 
ago and at present there is no indication 
that the fund will be continued another 
year. 



HOOTERS TAKE NINTH 

STRAIGHT VICTORY 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 

pass from Mackimmie. From then on 
the State team outplayed the Scarlet 
hooters who showed the lack of proper 
training and were unable to maintain the 
speed set by the better trained charges 
of Briggs. Out of the many shots that 
were made at the Clark goal, one more 
passed safely through in the last period, 
when after only three minutes of play in 
the last quarter Kozlowski scored on a 
pass from Bob Jackson. 

The summary: 

Mass. State 



BUSH AND SHEFF STAR 

FOR MAROON AND WHITE 

(Continued from Pafte J) 

third Massachusetts touchdown. Later 
in the period, Sheff dropped back to the 
5U-yard line and hurled a beautiful 
27-yard pass to Bush who cantered over 
the Engineers' goal line for the final 
State touchdown. ShelT plunged through 
center for the extra point. 

Bush, ShefT and Bigelow featured in 
the State backfield, while the aggressive 
Massachusetts leader. Captain Leary, 
Smith and Ryan starred in the line. 

The line-up: 

Mass. State Worcester Tech 

Mountain, le re, -Mc.Nulty, Brewer 

Sievers, R. Cumniing, It , , , ,0.1 

rt, Uodgkinson, Cruikshank. Booth 
Burke. Leavitt. Moran. Ik rg, Lawton, Spencer 
Leary. Griswold, c c, Maggiacomo, Skwarck 

Sibson, BickJord, Nietupski, rg . u t\ 

Ig, Peterson, A. Bell 

Mulhall. Cumraings, Dimarzio. rt 

U, Cantor. Nasaviicli 
Smith, Ryan, re le. MoUoy, Heller 

Bigelow, nb Ql>. hodii"". tosler 

Sheft, McKelligott, Landis, Savaria. Ihb 

rhb, Drake, Webster 
Bush, Consolatti, rhb , ,, Ihb, Urago 

Frigard, lb fb. Gould. Gartrell 



and seven sophomores as the nude:;, 1,,^ 
its eleven, while State has four si; iorj 
five juniors and three sophomores irom 
which the starting line-up will be ( l;usin 
The .Amherst line averaged 177 |i j md;, 
and the backfield 109 pounds. The 
Massachusetts State line aNeraged 171 
pounds and the backfield 104 poun' 

The starting line-ups: 

Mass. State Amhvrtt 

Mountain, le re, DeBivuis( 

Sievers, It rt. I'oti,., 

Leavitt, Ig rg, ThonipMjn 

c. I'-iilili^ 

It, teinburg 

1<'. \l0Mf, 

qb. \\;irn,-r 

rhb. Uoiiift 

Ihb. Cadigan ' ap,j 

fb. Kfhoe 



Leary, c (Capt.) 
Burke, rg 
iMulhall. rt 
Smith, re 
Bigelow. qb 
Bush, llib 
Sheff, rhb 
Frigard, fb 



NEW GLEE CLUB SHOWS 

BRILLIANT PROMISE 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
The glee club is fortunate in obtaining 
the services of Leonar<l Parker '35. as 
piano anil organ accompianist. Parker 
I)layed regularly for the Vale Freshmen 
C.lee Club all last year and is an artist of 
excellent ability. It is expected that he 
will contribute solos of some of the 
masters during concerts by the dub 
CosgrifT is manager of the club while 
Josejih Cleary '35 is tenor soloist. 



Dobbie, g 
Hodson. rb 
Cowing, lb 
Landsman, rh 
Blackburn, lb 
I'ruyne, ch 
Mai kiminie, ol 
Russell, or 
Jackson, c 
Kozlowski, ir 
Bernstein, il 



Clark Univ. 

K. Forrest 

rb, Wcsteiholni 

lb, Uemenway 

rh, Vinciguerra 

Ih, I^-htinen 

ch. Bens<m 

ol. Bibeau 

or. Shaiipy 

c, Brierly 

ir. Annish 

il. Grout 



^^Qensation '^ 

STEPS 

The sensational 

new Step-in by 

Nemo-Flex, molds 
to the fiyure and 

does not climb 

FISHER'S 2.50 and 5.00 



M.S. C. MENS MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"Let Dave do it" 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 




SABRINA ELEVEN HAS 

A POWERFUL ATTACK 
(Continued from Pafte i) 

herst attack straight line and spinner 
plays. 

In its first game of the season, Amherst 
defeated Colby 13-0. Next Amherst 
went out of its class to engage Princeton 
in the second contest and was drubbed 
decisively 22-0. Howeve*-, the Sabrina 
attack functioned smoothly in the last 
three games; Amherst defeating Union 
13-0, Hamilton 13-0 and Wesleyan 6-0. 
In the contest with Wesleyan, Amherst 
played great football to stop Larry 
Schlums, the sensational Cardinal cap- 
tain, and pounded out a one-touchdown 
victory. Hob Warner plunged four yards 
through the Wesleyan line for the score 
after a steady Sabrina drive had carried 
the ball HO yards ilown the field. Captain 
fieorge Cadigan's cle\er ball-carr\ ing 
featured in the Amherst backfield while 
Bob Moses, a sophomore end lerl the 
Royal Purple line. 

During the week. Coach Mel Taube 
has been drilling his men on pass defense 
anil is confident of stopping the Sabrina 
aerial attack. Mass;ichusetts State's 
yreat performance against Worcester 
Teih and .Xinherst's unexpected defeat 
of Wesle\an strengthen the belief that 
both teams have great power on ofTense 
and defense and that the outcome is a 
toss-up. 

.\nilurst has three seniors, three juniors 



BRIGGS* MEN READY FOR 

ANNUAL AMHERST (,A\ik 
(Continued from Pago 3) 

playetl only two games; both of thtse 
were \ictories — one being a 2-1 win from 
W.P.I. and the other a 3-1 triumph over 
Clark. 

Last year the Sabrina team was maik 
up mostly of inexperienced players, Ijut 
this time their hooters will invade the 
State campus with a well-seasoned team. 
On the defensive they will probahiy rely 
on Captain Tom Greenough and I'hil 
Ward, two brilliant players. In the 
front line men, Smith, .\llis, and Clifton 
and the star center, Davidson, will 1^ 
most of the offensive punch with whiih 
the Sabrinas hojie to win. To meet the 
Purple attack, the Maroon and White 
will furnish a strong defensive line, made 
up of Hwlson, Cowing, Shuman, Pruyne. 
and Blackburn. The Lord Jeflf attacker* 
will find it almost impossible to hreak 
through that line, while their backs will 
be occupied in stopping the diversified 
tactics of the State forwards. All of these 
menMackimmie, Taft, Jackson, Koz- 
lowski, and Bernstein- are keen iMHitirs 
and will keep the .Amherst goalie hu?y 
trying to prevent their scoring. 
The probable line-up: 
Mass. .State 



Typing 
First Class Work bow Rates 

MARICN BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494 -M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



Ihurs.-FrL, Oct. 27-28 

Marlene Dietrich 

in 

"BLONDE VENUS" 



Amhfrtt 

r><)l)bif, B , *■ ••""- 

Hodson. rit) rfb. F.;i-'!: -. 

(owinc. Ht> lfi>- <'r"i-' • 

TaU)ot. Sliuman. Lanflsman, rtib rhb, Il.in - 

I'riiyne. ebb , I'll' ^"^ 

BUukhurn. Ibb llib. II -- 

.Mackiiiitiiie, or of' ■' ^' 

Taft.ir , ;r. K 

Jackson, rf <f. Dav- .: 

Kozlowski. il il. Clifton. Snijtti 

Bfrnst.in. ol "' Mln 



The house in solemn council sat, 
Kach ringed seat was tilled. 
\ group of pledges came to chat. 
.■Mas, no phn e for a K.E. man. 
Olympian Cl-.esbro raised his voice, 
"Here's a seat for two," he trilled. 



Saturday, Oct. 29 

Jack Holt - Evalyn Knapp 

J. Farrell Mac Donald 

in 

-THIS SPORTING AGE" 



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College Drug Store 

VV. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



Wednesday, Nov. 2 
Ruth Chatterton 

in 
"THE CRASH" 



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Boots, Breeches, Coats, and Sweaters for Ladies and Gentlemen. 
All kinds of Sport Wear for Students at Special Prices. 

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At over Anihvrat In fuulbuli 

ji. iwlce in sud'eMiun. 



VoL XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1932 



Number 6 



College Political League 
Hears Three Major Parties 



COMPARISONS OF PRINCIPLES 

GIVEN BY SPEAKERS 



Comparisons between the three major 
political parties were made at a rally 
conducted by the Political League of the 
College last Friday night in Memorial 
Hall Dr. J. (i. Hanson, Mr. A. H. 
Stini.son, and Professor C. E. Warne 
were the respective speakers of the 
Democratic, Republican, and Socialist 
parties. Robert Hosford '.V.i, chairman 
„f the league, presided. 

Doctor Hanson, a prominent North- 
anit)ton physician and Democratic presi- 
dential elector, was the first speaker 
intHMliiced by .Mr. Hosford. In his 
opening words, Dr. Hanson attacked 
S<j»ialism as a degenerate theory of 
government now promulgated because of 
economic unrest. He said it would not 
be recognized today by its originators 
and that during all the ages since Christ, 
it has never been adopted by any people 
as an economic order. Explaining the 
principles of the Demotrratic party. Dr. 
Hanson said: "The Republican party is 
the party of the wealthy, of the capital- 
istic rulers of America and for this reason 
advocates high protec-tive tarilTs for the 
protection of this group. The Demo- 
cratic party, on the other hand, is the 
party of the common man of the laborer 
and for this reason denounces the pro- 
tective tariff as injurious to the groups 
of common people. They propose tariff 
for revenue only." Dr. Hanson then 
anal\ze«l the platform of the DenKx-nitic 
partN as it was adoptetl in the national 
ron\ention last June. 

Mr. Stimson, a prominent Republican 
in .Northampton, spoke on the Republican 
platform. He defended the tarilT and 
other planks of the parly platform and 
attacked the Denuxratic attemi>ts to 
lower the tarilT s;iying that such an 
action would ruin .\merica's industrial 
world. Me said: "The Republican party. 
through control t)f Congree, has ruled 
.Xnierica for almost eighty years with but 
two excejrtions. Those except i<jns were 
once under Cleveland and once under 
(Continued on Pafte 3, Column 4) 



PROF. KELLOGG SPEAKS 
AT LIBRARY NOV, 10 



To Explain Movies on Honey 
Production 



The Realm of the Honey fk-e" is the 
iiile of a picture to be shown at the 
Jones Library on Thursday, November 
!'•. during the National Honey Week 
from Novcmlier 7 to 12 according to an 
annoiinrement made by I'rofessor C. R. 
Kfllogg <if the Entomology department. 

SiKinsored by the American Honey 
Institute, National Honey week was 
established to interest the American 
people in honey. There will be three 
"•itional broadcasts during the week. 
Professor Kellogg will explain the four 
'«•! iiim to be shown at the Jones Li- 
'irv on Thjrs<lay flight, November K) 
'■'*■' o'clock. This picture was made 
' ind honey experts from the De- 

I'lrtjiunt of .\griculture. The pjblic is 
invitr 1 to attend the presentation. 



Sunday Chapel Audience 
Hear Phelps of Yale 

"IS such a thing as having too 
J"uch foresight," stated Professor William 
'-V^^n Phelps of Yale University who 
*K'ke of "The Tranquil Mind" at the 
||''*t Siinday chapel of the year on October 
'■^ this time the musical selection 
■ '« Mnria was most pleasingly rendered 
'■ -If. Clarence H. F'arsons. accom- 
Pani.-,i y Roger Bates 'M at the organ 
and Kcit;,ir Sorton 'S:i on the violin. 

•^'1 physical efforts increase in diffi- 
"^^y "■".ith the desire to do them," he 
'Continued on Page 2, Column 5) 



Debates Arranged for 

1932-33 Schedule 



Visits to Five Colleges Listed for 
Varsity Debating Team 



Debates with the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Rutgers University, the College of 
the City of New York, .Xinerican Inter- 
national College, and Springfield C(jllege 
are scheduled for the coming season by 
the Debating Society according to 
Manager .Nathaniel H. Hill "M. 

There are an unusualU' large number 
of candidates out for the team this year, 
and because of this fact there will be 
three teams, the X'arsity, Freshmen, and 
Co-ed teams. .Manager Hill, ex|)ects to 
s<hedule debates for the freshmen an<l 
co-ed teams during the winter and spring 
terms. This is the first time in the 
history of debating at this college that 
teams have been comjxjsed solely of co-eds. 

During the vacation week between the 
second and third terms, the week of 
March 20, the varsity team will travel to 
Philadelphia, New Brunswick, New Jer- 
sey, and New York City. The debate 
with the University of Pennsylvania will 
take place in the afternocjn and will be 
broadcasted over station WC.\U. That 
(Continued on Pafte 3, Column I) 

STATE NIGHT TO BE 

NOV. 10 THIS YEAR 

Meetintis to Re Held in Several Cities 
As Part of National Olebration 

On 'rhurs<lay evening. No\ ember 10, 
various lities all over the countrv will be 
the scenes of the secontl animal .State 
Night. The meetings this year are ex- 
pe<ted to be bigger and better than ever 
judging from the enthusiastic re|)orts of 
the .Munmi office. 

Representatives from the (oUege are 
booked ui) to speak at various places. 
.\mong them are l'resident-ele<t Hugh 
P. Baker and Kx-Presid<nt Roscoe W 
Thatcher who will both speak at the 
meeting in Ithaca, N. Y. The other 
siH"akers in«lude Dean William L. Mac h- 
mer at C.reenfield; Fred Silvers an<l .Mel 
laube at Hartford; Robert 1). Hawley 
at Washington, D. C; Curry S. Hicks 
at Danvers. Mass., and Km < i ray son at 
Providi-nce, R. I. 

Enthusiastic Rally and 

Bon Fire Last Friday 

As a means of arousing interest in the 
ap!)roa( hing .Andierst game, one of the 
most successful rallies in the history of 
the college was held on the night of 
October 28. The rally, held under the 
joint guidance of the Senate and .Vlelphia, 
startecl in front of the Memorial Building 
at 0.1. T and (<iogressed <lown the Row. 
Singing the Medley and cheering the 
team, the group, led by a forty piece 
impromptu band, grew rapidly. As it 
left the campus groun<ls three hundred 
student- wire marching, and at the 
Q.T.X . house another hundred had 
swelled the ranks. At Triangle Street 
the singers turned back lo campus, 
stopping to give Captain Leary a cheer. 

When once back on campus, everyone 
rallied about a huge bonfire on the 
South College Drill Fidd. The cheer- 
leaders and the ban<l took charge in an 
attemi)t to make the vselkin ring as cheer 
after cheer and song after song was given. 
Cliff Foskett, captain of the team that 
defeated .Xmherst last year and a cfxich 
of this ye.irV, was the first speaker, lb- 
compared the relative strength of the 
two teams, the Warner anfl Notre Dame 
systems, and from his own experience 
gave assurance of victory. Ceorge E. 
"Red" Emery '24 concluded the f)rogram 
after reading an All-Faculty football 
team. 



CONCERT SEASON OPENS 
WITH STRING QUARTET 

Popular London .\rtists to Appear at 
Colletie Ilall This Evening 

.Amherst's first Communit\- Concert of 
this season will feature the Bros;! String 
(Juartet of London tm Thursday evening 
at 8.;{() in the old College I bill at .\ndierst 
College. This group of musicians ap|X'ar- 
ed at Smith College last year and was so 
pojndar as to be engaged there for two 
concerts this coming seas«in. Members 
of the concert associalicui have a real 
opi)ortunity in being able to hear the 
cpiartet here. 

l he group, consisting of Ant'nii" 
Brosa, first violin; David Wise, second 
violin; Leonard Rubens, viola, and Livio 
M.mnucci, 'cello, was formed at London 
in U(2.'). It made its first public appear- 
ance the following year at one of a series 
of im|M)rtant concerts given at Wigmore 
hall in the English capital. Since then 
the ensemble has appeared with increas- 
ing success in England, (iermany, France, 
Holland and Italy. 

In l'.t.'{(( the Brosas made a niemorable 
debut in America at Mrs. Elizabeth 
Sprague Coolidge's festivals of chamber 
nuisic- held at Chic-ago and Washington, 
followed by e(]ually briilinat a])|>earances 
at New York 

Olin Downc-s, music critic of the New 
York Times, spoke as follows of the 
fjuartet: "The tone has unusually fine 
texture and euphony. The reading of the 
music was conspicuous for clarity and 
coherence. The |)erfornian«e made very 
clear each step in the secjuence of ideas 
;ind revealed the exceptional caie aiicl 
scnsitivi-ness of the nuisicians' approach 
to the work." 

The Brosiis will |)Iay three cpiartets of 

major importance Thur.sclay evening. 

The program will be as follows: 

Uu;irt<'l ill D minor fDealli and tin; Maiilc-n) 

Sihuherl 

All.Kr.i 

.Aiidaiitc (on motn 

S< licr/o, alli-Kru iiiulto 

I'rrsto 
(JiuirtPt in A minor, opus .II, No. 2 lirahms 

AlU'Kro noil tro|i|K> 

Ainl.inli' nioiliT.ito 

yuasi niinui'lto. iiioilerato 

Finale, allrKro non ansai 
•Juarlft in U major. No. 'J Hurodin 

AIli-Kfo nioiIiTato 

Stlicr/.o, allcK'o 

.Notliirno, undaiuc 

Finale: andanle-vivace 



Over Four Hundred Dads 
Expected Tliis Saturday 



Hoover Leads in College 

Presidential Results 



Thomas Ousts Roosevelt in Seven 
Out uf Nine Schools 

Recent balloting among New I'ngl.uid 
colleges revc-als the fact that Herbert 
Hoover is the student's choice for Presi- 
dc-nt. The results of the collegiate elec- 
tions contrasts strangely with the nation- 
wide l.itiriiry Pif^est Poll which gives 
Franklin Rcxjsevelt a considerable lead. 

Of the nine c-olleges re|Mir(ing lloovc-r 
received first place in each one while 
Thomas received second place in seven, 
and RcMisevelt in two. The number of 
votes cast for Hoover was a definite 
majority of all votes. The results were 
as follows: 

Hoover Thomas Roosevelt Foster 



.•\mherst .'{.''»« 


8.'i 


71 




Bowdoin HiKi 


102 


50 




Clark University VA) 


:5<t 


.•}8 


M 


Dartmcnith 1120 


274 


2r)5 


12 


Middlebury :{|8 


144 


4.'i 




MLT. i.m 


:hu 


:((X) 


32 


New Hampshire .'110 


.').') 


170 


I 


VN'esleyan .'{27 


11<) 


54 




Williams 411 


75 


77 


4 



HERBERT HOOVER 
STUDENTS' CHOICE 

Roosevelt Comes Second with Thomas 
,\ (;iose Third 

Herbert I loo\ ct is t he choic c- of .Massa- 
chusetts Stale- College students for presi- 
dent acc-ordiiig to the straw ballot con- 
ducted yesterday by the Plitiial League. 
Hoover received almost four times as 
many votes as RcKisevelt, who led Norman 
Thomas by only six votes. William Z. 
Foster, Communist candidate, received 
1.") votes, while the Soc i.ilist Labor candi- 
date, \ernc- L. Reynolds, received one- 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 3) 



CA.MPUS CALENDAR 



rii 



J :, ( .■ fiilher that knrrui hi^ rriin fhthl. 
-Shakespeare. Merihanl of Venirt 



Thursday. .Nov. % 

7..'40 p.m. ColloRJan Competition 
8,:{0p.m. Community Concert. Bro-Ki 
String Uuartet, CoIleKe Hal! 

Friday, Nov. 4 

( rix'i-ioiintry. St. Stephens at Annandale 
s.OO ti.m. Band R<-h<'.ir^il, Cane 
Saturday. Nov. f> 

Dacl's Day ■ ■ ■,, • i 

K..Wa.m -2 p.m. Refiislration in Memorial 

Building , „ , 

ft-10.:{0 a.m. In5p''''tion of all departments 
io:«>-ll a.m. F:<liil)ition. Military IJept. 
11 a.m.-12..'J0 p.m. Reieption to Uad s by 

Faculty memters and students. 

Memorial Hall 
P 4.V1.I.* p.m. Uunrhe<->n. Urniyrr Hall 
2 p.m. Varsity f'xHball. R.IM. at /Mumni 

Field 
6.'}f)-7.10 p.m. Dad's Day Supi)er, Speaker. 

Dean Machmer. Draiier Mall 
7.4."> p.m. Flntertainmcnts by Fraternities 

and Sororities 

Sunday. Nov. * , „ , ,- -- ,u 

riOOam. Chanel, Rev. J. G. Gilkey 

■JfKtpm Philharmonic Conc'Tf. MfnorKil 
Hall 

Monday, Nov. 7 

New FnKl.ind Interc»11e(tiate?, Boston 
«(H)p.m. Glee Club. Memorial Hall 

'^"'/!??p''m'^c'ampu.. Chorus. Memorial Hall 

WedneMlay, Nov. » 

H.OOp-m- O.chcstra Kehear»al 



I 



Total 4.''>41 1212 KMK) 8;{ 

FLOWER SHOW TO BE 
HELD NEXT WEEK-END 

New Arranftements Should Provide 
Interestinti Lxhibit 

F-xhibits from seven divisions of the 
college Department of Horticulture, the 
Stockbridge School, and the I'lorisls' 
and <iardeners' Clubs of llolyoke and 
Northampton will be- iiicliided in the 
Annual Flower Show to be held November 
1 I, 12, and 1.5 in the cage of the- Physical 
Lducatioii building. Willi the 22,(KK) 
s<|. It. of (jispl.iy ana available the 
[Missibilities of the l!t;{2 show f.ir exceed 
those- of jire-vious ye-ars. 

rinl.itive- plans cill for extensive use 
of the space- with a central fe-alure- 
.irranged bv' the c|c-|)artiiietit c)f L.inc! 
s< ,ipc- Architecture. Class and open coin- 
petitions as well as inctividiial c|is|)la>s 
aiicl eclucat ional exhibits will achl interest 
t<J the show. Student inlc-rcst is wide- 
spread in antici[>ation of a llowe-r show 
of re-al merit . 

Wilfred IL Bedord '.{.l h«-ads the general 
committc-e of students and is assisted by 
William P. Hager '.!;!, Samuel R. (lilmofe 
(Continued on Pafte 3, Column 5) 

Dr. Gilkey to Speak at 
Coming Sunday Chapel 

Dr. James (i. (iilkey, of tin- Siiitli 
Congregational Church in Springfield, 
will address the Sunday Cha(M'l NovenilM-r 
<) in Bowker Auditorium. Always inter- 
ested in. ami interesting to students, Dr. 
Ciilkey is a man of remarkably slice t-ssful 
versatility in literary, swxial, an«l edii- 
• aticmal, is well as religious, fields. He 
is always enthusiastically received by a 
S'.uclent audience. 

A graduate of Harvard in l'.U2, Dr. 
Ciilkey received his S\..\. d«-gree the 
following year, then went abrojid to 
study at the University of Berlin and 
.Marburg in Germany and graduatc-d 
with a Bachelor of Divinity degree from 
Union Theological Seminary in HtHi. 
[3r. fiilkey carries on an e^xtensivc jiro- 
gram of institutional charity work in 
connection with his ministerial activities. 

The speaker is a trustee of the V.M. 
C.A. College in Springfield and has been 
[iresident of the- Springfield Symjihony 
f)rchestra since l'.)24. His numerous 
literary works are csf»ecially attractive 
to young people. Among them are: 
"Faith fc»r the- New C.eneration." "Secrets 
of FtTec tive Living," "Certainty of Ciexl " 



MO.SI SUCCKSSFUL DADS 

DAY IS PKKDICTKI) 

According to latest reports from coni- 
miltc-e- chairman Costas Caragianis ".V,i, 
Dad's Day next .Saturday promisc-s to be 
the most successful clay of its kiiicl in the 
history of the college. Over 4(K) dads 
have signilicci their inte-iilioii of visiting 
campus, and m.iiis fe-atuics sc lie-dulc-d by 
the committee will make the day out- 
standing in the- soc iai re-curd of the te-rm. 
Keen interest has been evimecl anumg 
the fraternities and sororities in prepa- 
ration for the skits to be presented as 
part of the i-veniiig's entertainment at 
Bowker Au<litorium. 

The College Orchestra of forty pieces, 
under the dire-etion of Levider Kclgar 
S)rton ','j;j, will make its first appc-arance 
of the year during the events of the 
evening with a ]irograin cif light ofiera 
and classical numbers. The Adams 
Dormite)ry will l»e the scene of open 
house for the visiting dads from 10 to 12, 
and the committee invites all men stu- 
dents as well as women escorts to show 
the visitors through the Abbey. The 
trcKip drill by the students in the ad- 
vanced cejursc-s in Military will take place 
at 10.30, and will be followed by a 
mounted jumping exhibition by the 
seior cadets. Dean Machmer will be- the 
s|>eaker at the Dad's Day supper, to l>e 
given at Dra;>c r Hall at i'l.'.'A) p.m. 

The b.isis on which the fraternity and 
sorority skits will be- judged are eight in 
numbe-r, all of wliii h will be coiiside-rt-il 
ol ec|ual value in the Imal award ot points. 
Tlic-y are as follows: 

1. Originality. 

2. .Appropriateness (U\ le-riiis of the 

cMcasion and the- e ollegi-). 

'\. Dire-clion Mhoroughness and intelli- 
gence/. 

1. Team work fsiH-eial cre'dit for larger 
casts I. 

.'». I.xi I lleiie e in |Mrsonal ;irl isl ry. 

<i. liivi-stiliili- 'alliri- .iii'l propc-rlie-s). 

7. Spirit of prese-nl ment. 

8. Popular appi-.d. 

The progr.iiii of the- <lay is givc-n in the 
Campus Caldc-ndar. 

PROFESSOR COLLIER 
ADDRESSES ASSEMBLY 

llearse, (Jlien«>weth, .Southv^ick, and 
.Swarfzwelder Klecled to 
Phi kappa Phi 

Tli.it eelue-atiein nee-els no justifieiition 
outside of its! If and that the ejiw iplinc 
of the higher faculties is tin- true- process 
of education we-rc- the- icie-as eiiibo'lied in 
the address of Professor Tlie-odore Collier 
of Brown I'niversily .it the .Sc hol.irship 
Day asse-mbly VNednesday ,illeriie>oii. 
Dean Machmer, who spoke on the ob- 
ject i\e «»f the- asse-mbly. ■innouiic e-c| the 
ele-ction to Phi Kappa Phi society of 
Arthur L. Be-arse, Howard \\ . ( heno- 
we-th, Lawrence- Scnithwick. .in<l Jeihn C. 
Swartzwelcic r. 

"The Why and How r»f Kelucation" was 

the subject of Professor Ccdiicr's ac|clr<-ss, 

Refuting arguments of those whoc c»iiclenin 

education, he asked the question. "Why 

(tjontlnued on Pafte 3, Column .t) 

Rare Old Book Loaned 
to Library by Harvard 

Dedicated to Queen Llizabeth, a rare 
edition of Sir John Harrington's transla- 
ticjn of 'Orlanelo Fiirio?,io" 'Orlanclo 
Mad), printed in ni;{4, is now it the 
Library. The bcKik is owned by the 
Harvard Colle-ge Library anci is loaned 
to our College library for a shf>rt |K-riod 
at the rerpiest of Professor Patterson of 
the Knglish department. 

"Orlando Fuirwtio" was written by an 
Italian author, Ludovico Arif>sto, in the 
early part of the- sixteenth century cjuring 
(Continued on P«ft« *< Column 5) 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLI.KCLXN, THl RSDAY, NOVFMHER 3, 1932 




/nbassacbuseiW CoUcGian 



Official newsi)at)tr of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

W. Raymond VVahd '33 
Editor •in-Ckitf 



EUGBNS GURALNICK '33 
Managing Editor 



Alfrbda L. Ordway '33 
AsiOciaU Editor 



5TI\TE 



4- 



Stocht>ri^flc 






DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 
Editorial 
W. Raymond Ward '33 
Campus Athletic* 

Raymond Royal '34. EdxU» Theodork M. Leaby '35 

Alfreda L. Ordway '33 Silas Litti.«, Jr. 36 

Ruth D. Campbell '34 
Harribttb M. Jackson '34 

Mary L. Allbn '35 i._„m«. 

David L. Abknbbrg '35 ^ ^V^Jf^tS.. <vx VAU^ 

Elizabeth K. Harrington 35 Alfreda L. Ordway 33. EAUm 

Feature 
Stanly F. Sepbrski '34 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
Ai^€Hiiing Managtr 

Frank Batstone '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. Gurnev '33 

Business Manager 



Butln«a« AMlstanU 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Manager 

W. Lawrence Schenck '34 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 

e vening. ^ . 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amhem Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 

of p osule pr^vide^for in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authori.ed August 20. 19lS. 

* ^ V: ^ _ "^^ ^ D I T O R I A L S ♦ _^*^, . * 

*~'We quotelhe following editorial and reply from the Octolier 22 and October 25 
issues of the Springfield Union. They should be of interest because of the timelmess 
of the subject and the fact that the author of the latter is a prominent member of 
the class of 1932. 



"NOT SO, EXCEPT IN THEORY 

"The fact that straw votes in some of our New England colleges show a larger 
sentiment for Thon.as than for Roosevelt is not surprising in view of the socialistic 
propaganda that has been going on in some of the colleges under the guise of m- 
struction in economics. 

"As a theory socialism has always been attractive and when it comes m economics 
instructors and students are inevitably dealing in theories without first hand 
knowledge of the hard facts of economic experience. To instructors and especially 
the younger ones enthusiasm for the socialistic theory is a self comforting evidence 
of intellectual superiority. 

"The fortunate thing about this tendency in economic departments of colleges 
is that the i istruction doesn't stick well. In a recent article one college professor 
bemoaned the fact that while students might become thoroughly imbued with the 
virtues of socialism in college, they backslid terribly after getting out into the busi- 
ness of life. ., . / ♦ • »i,„ 

"The reason is quite obvious. Theories come easily before encountering the 
realities of life. Students that go out into the world to make a name and a place 
for themselves discover that some things that were taught in college were simply 
not so^ except in theory." 

* ^ * * 



The widely known and popular ".Mi- 
American (iirl" has her counterpart on 
this campus in the person of the "All- 
Fraternity" sophomore co-ed. 
■ — - ss 

The Conn. Aggie "duck" pond will 
soon be refilled and will assume its tra- 
ditional duties of chastizing unheeding 
freshmen. 

A nationally known dancing instructor 
of Boston has created a new and original 
(?) dance, tlie "Co-ed 400." 
ss— - — 

Off and On the Row last Saturday 
night: Q.T.V.— pumpkins with real can- 
dles, big and small, toothed and tooth- 
less, and a souvenir of a past fraternity 
hike. . . Lambda Chi— by a rippling 
stream that did not ripple and no gold 
fish this time. . . Sig Ep— a phantom 
orchestra and a left-handed drum major 
. . . Alpha (iam and Kappa Ep— lights 
out, nobody home. . . Theta Chi- more 
pumpkins and cornstalks plus two jugs 
of (?)... Kappa Sig— poppa of all 
pumpkins, a bull fiddle, and skeleton of 
headless horseman. . . Alpha Sig— black 
and white, and an All-State orchestra. . . 
Phi Sig-a swell band, plenty of flying 
owls, cats and bats. . . Delta Phi- f««- 
tinually on and off the row. 

ss 

APT SIMILIES 

.\s conspicuous as the walk of an 
Outing Club member after a hike. 

As difficult as to stay on a side walk 
between classes. 

As miserable as a freshman with a 
blind date that his fraternity "brothers" 
have forced upon him. 



Hollis IJ. C.oodnow, ex-S'3:i, transferred 
to the University of California at the 
conclusion of his placement raining last 
August. He is located at the University 
Farm in Davis, Calif., where all of the 
degree and non-degree courses in agri- 
culture are conducted. He reports there 
are 45() students enrolled of whom 250 
are in the non-degree courses. 

With his credits from Stockbridge, 
(ioodnow was enabled to register as a 
senior in the two-year course there and 
expects to receive his diploma next June. 
He plans to locate in Broken Bay, New 
South Wales, Australia, after graduation. 




Kolony Klub heUl a successful house 
dance Saturday, October 29. About 
thirty couples attended, ten of whom 
were alumni. Professor and Mrs. Guy 
v. Olatfelter and Instructor and Mrs. 
Alden P. Tuttle were the chaperones. 



The following alumni of A.T.G. re- 
turned to the house Saturday to renew 
old friendships: Daniel Warren, Jr., 
Walter Hanhy, Emil Jaeschke, Tim 
Rabbitt, Joseph Salfrank, Jr., Leo Toko, 
Steve Kovar. John Sheridan, James 
Sullivan, Bud Hulbert, Hank Neely, 
and Maurice Ryan. 



CONDUCT IN THE CAFETERIA 

It is generally assumed, by uppen Liss. 
men at least, that the freshmen consti- 
tute that part of the student body wliich 
lacks culture and social polish. If the 
freshmen are to follow the examples set 
by certain upperdassmen, we shall find 
an ill-mannered group of students on our 
campus. 

Recently, while I was standing in line 
at the Dining Hall, two upperclassmen 
rushed around a corner and burst into 
the line ahead of at least one hundred 
waiting students. A murmur of dis- 
satisfaction broke out, and then oiif of 
the offenders turned around and said, 
"If you've got anything to say, come up 
here and say it." I leave it to your 
imaginations to determine whether or 
not the upperdassmen went to the end 
of the line. They merely continued to 
"distinguish" themselves by chucking 
two co-eds beneath their chins. 

Perhaps I am an optimist, but I believe 
that college men should be of a higher 
caliber. 

Frederick N. A ndrews '.i") 



* 
^ 



©n an^ ofl the "Row 



^ 
^ 



Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Holdsworth and 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Cole were chaperones 
at the Q.T.V. house dance. Phil O'Harris 
from Greenfield provided the music, 
while Prater Hamilton was in charge of 
decorations. 



COLLEGE SOCIALISM 
Editorial Criticism of Trend is Discussed by "Collegiate." 

"To the Editor of The Union 

Sir: Although I have been a sympathetic rea<ler of the Union editorial page 
through the vears 1 have been in high school and college. I find an editorial, "Not So. 
Except in Theory," which is an unsound attempt to explain away the recent student 
trend to Socialism, as evi«lenced in many recent college straw polls. Your argument 
is that Sex iaiism is being propag.'ted under the guise of instruction in economics and 
that when the student graduates into "the realities of life" he will realize that what 
he has learned is true onlv in theory. As one who has actually had several years' 
instruction in economics and who has graduated into the realities of W.V2, I crituize 
yojr editorial as a miserably weak rationalizatioi, trying to persuade yourself and 
others that the opinions of pink college stmlents arc not importa.it, in respect to 

StK-ialism at least. ,, „ , 

In the hrst place, vou falsely assume that, because these student polls show a 
larger sentiment for Thomas than for Roosevelt." something must be wrong with 
our educational svstem. And, of course, with an improved premise, you reach an 
imaginative conclusion, namely, that instructio.i in economics must be mere social- 
istic propaganda. , , , 

Your first assumptioi is false, because it is jusc as likely that the swing to 
Thomas is not indicative of educational weaknesses but rather shows that college 
students have the intellii-ence to recognize political ballyhoo and mush when they 
see them. And vour conclusion is weak naturally. If propaganda is a onesided 
statement of the'truth. it may be just as well that we have socialistic propaganda 
creep into our colleges. Before 1929, it w...s all capitalistic jiropaganda. Since then 
we have fountl that the capitalistic bubble has burst and now, even with all the 
emphasis on the side of capitalism, it is still a feeble side. In this matter of capitalistic 
propaganda, I refer you to Robinson's criticism of the Lusk Report (New \ork 
State Senate) in his book, "The Mind in the Making." 

Insi)iht into Colleftiate Viewpoint 
1 am surprised further, Mr. Editor, with the trite phraseology and soggy argu- 
mentation vou advance in the next paragraph. Had you any real insight into the 
collegiate viewjwint, you would hardly say that the students "are without first- 
hand knowledge of the hard facts of economic experience." It is evident that you 
have no conception of the coin,>etition on many college campuses for a dish washing 
job at $(> a week. Your knowledge of hard facts is incomplete until you sit with a 
fraternitv house committee whoso duty it is to expel members who cannot meet 
their bills because their parents are jobless. You should listen to the stories of 
fellows who have tramped the country rather than be a burden on unemployed fathers. 
Your flimsy rationalizing reaches its height wich. "The fortunate thing is that 
this instructicm doesn't stick." 1 can stn- that you haven't talked with any 19;n or 
19:j2 graduates who were fortunate enough to receive any Socialistic instruction. 
Your viewpoint woiihl be coisiderably broadened if you listened to some of the 
students who recently visited the West \irginia coal mines. College graduates these 
days are not looking at the world through rose colored glasses. They know the truth 
in the jest that "a di.iloma is goo<l for a cup of coffee— if you have a ni kel." Dis- 
illusionment is coming to those who were filled with fanciful id»-as of the grandeur of 
reveling in the battle under the profit motive. Those wlio studied Socialism at ill 
are realizing the elements of truth in Sotialistic doctrine ;.s tlu y tr.inip the streets in 

(Continued on Pa^e 4) 



WILL A SECRETARY EVER GO 
TO HEAVEN? 

If a secretary writes a letter, it is too 
long; if he seids a postal, it is too short; 
if he does not send a notice, he is twj 
lazy. If he attends a committee meeting, 
he is butting in; if he stays away, he is a 
shirker. If he duns the members for dues, 
he is insulting; if he fails to collect the 
dues, he is slipping. If he asks for ser- 
vice, he is inconit>etent ; if he does not, 
he is bull-headed. If he writes complete 
reports, they are too long; if he co.idenses 
them, they are incomplete; if he talks 
on a subject, he is trying to run things; 
if he remains quiet, he has lost interest. 
Ashes to ashes and <lust to dust, if others 
won't do it the secretary must! Narrator 
■ — - ss — - — 

A group of approximately 90 Spring- 
fiekl College students attended a recent 
debate between Springfield and Smith 
Colleges. It was the largest attendance 
ever shown at a Springfield debate and 
it is not certain but that the Smith de- 
bators were the cause for the unasuai 
attendance. 



The Lord Jeff Serenaders were present 
at the Phi Sigma Kappa dance as were 
Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Blundell and Mr. 
and Mrs. R. H. Verbeck. Tuffy Sylvester 
'32 gave his famous Chicken-in-the- 
Subway act. 



Ed Harvey '3.3 was chairman of the 
Kappa Sigma dance. Jerry Fabrey's 
La Piazza Orchestra supplied the rhythm. 
Dr. and Mrs. E. J. RaddifTe and Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold Elder were guests of the 
house. 

Theta Chi's dance was graced by the 
presence of Prof, and Mrs. R. H. Barrett 
and Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Roberts, while 
Bob Noble contributed an orchestra. 

Benton Cummings '3.'? arranged Sigma 
Phi Epsilon's party. Mr. and Mrs. M. 
II. Taube and Mr. and Mrs. G. E. 
Emery acted as chaperones. Turner's 
Falls exported some air charmers i.i the 
form of Togneri's Blue Rhythm Kings. 

Lambda Chi Alpha introduced a wood- 
land scene at its frolic, as a departure 
from the usual pumpkins and fodder. 
l)r: and Mrs. Lindsey and Dr. and Mrs. 
A. E. Cance were guests of the house. 



-ss- 



SUNDAY CHAPEL AUDIENCE 

HEARS PHELPS OF Y.\LE 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

said. He cited the example of how he 
once stood on base in a baseball game, 
and thought so hard about what he 
would do after he caught the ball, that 
he missed a perfectly thrown ball, a! 
because he was thinking about what 
should come next, instead of the task at 
hand. 

"Moreover, a calm mind is a victori- 
ous mind, he continued. Don't exijcct 
too much of people or be upset at things 
that happen, because the moment one 
becomes excited anfl loses his tenii)er, 
his opponent becomes calm. Wherea>, 
if he had remained calm, his opixinent 
would have grown excited. Benjamin 
Franklin, the wisest and calmest man in 
our history, once said, "Be not distudicd 
at trifles or accidents common or un- 
avoidable." Although not many of us 
could obey this precept even for a week, 
Franklin could do it because he had such 
perfect control of his mind. It is possible 
to acquire a calm mind, continued IV 
fessor Phelps, for Helen Wills, who is 
really an excitable person, has done so 
to such a degree that she is known as 
"poker face." 

Today there are people who say that 
the terms "virtue" and "sin" are out- 
worn, but the siH-aker distinguished be- 
tween them as follows: Sin is always 
some form of selfishness, and virtue i? 
always some form of unselfishness. He 
gave examples to show that jealousy is 
the root of evil. And it never hurts the 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Now it's Amherst's turn to worry 
about their goal posts. . . They would 
look nice with red strijjes . . . and .\niherst 
College has no pond. 

■ ss 

Fond relative before the game: "Do 
you play football?" 

Scrub: "Yeah, I'm one of the shock 
troops." 

Fond relative: "A sh(x-k trooper?" 

Scrub: "Uh huh, but the coach hasn't 
lieen shocked enough yet to let me play." 
ss 

Chivalry isn't dead yet. The fellow 
who honks for his girl usually leans over 
to open the door for her.— -Pyre 
— — ss 

Who brought the turkey to the Abbey 
at 5 a.m. Saturday? 

ss 



DAD'S DAY SUPPER 

Those students attending the Dad's 
Day Supper next Saturday, Ncneniber ."), 
and who board regularly at the Dining 
Hall, will take the Student Menu, unless 
tickets are purchased at the registration 
table in Memorial Hall, for the Supper 
Menu. Price of the tickets is 7"k-. 



SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Next Sunday's Philharmonic Sympho- 
ny concert over the radio in the Memorial 
Building at :? p.m. will include: Sixth 
Symphony < Pastorab by Beethoven. En 
Saga by Sibelius, and Roumanian Khap- 
scKly by Enesco. 



POEM OF THE MONTH 



All farmers, and some M.S.C. students, 
know that a hen may sit without setting, 
antl that a setting hen does not sit all 
the time. Both hens and roosters may 
perform the simple act of sitting but it is 
customary for only hens to set. 



ss 

A psy<hnl()^;st at Colgate University- 
showed th.it women's taste is greatly 
influenced by odor. So that is why 
women powder their noses! 
- ■ -ss- 

Four M.S.C. graduates are among the 
194 aviation students at Randolph Field. 
Texas, the place where nun are men and 
women are governors. 



TO MOUNT KAHTADIN 

Slow ly, slow ly. as the rising sun her August warmth 
Threw on the hills, the dense fog thinned, and broke, and 

drew 
Aside, and there before me stood— a picture, sharp. 
Majestic, cokl and wholly wonderful, of cliffs 
Thrust naked, white and keen in one gigantic mass; 
A basin, glacier fashioned, rising skyward from 
The forests damp and dark of balsam firs and spruce. 
In granite faces, slides and ridges, reaching high 
To jagged peaks where one long shining streamer, white. 
Of morning fog, reluctant to be off, still capped 
The topmost pinnacle, and streamed before the wind 
In glory, eastward, rosy in the morning sun. 

.litthor: .Arthur A. Green '.34 
Judge: Professor Patterson 

Manuscripts for the Novemljer contest must be left in 
Mr. Rand's office on or before the l.'ith of the month. 



STATE 21 



AMHERST 6 



Harriers Outrun Sabrinas; 
Jeffs Blank State Booters 



FIRST SOCCER DEFEAT 
IN LAST TEN GAMES 

Amherst abruptly ended the nine-game 
vsiiiaing streak of the Mass. State soi-cer 
team last Thursday on the Alumni Fiehl 
pitch by defeating the Maroon and White 
hooters. 4-9. The Lord Jeflf team pla>ed 
a fine game, using excellent team-work; 
tthili the State machine failed to func- 
tion and most of its playing was done 
indiudiially. 

Uuring the first period, the Sabrina 
team took the lead when Klaer, the Lord 
JelT right inside forward, shoved the 
ball through in a scrimmage in front of 
the State goal. Clifton starred for the 
Sat)rinas during the second jieritMl when 
he scored twice on long boots that Dobbie, 
State goalie, slipping in the mud, failed 
to stop. During the third periotl, David- 
son tallied the Sabrinas' fourth goal with 
a short kick that slipped by Dobbie into 
the net. In the final period, the State 
team rallied and managed to keep the 
ball away from their own goal, but did 
not have sufficient team-work to score 
on the JelT team. 

State's weakness apparently lay in the 
fact that the players failed to cover their 
|)ro[K.r positions and so the team as a 
whole did not click. Kozlowski, Pruyne, 
and Mackimmie made several spectacular 
stops; but were not able as individuals 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 1) 



DKHATKS ARRANGED FOR 

1932-1933 SCHEDULE 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

niijht the team will meet the group repre- 
senting the College of the City of New 
York in New York. Rutgers University 
will be debated in New Brunswick, X. J. 
Siimetiine during the winter term the 
.\meri<an International College and 
Springfield College will be met in Spring- 
field. 

Twenty-six cantlidates are i>ractising 
weekly under student-coach Nathaniel 
h Hill ■;J4. The candidates are: Class 
of l',t.W, Fowler, and Miss .Murphy; 
Class of 19:i4, Dexter, Dunphy, Hill, 
llfxiiien; Class of 19;}.'>, Hubbard, War- 
ner. Williams, and Miss Whitten; Class 
of I'.ttC,, DeWilde. Donnelly, Finkelstein, 
<ilirk. (iold, Haflfer. .Michaelson. Rabino- 
witz, Snow, Zucker. Miss Fillmore, Miss 
Hall, Miss Riggs. Miss SchifT, Miss 
I rhan, and Miss Vichery. 



MURRY BREAKS 

RECORD; SWEET 4TH 

Murray, Caird. and Crawford again 
captured the first three places, as State 
downed the .Amherst harriers, 18 to ^7, 
over the State course last Saturday. 
Sweet, the great .Xmherst niiler, finished 
in fourth place^ just ahead of Da\e 
Crosby; evidently the Lord Jeff runner 
could not stand the fast pace set by Bob 
Murray who broke the course record for 
the fourth time this season. 

Sweet, who was second in the mile in 
the New Englands last spring, took the 
lead up Prexy's Hill; but the State 
sophomore passed him shortly after a.id 
set the pace the rest of the way. On 
East Pleasant Street Murray's lead 
rapidly increased over the tiring S.ibrina; 
while Dave Caird and Red Crawford 
also passed him there. At the finish it 
looked as though another .State runner. 
Crosby, might well have finished ahead 
of Sweet . 

Sixth place went to Hill of .Amherst 
who forced Crosby to let IiMise a beautiful 
sprint to hold his place in the fifth posi- 
tion. Little finished seventh, making five 
of the first seven men State harriers. 
Joe Keil, running for Russ .Snow, who 
is laid up with a sprained ankle, finished 
in twelfth place; while Bob Allen came 
in thirteenth. The summary: 

Won by Murray (S); tied for second, f'aird 
and Crawford (S); fourth, Sweet (A); tifth, 
Cronby (S); sixth. Mill (.\); seventh, Littlr <S); 
eighth, Cha.ie (A); tie<l for ninth, Huppt, Miner 
ami Cobb (A); 12th, Keil (S); 13th, Allen (S); 
Uth, Warren (A). Time— 21m. 8.0s. 



SPORTS CALEND.\R 



ThurHduy, Nov. S 

lull 111. itiriiity Siwrtg; Theta Chi v». IMii 
SiKiiia Kap|)a (tourh football); Alplui 
Siuiiia I'hi vs. Lambda Chi Alpliu 
ttoiich football only) 
Friday. Nov. 4 

Varsity Crosw-Couptry : Mass. State vs. 

St. Stephens at Annand.tle 
Interfratcrnity SiK)rts; K.iium Simna vs. 
y T v.; Alpha llaiiiiiia Klio vs. Delta 
I'hi Alpha 
Suturaay. Nov. 5 

\arsity Football: R.l' 1. ..n Alum i Field 
\a:sity Sotce. : FiUhburti at l-"iuhburi{ 
Monday. Nov. 7 

\'arsity and Freshman Cross-country: New 
Kngland Inten-oUeuiates in Uustun 
Tuesday. Nov. 8 

Interlraternity Sporta: Kuppa Sinma vs. 
Kappa Kpsilon 
Wedneaday, Nov. 9 

Iiitfrlrali-rnity Siwrts: Theta Chi vs. 
SiKiiia I'hi Epsilon 



SUNDAY CHAPEL AUDIENCE 

HEAR PHELPS OF YALE 
(Continued from Pag* 3) 

I)erson of whom you are jealous, it onlv 
hurts yourself. 

It is innM)ssible to have a tran(|uil 
mind when you are thinking of yourself, 
said Professor Phelps. The Christian 
religion shows the way to cheerfulness 
and a tranquil mind. Trantjuillity is an 
inner tjuality in which no one scores 
perfec~tion. Even (jeorge Washington, 
one of the most serene of men, could 
rant and shout at Cabinet meetings. 

Our Lord was the only man who harl 
perfect tramiuillity. conduded Professor 
Phelps. He was entirely without fear of 
consetjuentes, because he knew that 
nothing can hurt a man but himself. To 
one in suffering he said, "<io in peace." 



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TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst, Mass. 



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Hows and Whys of Human Behavior 
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|; Ilbru the -knot Dole |; 



Stop Bush! Ho hum! 



The (juietest and one of the most 
capable (ilayers on the v.irsity soccer 
team is Jimmy Mackimmie. He is well- 
liked by all his teammates and his excel- 
lent all-around play, especially liis strong 
defensive work, has won the admiration 
of his opponents. Jimmy featured for 
State in the Clark and Amherst cont^'sts. 



Believe it or not, Wagner, whom 
.Massachusetts State defeated last year 
77-0, is one of the undefeated and un- 
scored upon football ele\ens in the east. 



Dovie Bush, the State sjieedster is 
leadi-ig the national football storing race 
for the second consecutive week with 
sixteen touchtlowns in six games for a 
total of ninety-six points, (irahaiii, 
Kansas State is second with seventy- 
nine points and Montgomery, Columbia 
quarterback, has scored sixty-two points 
to take third place. Joe .Sheff is in 24th 
|x>sition with thirty-one |>oints. 



PROFES.SOR COLLIER 

ADDRKSSKS ASSEMBLY 
(Continued from Pag* I) 

<lo we have ediicitioii?" "Education is 
not to give success," he stated, "nor to 
develop < itizenship, nor is it to make 
great leaders; but ratlitr education needs 
no policy, no reasons for existence other 
than itst'lf. Cert.iin tonditions such as 
growth, our <le\tlo|)ing iiitt lli^enfe, arirj 
our instiable curiosity recpiire that men 
should be educated." 

Methods of edutation are numerous, 
the speaker said, but thtre is only one 
correct procerlure and that is discipline. 
Self-discipline, s( If lontn.l. an<l jiurposivi 
will, these are the elements of the "How" 
of cflucation. "There is no such thing as 
second hand e(Iu< ati »ii,'' Prtifessor Collier 
stated. "To learn one must do, one must 
work, nothing is acquired by ahsorjilion 
or exposure in education. 

Candidal! s for d(().irtmental honors 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 4) 



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State Overwhelms Amherst 
Rensselaer Next Opponent 



ENGINEERS' ELEVEN 
HAS LOST tOUR GAMES 



The Massiichusetts State C«)llege foot 
ball eleven will meet a newcomer to its 
schedule, Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, on .Munini Kield, November .'>, as 
a feature of Dad's Day. Between the 
halves, the Sophomore- Kresli men, six- 
man rojie pull will be held on the varsity 
tield. Ueiisselaer, after enjoying a very 
successful season last fall, has won but 
out- game this year. In its opening ton- 
test, K.IM. nosed out Williams, Little 
Three Champions, in a hard-fought 
struggle, 7-(». The Engineers were de- 
fe.ited by Clarkstm, a team which lost to 
Middlebury llt-0 in the second game. 
Next, C.C.N.Y. hammeretl out a l.'i-O 
victory over an injured Renns^-I.ier 
eleven. In its fourth contest, R.P.I, 
hehl a powerful Union combine, an eleven 
which .Amherst defeated, l.'{-(», scoreless 
for three periotls but in the final quarter, 
the Engineers' defense cracked and Union 
scored two touchdowns to win, l.'{-(>. 
Last Saturday, the Rensselaer ele\en 
battled to a G-f) tie with St. Mi( hael's 
College of Vermont. The l-Ingineers' 
■scoring te am h as no t functicmed very 
(Continued on Pafle 4, Column 5) ^ i 

COMPARISONS OF PRINCIPLES 
GIVEN BY SP EAKERS 

___^ (Continued from Pafte 1) 

Wilson. During the |Hri<Ml of complete 
Republican control, our natitm has ad- 
vanced to the |>osition of leader in world 
affairs." Mr. Stimson stated that Herbert 
Hoover as a great leader should not be 
put out of power now, of all times. 

C. K. Warne, Professor of h'.conomics 
at Aiulierst C(»llege, presented the .Soi ial 
ist platform for reorganization of the 
^;overnment. He said that both the 
DeiiUKTatic and Republican parties con- 
tained withii. their resiR-itive party plat- 
forms, a few fundamental principles of 
socialism but were unable to proiNrly 
follow those prim iples because of the 
Constitution. "The Constitution as it 
st.inds today," Professor W.irne said, "is 
ohsolete; it was ( reateil for an agric ul 
tiir.il, non-mechanistic civilization, an<l 
ill our complex world it fiiiKlioiis Mr> 
poorly. There are four fundamental 
fa«ts which .Sxialism recognizes. The\ 
are: (1) All nationalistic ideals are 
obsolete; l'2j Machine industry has 
brought a complicated world in which 
are innumerable abuses; CI) No ec onomic 
order can siirvi\e whei the leading vtroiip 
Icmes its function and f.iils to render a 
definite service to that order; ancj (4» 



BUSH, SHEFF and LEARY 
FEATURE STATE WIN 

CiKic h Mel T.iiibe's .M.issic husetts 
State College ftHitb.ill eleven turned aside 
the valiant efforts of a jiowerful .Amherst 
College team and swept through to a Ul-0 
triumph over the Kov.il Purple athletes 
before a crowd of seven thousand on 
.Miimiii I'icdd last Saturday. It was the 
hrst time in the long fifty years' series 
between the two institutions that Massa- 
chu.setts State has defeated the Sabrina 
eleven two consecutive games. It was 
the power ol the punt, a formid.ij^ 
running onslaught and a well-directed, 
well timed passing attack that swept the 
Maroon and White eleven to a slashing 
victory over the Amherst combine with 
its highly tiituriil W.iriiei system. The 
close formation, Roc kne style of fcMitball 
as played by Massjicliusetts State proved 
superior to the open formation, clouble- 
wing back Warner system of Amherst, 
anci the Taubemen smashed through the 
S.ibrina defense for three tout hclowns. 

Mulhall, sophomore tackle, kicked off 
to .Amherst. The S;ibriiia ele\en was un- 
successful in two attempts to gain through 
the Maroon and White line and then 
(Continued on Page 4, Column i) 



Capitalism as a degenerate economic order 
h.is brought about a great dipression 
which has iicH after three years shown 
signs of ending." Sicialism, the H|M-aker 
explained, with a new form of gtivern- 
iiieiit which visii.ili/es the future and 
constructively plans for it; which is 
controlled from Washington by engineers 
ancI not from New Ytirk by bankers; 
aiicl which abolishes war, is the sole 
solution of our difliculties. 

Each spe.iker was :illciwec| thirty-five 
minutes in which to |)reseiit his party's 
ideals. Owing to the lateness of the hour 
at the (lose of the s|Kcciies, no dis- 
c ussicjiis from the fltwr were lieUI. 



FLOWKR snow TO BE 

IIEIJ) NKXT WEEK-END 

(Continued from Puge t) 

'.'{.{, and II. I'aul Stephensen ".Hi, for the 
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Roland K. Cutler '.'{4 I- hiricultiire de|»;irt- 
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department, (*ost.is L. Caragianis '.'{.'< and 
Joseph I". Cotmey S'.'J.J, department of 
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p.iriment of Horticultural Manufactures, 
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partment of (iener.'il Hottii iiltiire. 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1932 



HI C KEY -FREE MAN SUITS 

They save you dollars in the long run and keep you better dressed all along the way. 

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THOMAS F. WALSH 



ton OKI AL MISCELLANEA 
(Continued from Pafta 3) 

a fruitless search (or a job which mislit net them as much as $12 a week. 

So much f<jr specific criticism of your misleachitK, unthounntful e.litorial. Hie 
fundamental principle in the problem as a whole is that you older folks hale to ailmu 
that capitalistic motives threw us all into the present depression and that capitalistic 
principles cannot get us out of it (as Montague Norman, (iovernor of the Hank ol 
England, has recently admitted). Furthermore, you wince when young students 
recoKui/e your follies (such as seekinij a pot of gold at the end of a ticker tape), ami 
start olT on a new trail. That, Mr. Editor, as I see it, is precisely why you wrote the 
editorial in .piestion a half-hearted attempt to ex|)lain what no one except tlie 
students involveil can explain. 

Urged t«) Disrejjard Socialism 
The same purpose might also account for a hook such as Foster and Catching s 
"Profits," a hook in which the authors state that they have no remedy for cynical 
depressions, yet they exhort the student to disregard Socialism and to stand by 
capitalism. A thinking student has a difiuult time to swallow that as he looks for- 
ward to graduating in these times. Me is more inclined to agree with Lawrence- 
Dennis who suggests in his recent hook, "Is Capitalism Doomed?" that classical 
economists set up a capitalistic economy by which businessmen could rationalize 
and could eventually be recognized as respectable people when they sought ad- 
mission to the pearly gates of heaven. 

There has been mutiny among the hordes of capitalists. A few of their generals, 
who are always miles behind the frc^it lines, remain well fed with their unproductive 
incomes; shout "lUiy More," "Prosperity is around the corner" (what a corner!); 
and continue to cut wages. A handful of Marxian followers, who have been ineffectu- 
ally attacking the capitalists for a century, stand victorious because their foes have 
slit their own throats. Your editorial is a fine example of how unpleasant it is to 

admit defeat. 

My suggestion, Mr. Editor, is that instead of trying to explain away the student 
trend to Thomas, you might better hell) to clean up some of the rot of capitalism, so 
that when the student investigates the system he will find a clean back-yard. Just 
80 long as you fail to <lo this, just so long as you spend all your energies trying to 
elucidate upon some iota of wisdom that you may have fine-combed out of the end- 
less political dribblings, just so long will young students become disgusted with your 
vain promises of a renewed prosperity; just so long will there be "a larger sentiment 

for Thomas." 

The baccalaureate challenge used to be to go forth and battle with the hard facts 
of economic experience. Now. there is a challenge to men like you. Mr. Editor, to 
dean up capitalistic politics. Either do that or take it and like it when young men 
go to college, learn scM-ialistic theory, graduate into capitalistic ruin, and begin to 
practice the scnialistic principles they have learned." 

COLLEC.FATE." 



HERBERT HOOVER 

STUDENTS' CHOICE 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

vote. The total number of votes cast 
was 724. 

In a similar ballot conducted Tuesday 
the students of the Stockbridge School 
of Agriculture gave Hoover four times as 
many votes as Roosevelt. Norman 
Thomas came third, while Foster re- 
ceived no votes at all. One student wrote 
Al Smith's name on his ballot. The 
total vote was lt)7, not including the 
one for Al Smith. 

The results tabulated: 

M.S.C. S.S.A. Total 
Hoover 408 120 588 

Koosevelt 123 29 152 

Thomas 117 1« l-^-"' 

Foster 15 15 

Reynolds 1 1 



PROFESSOR COLLIER 

ADDRESSES ASSEMBLY 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 
during the coming year were announced: 
In Agricultural Flconomics, John Harr 
and Parker Sisson; in Philosoi)hy and 
Psychology, Joseph Politella; in Chem- 
istry. Arthur Hearse, Howard Chenoweth, 
and Robert Smith; in Entomology, Dean 
Asquith, Ashley B. (iurney, Benjamin 
Isgur, Eric Karlson, John Swartzwelder. 
In the Dean's scholarship groups, five 
received an average from IK) to M) per 
cent, thirty seven from 85 to 90, and 
eighty five from SO to 85. 



Total 724 107 801 

Names of several persons who are not 
candidates for the presidency of the 
United States were placed on ballots by 
a few Massachusetts State students. 
"Boiipo" Brown '.W led this list, with 
three votes, followed by "Dean" Burns 
with two, and Eddie Cantor with one. 



score. Sheff successfully converted the 
try for the extra point by a i)erfect place- 
ment kick. 

Early in the second quarter, the Jordan- 
men, using double and triple reverses 
drove to the State HO-yard line. After an 
exchange of kicks. Amherst blocked 
Sheff's punt and Leary recovered the 
pigskin for the Maroon and White eleven 
on the 50-yard line. On the next play. 
Sheff dashed around right end and fought 
his way to the Siibrina 15-yard line. 



FIRST SOCCER DEFEAT 

IN LAST TEN GAMES 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

to break up the .\mherst attack. The 
Sabrinas were up on their toes all the 
time an<l. though co-oper.iting well, were 
also able to shine individually. Fort, 
the Lord Jeff goalie, made several goo<l 
stops; while Creenough. tcx), was out- 
standing on the defensive for the visitors. 

The summary: 

Mass. State 

g, Doliliii'. lloiiran 

rl). lldil-idon 

111. (Dwinu 

rli. Shmnaii. T.ill)')t 

„. . „ .h. I'ruyiK-. (lark 

kI::.> \ir ' nr. R"i..rt tmu hus^wj^h. 

i).iviii-<>n. cf 
t lilliMi. lit 



Amiierst 

Fort. K 
luistman. rl) 
(;rccnoiinti. ll> 
Horlon, rli 
liiilKiii?'. il> 



(.f. Ja< k^^oii 
lif. Kozlowski. Howl.r 
,,,. , , lot. BcTiistiin. »iilt-r 

■^'L'"- x.nhPrm 4 \i SO. (1. C.oal^* -Clifton 2. 

20-minulc (luurters. 



BUSH, SHEFF AND LEARY 

FEATURE TAUBEMEN WIN 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 

punted to Joe Sheff. who downed the 
ball on the Amherst 45 yard line. After 
an exchange of punts. State hammered 
its way to the Andierst 10-yard line where 
it lost the ball on downs. Cadigan bo«rted 
the ball on the first play to Bush, who 
snared the leather on the Amherst 40- 
yard line and advanced to the :{5 yard 
line. Bush hurled a long pass to Sheff 
but the State halfback dropped the ball 
in the clear. State surrendered the ball 
to the Rcjyal I'urple eleven and then 
Cadigan's kirk was partially blocked and 
Sheff recovered tm the Amherst 29-yard 
line. On the next play, Sheff hurled a 
beautiful ten-yard pass to Bush, who 
raced twenty yards for the first State 



FISHER'S 

CORDUROY 
SUITS 

Wine, Oeen, Brown. Navy 

In two styles 
Sizes 14 to 20 



$3.95 



Amherst was penalized to its one-yard 
line for unnecessiiry roughness. Bush 
then dove thrcjugh tackle for the second 
State score and Sheff again coinerted 
his try for the extra jioint. The half 
ended. State 14. .\mherst 0. 

Amherst began the third (ptarter with 
renewed vigor and displayed a powerful 
offense in its drive down the field for the 
only Sabrina touchdown. After making 
five first downs for sixty-five yards, Kehoe 
smashed through the Maroon and White 
line for the score. Cadigan filled to 
convert the extra |)oint. 

In the final quarter, the Taubemen's 
Rockne style of ffXJtball again functioned 
smoothly and State chalked up another 
six points. Bush ttxjk the ball on the 
State 40 yard line and skirted the Am- 
herst left end for a spectacular 40 yard 
gain, placing the ball on the S;d)rina 20- 
yard line. Bush then hurled a ten yard 
pass successfully to Captain Leary, the 
State center, who was downed on the 
.\mherst ten yard line. Thrusts by Sheff 
and Bush placed the ball on the two-yard 
line a.id Bill Frigard {dunged over for 
the final touchdow >. Sheff kicked his 
third consecutive extra ix)int. 

In Massachusetts' overwhelming vic- 
tory over its town rival. .Andierst, the 
sensational tackling of Captain Leary 
and Binka Smith was an inqKirtant 
feature. Bush. Sheff and Frigard did 
some sens;itional ball -carrying in the 
Maroon and White backfield with Sheff. 
althinigh he did not score a touchdown, 
bearing the brunt of the plunging attack. 
The line-ups: 



ENGINEERS ELEVEN 

HAS LOST THREE CWIKS 
(Continued from Pa)te 3) 

smoothly this season and R.P.I, ),aj 
scored but 13 points to 57 for its oijpo- 
nents in five games. Massarlu.M tts 
State, in six games has rolled u\> the 
total of 154 points to 32 for its oj)p<)ii, rus. 
However, the New York team ha> Ikh 
handicapped by injuries the entire Mason 
and will enter into the State fray in full 
strength for the first time this si.i^on. 
The Engineers stellar halfback. Snk, a 
West Springfield boy, is expected tu luar 
the brunt of the plunging attack. 

In spite of Rensselaer's unim])rc>>i\e 
record and Massachusetts brilliant show- 
ing against Amherst, Coach Mel 'lauk 
of the Mar(X)n and White eleven has 
drilled his players hard this week in 
preparatio.i for the contest. 




Mass. State 

Mountain. I>> 
Sifvcrs. ( liizowslci. It 
1.1-avitt. Burke. Ik 
I,<"arv, (Iri^woUi. c 



Amherst 

Ic, Most'-, Wlicclcr 

It, i'L-iiiburK 

Ig. Tiiompson, Morse 

c, KiiKlish 



RARE OLD BOOK LOANED 

TO LIBRARY BY HARVARD 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

the Renaissance. The book was a con- 
tinuation of another Italian work. 'Or- 
lando Innamurato." In 1591, Sir John 
Harrington, an English writer, translated 
this work and dedicated it to Oueen 
Eliziibeth. Evidently the book was 
appreciated, for it was revised and printed 
again in 1034. The book at the l.ihrary 
now was printed at this time. 

The title page is inscribed as follows: 
"Orlando Furiosio in English heroic 
verse by Sir John Harrington of Bathe, 
knight . . . printed in London hy G, 
Miller for J. Parker." The date is ir..U 

Although nearly three hundred years 
ol<l. the pages are in excellent ccjiidition; 
the binding of the book is recent. Out of 
the four hundred and four pages com- 
prising the translation, only a few are 
iiii>>iiig. Ilaniiigtoii in this particubr 
edition added four books of epigrams 
which he dedicated as follows to: "Ki>:ht 
Honorable (ieorge, Duke of Buckingham" 
There are a great many excellent illus- 
trations or engravings in the forty-six 
books or cantos. 

The book is from the Ticknor-Uante 
collection and was donated by the heirs 
of fiC'orge Ticknor. a professor in H.u- 
vard from 1SI7 to 18;{5. to the llarvanl 
College Library. 



Sil>soii, .Nietupski, Bickford. fK rK, SkiU-s. Harlow 

Mulhall, CuiiiminKs, rt rt. Potter 

Smith, Kvan. re re. D»-Hevoise. Curtis 

I{i«.-lo\v. U)iko. <\h fll>. Warner, ("ireenc 

Mart. Wliitf. Ih!) llil>. Culiuan. Murphy 

Itusli. rhh rhl>. Homer, llucy 

l-'iiu.ird. I'l) f). Lyman, Kchw 



M.S.C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

"Let Dave do it" 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 
Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



Typiiiii 

First Cla£s Work Uow Rates 

MARICN BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M <>PP- "I'l" ^'ft" """^e 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



Everything in Hardware 

and Radio Equipment 

— PHlLCO= 



= AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



THURS. 
NOV. 

3 

FRl. 

NOV. 

4 

SAT. 
NOV. 

5 
MON. 

NOV. 
7 

TUES. 
NOV. 

8 

WED. 

THUR. 

NOV. 

9-10 



•'BLESSED EVENT" 

[ with 

, Lee TracN - Mary Brian 

I TilTaiu Th.iyer's 

' "13 WOMEN" 

with 
Irene Dunne - Rii'. Corte; 
I Mvrna I.on-JMI I'smond 



Every place the word "success" cxcurs 
in the Bible four in all it is precidid 
by the word "goo<l." 



JO.W BKNNRTT 

in 

"WILD GIRL" 

kiili.ird Bartlulnuss 



"C.VBIN IN COTTON" 

with 

Dorothy Jordan [ 

Bctte Davis 

Laurel and Hardy - in 

"PACK UP 

YOUR TROUBLES" 

.\ solid hour of joy 

NORMA SllK.XRKR - in 
"SMILIN THRU" 

with ■ Leslie Howard 
Fredric March 



GORDON SILK AND WOOL HOSIKRV 

Full Fashioned — New Shades 

at .")()€ and $1.00 pair 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



College Drug Store 

\V. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST. - - MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

32 MAIN ST. (Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Colic giaU' Sportwear for Men and Women 

Riding Habits, Boots, Miking and Sport Jacket 

We give free carfare with purchases of So. 00 or up 



SANG TtTTSir. HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REI'AIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE I'RICES 

Our Laundry First Class , „ . . 

Our Policy Guarantied 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 




type:\vriters 

for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



THE CANDY KITCHEN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 



SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 



INCORPORATED 



4- 

4- 
4- 

4- 



♦ 



A CURRENT EVENT IN «A, 
THE COLLEGIAN T 



j'reHltlent Baker reprevent* 
ihiH coUeUe for ihe hrbt i^ 
time on Friday. *V* 



* 




I. A. C. Llbrarr. 



/llbaeeacbueiHiCollcaian 



^ OL T.STANOINd EVENT 

T" OK 1MK WKKK 

A, The KUCceN. of the Dad'i 

JT l*ny eiiUTlalnnu'nt well de- 

V* »»TM-ii fir»l |»lace thU wet-k. 



Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1932 



Number 7 



Visiting Parents Enjoy 

Successful Dad's Day 



Wi-.ither Falls to Mar Events of 
Interest Prepared for Guests 

Despite threatening clouds and rain- 
filliil winds, the ardor of visiting parents 
oil Dad's Day, held last Saturday, Nov. 
5. vvus in no wise daniiH'iied as student 
siKi^ and daughters guided the guests 
tliiough a day of many and varie<l 
iMiits. Every phase of campus life, 
academic, social, athletic, dramatic, — 
all were eagerly explored by the 4(X) dads 
\\\\<i registered. The undoubted success 
ol tlie day was due to the efforts of the 
saidint committee, which took complete 
tli.iri-e of the reception under Committee 
Chairman Costas Caragianis ".i.i. 

Ri>;istration was in effect in the .M 
Htiilding from 8.:}0 a.m. to 2 p.m., and 
vi,iting in all the college departments 
t,»k i)lace from '.♦ to 1U..50. Classroom 
inspection was followed by an exhibition 
(Continued on P»f 4, Column I) 

CAMPUS VISITORS SEE 
FRATERNITY SKITS 

Sift Ep Wins First Place Award 



.\ capacity audience witnessed the 
closing of a very successful and well- 
attended Dad's Day last Saturday eve- 
ninK when the various fraternities and 
sororities suj)plemented by the college 
oniiestra presented seven-minute skits. 
Urisinality and careful preparation were 
eviiKed in all the acts the subjects of 
whith ranged from seleetions from the 
"Student Prince" to a mock Senate 
meeting. 

.\tter commending the students for 

their work in the entertainment, the 

judnes. Professors Rand anil Sears and 

Mr. Williams annimnced their unanimous 

derisions which gave first place to Sigma 

I'iii Kpsilon for its presentation of "The 

NiKlitinare," second to Kappa Sigma for 

•The Mirage," third to Lambda (hi 

\!|.li I for 'Student Princes." and fourth 

to Iheta Chi for "guiet Hours." Phi 

Zet a was voted first among the sororities. 

riu- Night Mare" written and di- 

recteil by (ieorge .Alilrieh was an alter. 

(Continued on Pafte 3, Column !n 



Dr. Gilkey Addresses 
Student Body at Chapel 

i>'>es your life belong to you?" was 
file question jMJsed by Dr. (jilkey of the 
■^'iiith Congregational Church of .Spring- 
!i' 'd at Sunday Chapel, Nov. (». Stress- 
'■'< I lie dependence of America upon her 
'lle;.;(s and her right to expect the best 
from college youth, Dr. C.ilkey intro- 
diin.l his subject with an account of the 
life .mi dci-ds of the late Ivar Kreuger. 

> 1- Kreuger's life his own?" "In- 

''"•r-. who had given him their life 

ivin,;s, teachers who la\ished upon liini 

■ v dth of technical knowle<lge, business 

'' 'i vho built up our complicated system 

' ■ ' I'lual and international finance, his 

. who lived to see him exposed, all 

ad a valid claim upon the life of 

'^ r," said Dr. C.ilkey. 

•ring the popular question of 

students, "Have 1 a right to live 

;is 1 want to?" Dr. Gilkey slid, 

life does not belong to you but 

I>arents." 

'' iring that Amerif.i expects fine 

'^' ••' Tough work in our job, whatever 

" and that we must be able to 

liind that product. Dr. Gilkey 

that Tuesday, election day. 

ik a new era in the progress of 

'■ The dependence of .\merica in 

' • :a 40 years is upon a college group, 

' '-tf rtmned to give to .-Xmerira a combin- 

■»t«r, of mtelligence and good citizenship. 

A string quartet composed of Edgar 

^<on. Edward Harvey. Ralph Henry, 

frank Batstone provided special 



Many Fine Features on 

Social Union Program 

High Type of Entertainment Offered 
f*ir Season of l*ii2-ii 

During the li»:J2-19.1.{ season, eight 
Social I'nion entertainments will be 
presented in Howker .\udilorium acconl- 
ing to -Set retary Robert ll.iwley. In- 
cluded in this season's list of entertainers 
are: Savelli Walevitch, the Jitney Pia\ 
ers, the Women's Little Symphoin, the 
Dartmouth Musical Clubs, and Edith \V. 
Matthison. 

.Savelli Walevilch will open the current 
Social Cnion season on November 17 
when he will present Russian I'olk songs 
and (iypsy ballads. The State College 
Revue scheduled for Friday, Decendur 1.', 
will be the second performance. 

".Murder in the Re<l Harn" is the title 
of a l)lay to be presented by the Jltne\ 
Players as the third olTering of the 
season. The Jitney Players are con- 
sidered as one of the best itinerant 
theatres of to<lay. They will give their 
program on Friday evening, Januar>' (i. 

On .'junday afternoon, January lo, the 
\V(mien's Little Symphony will give a 
musical concert. This group is composed 
of prominent Boston musicians and is 
conilu<ted b\- Nicolas Slonimski. 

Edith Wynne Matthison (Mrs. Charles 
Kenned\ I will gi\e readings ami inter- 
pretations of Shakespeare's plays on 
Friday evening, January 27. Miss Mat- 
thison is a former Shakespearean actress 
of note and in her perform.mce will 
render the l)alc<jny siene from Romeo 
and Juliet, and also selections from 
Twelfth Night. Hamlet, -As You Like It. 
an<l Henry MIL 

The Dartmouth College Musical Clubs 
composed of the Glee Club, the Instru- 
mental Club. Speci.ility .\ct>., and the 
(Continued on Pafte 2, Column !>) 

243 BOYS AND GIRLS 
IN JUDGING CONTEST 

Agricultural Departments Sponsor 
Event 

Two hundreil and tiiirty-six boys and 
girls took part in the annual judging 
contests held last Friday and .Sijtur<lay 
under the super\ision of the staffs of 
the various departments of the college. 
The contests were held in the judging of 
fruit, milk, poultrv. livest<Kk, and vege- 
tables. 

First prizes were won by the following 
teams: The FLssex County .■\gri< ultur.il 
Scho<d in milk judging: the North High 
SchiKd of Won ester in fruit judging; 
Norfolk County Agricultural Sthwd in 
vegetables: .Xgawam High S<hool in 
livestock; and tlie Hampshire County 
4-H boys in [x^ultry. 

In each of the five contests the wincing 
teams were presented with loving cups 
.ind high scoring individuals received 
medals. 



A- 

til. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 

ELECT OFFICERS 

At a recent meeting of the grarluate 
students Ralph F. Nickersf)n was elected 
president and John Clague. secretary of 
their group. The bo<ly plans to meet 
once a month and to have a speaker and 
then to hold a dis<;ussion. Afterwards 
there will be an entertainment. The first 
meeting was held on November H at T.'.H) 
in the Memorial Building with Professor 
Waugh as speaker. Two committees 
have been chosen to ha\e charge of the 
meetings. They are as follows: Program 
-Albert H. Gower. Miriam Morse, 
Constantine Gilgut. Lauri S. Ronka. and 
Laurence fllliott; Social Byron Red- 
mon. J. Elizabeth Donley, anfl Herbert 
D. Darling. 



PRESIDENT BAKER TO 
VISIT AMHERST FRIDAY 

Will .\ttend lnau>iuration of President 
Kinft of .\mherst College 

President Hugh P. b.iker will repre- 
sent Massiichusetts State College at the 
in.iuguration of Stanlex King as elexenth 
president of .\mherst College on l'rid,i> , 
November 1 1. 

.■\s represi'ntati\'e of the college, Presi- 
dent B.iker will have .ippeared for the 
first time in his capacity as eleventh 
president of the College, rnfortim.itely 
becausi- of tluties in Syr.icuse, President 
Baker's visit in Amher>t will be very 
short; he will leave immediately after 
the in, Uigur. ilion. 

President B.ikcr will be one of the 
presidents and heads of I'H colleges and 
universities at the inaiigur.ilion of Piesi- 
dei\t King. <iovern(>r Joseph 1-.1> and 
Former President Calvin Coolidge will 
attend the exercises during l"rida> and 
Saturday «>f the inauguration weekend. 

The exercises will tommence with the 
academic jircxession from Con\erse 
Memorial Library to College Hall at 10 
o'cl(Kk Friday morning. At KUO, in 
College Hall, G. A. Plimpton will pre- 
sent Dr. King with the insigni.i nf the 
(Continued on P«a« 2. Column 5) 

Freshman Class Mental 
Test Results Completed 

Frosh "Smarter" Than Sophs 

Results of the freshman mental tests 
which have been announced by Dr. H. 
N. (.lick, show that in the Psy» hcdogii al 
test this year the average was l'.t7. in 
c(inii)arison with th" iveraije lA I'.fJ <il 
the class of VXi'> giv«M in W>\. Returns 
from other colleges concerning this 
Psychol«)gical test have not been re- 
ceived yet, so it is im|)ossible to deter- 
mine the standing of Massiichuwtts 
State freshmen in relation to those of 
other colleges. 

In jilace of the .Xrniy-Alpha test of last 
year. Dr. Click's own test was given this 
fall, so in this case- no comparison can be 
made with previous years. The third 
test given last year has been so greatly 
revised that it is impossible to dr.iw any 
( omp.irisons between the new and old 
forms. 

FIRST COMMUNITY CONCERT 

.Approxim.iteh eight hundred peojilf 
attended the jH-rformance last Thursday 
evening of the- Bros.i String (Juartet of 
London. This cone crt marked the open- 
ing of the .Amherst Community Concert 
series. 

The group, consisting of Ant<mio Brosa, 
first violin; David Wise, second violin; 
Leonard Reubens, viola; l.ivio Mannii<< i. 
'cello, gave a very brilliant and skillful 
rendition of three quartets, namely: 

Oiiartii in D minor (IJeatfi and tlie Maidc-n) 

.Mlcuro S, Hubert 

AmfantP ron moto 

SIhtzo allfgrii rnolto 

I'rnslo 
OuarU't in A minor, f)put ."j1. No. 2 linihms 

.Mli'Sro non tropim 

Andante inorlcrato 

'Jiia^i niiniiptlo. tnodcrato 

Fiiialf. allcKro non assai 
QuartPt in I) major, No. 2 Rorodin 

Allegro moderato 

Slierzo, allegro 

Notlurno. andante 

Finale, amlantc-vivac: 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



.Vh ffering, and dralh 
Inhabit hfre, and t)fath' s ir.vn brother Sleep; 
And the mind', enl luU and deadly War 
Lie al Ihe threshold. . . 

I'ernil — Aeneid 



Thurnday, Nov. 10 

7.:50 CoUeKian Competition 
World State NiKht 
Friday. Nov. 11 

Holi>lay. Arini''lire Day . , , 

S.S,\. Kofjthall. Essex County Agricultural 
School, here 

Saturday, Nov. 12 

2.0fJ i>.n). X'ariity Football, ("oast Ouard 

Academy at Alumni Field 
8-11 p.m. Phi Zeta Dance, Memorial Hall 

Sunday. Nov. li 

.'J.(XI p m. I'hilharmonic Concert in 
Memorial Hall 

Monday, Nov. 14 

H.(X) p.m. (jle«' Club, Memorial Hall 

Tuenday, Nov. IS 

S 110 p.m. ( honin. Memorial Hall 

Wednesday, Nov. 1* ^ ^ , ^, , , . . 

S.nO t).m. On heilra Rehearsal. StoikbridKe 



Hort. Show Opens Friday 
In Physical Education Cage 



Athletic Board Makes 
Annual Financial Report 

For Year Enilina June .*0, 1«M2 

The .Athletics Board makes the follow- 
ing financial report for the year ending 
JuneXO. \\y.V2: 

i:.\ri:Ni)iTrRi:s 

Kootb.ill .*i,4i'.t.r..s 

ScKcer 4(»7.;{4 

Track l,41'.i.r.(l 

B.iskitball L.S'.l'l.LMt 

Hockey S10.72 

Baseb.ill 1,<)(I.''>.(N) 

(■eiieral I'xpenditiires (wot |»<t- 
taiiiing to ,iiiy one s|M)rt) 

Lc|uipment, supplies, etc. (),;fKS.(>ri 

Coaches' Travel 'SOIA) 

Outing Club 12.2.") 

Total expenditures, 

C.eneral Funds $\),2H:iJ,2 

Total Kxpenditures for all 

purposes $17,l4r).;{2 

RKCKIITS 

Balance on hand July 1, I'.f.U i|f2,r.(i7.K7 
Stiidciit Tax l.''»,(»2.''..(H) 

Season Tickets ."WiLriO 

Total Receipts $l8,2r>4.r}7 

Balanc c on hand July 1, 1!>;}2 $1,I(K>..W 

The above statement is a brief siini- 
iii.iry of the dc-tailed financ iai report whic h 
i'l cm (lie , It Ihe Alhhtic ( Ulic c- and .it I he 
President's Oftice. 

,\ny perscin interest'-d in the detailed 
.iniiual reports may have access to (hem 
by making recjuest at the Athletic Office 
in the Physical Kciucation Building. 

STUDENT CHEST DRIVE 
OPENS NEXT WEDNESDAY 

Red Cross and L'nemploynieiit 
Heneflt 

\V'ednes<lay night. November Kl, at 
7 p.m. will usher in the third annual 
Student Chest l)ri\c' when ajiproxi 
iiiatc-l\ ;{.") solicitors will begin canvassing. 
The proceeds of the drive will be divided 
between the- Ked Cross anci the .Amherst 
rnemployment Relief Fund. Last year 
the canvass netted a total of $2.')0 part 
of which went to pay the men who 
worked on the new sidewalk extending 
from the- I'hysics building (ci the Last 
Ex(M'riment station. 

In \ iew of the fact lh,«t the- nee-d <>( 
relief is mill li greater this \iar than e\«r 
bi-fore. it is hoped that the students of 
M.S.C. will make as generous ,i ccmtri- 
biitifjii as in pre\ ious years. 

The drive is in charge of a commit t«"e 
of seven hc-aded by Malcolm J. Fowler 
',■{.'{ as chairman. The other membc-rs of 
the group are I'age L. liiland '.'{4, \ incent 
C. (iilliert ';{4. Josephine F. Fisher •.{4, 
Charlotte 1. Miller '.{.i, Marjorie C. Cary 
':{;{, Kli/abeth K. Ilarringtc»n '.Jo. 

The funel will be- administered Hy a 
faculty committee formed for the pur|K>se. 

PROFESSOR .SEARS TALKS 

TO OUTINC CLUB 

Professor Fred C. Sears of the Pomolo- 
gy flepartment gave an interesting talk 
on the f)eople, customs, and life in 
Labrador, to the Outing Club last 
Tuesday in French Hall. 

Professfir S<"ars has sfKint several years 
in Labrador as an aid to Sir Wilfred 
tirenfel in his work among the |)eople 
there. Me des<ribef| their life in det.iil. 
The Professor said, "It is riangerous to 
go out of dofjrs at night owing to the 
ferocity of drjgs. If one stumbles to the 
grounfi. dfigs are upon him immediately. 
Their hunger drives them to devour any- 
one who seems rlefenseh-ss. 

The sfile industry is fishing and the 
native diet consists of fish and honey." 



Many Cmisual Features .Should Pro- 
duce Oulstandintt Exiiibition 

.All divisions of the department of 
llortic lilt lire are joining in the most out- 
standing I lortic iiltur.il Show ever staged 
by the colh-go, opening in the c.ige of the 
Physic ,il Lducation biiililing at •'( p.m., 
Noveiiiber 11. Then- will be a short 
opening cerenioin on Iriday in which 
Director Rnl.ind II. N'erbee k will repre- 
sent boili the college administ rat ion and 
the StcM-kbridge SduKil, and Professor 
Kalph .A. \an Meter will speak for the 
cle|iartmciit of Horticulture. Open hours 
for the show will be Friday from .'I p.m. 
to 10 p.m., .Siiiurday, November 12 from 
'.•a.m. to 1(1 p.m., and Sunday, November 
b'i from 12 III. to S p.m. 

ICxhibits and comiK'titions by Massa- 
clius«-tts .Stale- Colh-ge, Smith ;inc| Mt. 
Ilolyoke eolli-g«-s, the llolyoke anti 
Northampton Florists' and (iardeners* 
Club, and several conimere iaI firms not 
only from M.issichusetts but from Maine 
,111(1 CcMinc-c tic lit as well will make an 
interesting and educational show which 
also promises to be strikingly beautiful. 

Chrysaiithemuiiis will dominate the 
flower sections of the show as they 
ap|M-ar not only in colh-ge and garden 
club exhibits and competitions but also 
in the formal garden arranged as a 
central feature for the slmw by students 
of Landscape Architecture. Evergreens, 
roses, ami c.irnalions will also In- promi- 
nent in the exhibits. Other garden ar- 
r.iiiKeiii(-nts ini Inch- » ilesi-rt «c-fne, a 
natural hillside g.irchn, and entries in a 
ccini|>elilion class of garden arrangements 
each to co\«-r 2<H( sc|iiare- feet of space. 

Ceiin|M titi'.c- llor.tl i-xhibils of all kinds 
will be arranged by students in the four 
\c'ar ami two yt-ar classc-s. Tliesi- exhibits 
will include- table deioralions, J.ipanese 
dish gareleiis, vases, baskets, l>oiic|iii-ts, 
corsiiges, and other floral arrangements. 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 2) 

BOSTON ALUMNI PLAN 
SMOKER ON NOV. 18 



.Students Invited to Attend 

Stud<-rits going to Boston November 18 
for the Tufts fiMitball game will have an 
opportunity to allc-nd ;i pre game cele- 
br.itioii arr.inged by the Bostc)ii Aliimni 
Club. A smoker will be held at *"i..'{(l p.m. 
in lio|ikins. Inc., at 221-22,') Washington 
Street. < iCKMl fexnl, gcKxl s|H'akers, anti 
gcjcMl entertainment are promised. Harry 
.N'issen '14 will be- master cif ccrenieinies. 
I hc-ri' will be ,1 real fooili,ill atmosphere 
as the Boston Alumni grc»u|» have ar- 
ranged a banner program eif spc-akers and 
entert,'iinmc-nt. Primipal speakers will 
be Curry Hicks, lieael of Mass. .State's 
Physical Kdueatirm department; .Mel 
Taube, eoach of two suctessful grid 
teams; Lniory Crayson. a former cap- 
tain ;ind now assistant cc>acli; iial 
Pcxjie, le.idcr of the- l!t20 c-h-ven, and 
many other carri«-rs of the .M.ir'wen jtig- 
skin. As practically all of the grid cap- 
tains sincf '',)2 will be- presc-nt. it will be 
certain th;it when the time coinc-s to 
retell the- old battles with Harvard, 
Tufts, Dartmouth, and .Springfield, a 
gfMKi job will be done. 

-All undergraduates and friends of the 
Alumni are invited. The price of ad- 
mission will be !*1 .<K). 

ROI.STER DOLSIER TRYOIJTS 

Tryouts for the winter jilay to l)e 
given by the- Roister Doistirs will be 
held next \Veclnes<lay evening at eight 
o'clock at the .Memorial Building. Any 
student in college is eligible- to try out 
for p,irts. .All tlK)se feeling that they 
have s<mie dramatic- ability are urged to 
be preH«'nt at the tryouts. Last year, 
s<'veral fn-shme-n were- cist in the winter 
play. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGL\N, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1W2 



m 



I 







5r/\ TE 



/nbaeeacbuseW^ CoUegian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusitts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

W. Raymond Wakd '.'J3 

Editiir-in-Chief 



EUCBNB GUKALNICK '33 
Managing Editor 



Alfrbda L. Ordway *33 
AssociaU Editor 



DEl'ARTMENTAL EDITORS 
Editorial 
VV. Raymond Ward '33 
Campus Athlertc* 

Raymond Royal '34. Editur Theodore M. Lbary '35 

Alfrbda L. Ordway '33 Silas Littlb. Jr. m 

Ruth D. Campbell '34 
Harribttb M. Jackson '34 
Mary L. Allbn '35 
David L. Arenbbkg '35 
Elizaiibtu K. Harrini-ton '35 



Feature 

Stanly F. Sbpbrski '34 



Exchanges 
Alfrbda L. Ordway '33. EdU» 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
Adt4rtising Manager 

Frank Batstonb '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. Gurney '33 
Business Manager 




Stochbri^oc 



^ 
^ 



^ 



"Woticcs 






Ode! seats, odd numbers, and even 
seats, even numbers, and nothing can be 
done about it. 



-SSr- 



Buslnesa AMlatanta 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Manager 

W. Lawrbncb Schbnck '34 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 



evening. 



Entered as eecond-class matter at the Amherst Post Ofnce. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of postage provi ded for in Section UKi. Act of October. 1917. authorUed August 20. 1913. 

^ ^ EDITORIALS ^ 4^ ^ 

DADS DAY 

We are haiipy to have the opportunity to publish the following letter, which was 
sent to Costas Caragianis, Chairman of the Dad's Day Committee, by the Secretary 
of the Cidlcge: 

"Dear Mr. Caragianis: 

The Pre.si<ifnt's Cabinet, which as you may know represents the faculty 
in college administration, voted at its meeting totlay to send a note of coni- 
mendation to you and your rommittee for the very efficient way in which 
you organized and maiianL-d the Dad's Day program. I can say for this 
coininittoe an.l for myself that we are highly gratified, not only because of 
the large number of dads who visited the College and the goo<l program 
which was arranged for them, but also because of the fine example of stu- 
dent initiative and ability wiiich your committee has demonstratetl in 
handling this affair. Voii have done a good service for the College." 
One who has not had experience in i>lanning and organizing affairs like Dad's 
Day can hardly begin to realize how much painstaking labor Caragianis and his 
o.iniiiittee must ha%e put in to make the day a success. After important problems 
have been met and solved there is always an innncnse amount of (L-tail which must 
be taken care of if the alTair is to run smoothly. Not luck, noc backing, but much 
hard work and patience ma<le Dad's Day a success. We join with the administration 
in thanking Caragianis and his committee for the service they have done for the 
college. 

CHAPEL ACJAIN 

Our editorial two weeks ago on ai^plause in chapel seems to have been taken .i 
number of <!ifferent ways. A gmxlly number of our fellow students apparently took 
it literally. Kither they were not bright enougii to see the jmint, or they had such a 
poor opinion of our judgment and giKnl taste that they jumped to a conclusion with- 
out reading it can-fully. . , , . 

The result is that by some we l.a\e been ( riticized severely for being sacreligious 
and utterly lacking ir g(K)d taste, while others merely applauded more heartily at the 
next opportunity, which happened to be Sunday Chapel, and numerous upperciass- 
men have beseechcd us to do sinuething about it. 

We cannot think of anything more stupid, senseless, and valgar than applause 
at a religious service. Nothing could show more clearly an utter lack of any appreci- 
ation at all for the high values involved; nothing could be much more insulting to a 
guest. If State College students c.mnot listen to a sermon or to sacred music without 
applauding, then we had better do away with religious services here and have Punch 
and Ju.lv shows instea.l. (Note: This is to be taken literally on Sunday. Monday, 
and Fridav mornings. I'se full strength; do not dilute.) 

One fi-eshinan took the trouble to write us a very caustic letter in criticism of 
the editorial in cjuestion, but he did not give us his n^-me. Let us again remind you 
that the Collfi^ian does not publish any communications or contributions unless the 
editor knows the authors name, even though the name is not to be published. 



Last words of a soph after an English 
exam. "My only regret is that I have 
only one life to give to my English prof." 
• — ■ — ss — — 

Little known occupations: The delicate 
process of preparing negatives of Index 
photographs to please the imaginations 
of the Juniors. Warts, pimples, scars and 
wrinkles are duly erased and beautifying 
lines added here and there. But what is 
the reward of this artist who wastes his 
genius on this unknown and thankless 
task? If the photo looks like the person 
photographed, he kicks because it looks 
too much like him, and if the pictures do 
not look like him, he kicks because they 
do not. It is a pity that all are not Gables 
or (iarbos. 

Alas for freshman rules. A lumbering 
ox of a freshman, when told by the 
Senate to wear a strip of orange paper 
arountl his head, offered to take on any 
of the Senate members. He got away 
with it, too. 

A member of the class of '.•54 was en- 
v;rossed in writing a letter. Suddenly he 
looked ui) with an agonized expression 
on his face and asked his roommate, ''Do 
you spell sweetness with two e's?" 
Vouzza. and dear of this species is spelt, 
dear. 

The burning question in a fraternity is 
not whether Prohibition will now be re- 
pealed but, "Say pal, have ya got a 
butt?" 

KrLshmen often wonder whether the 
Knglish instructor counts .ill the words in 
a 12(M) word book report. 
ss- 

A fraternity at Marcjuette University 
has a skunk as a mascot. Needless to 
say that before being ple<lged. it under- 
went a mincjr operation. 

Unknown and unsung heroes: '1 he 
members of the touch football teams of 
the fraternities. Away from the cheering 
and excitement of a Saturday afternoon, 
these fellows grunt an<l groan for their 
dear old fraternity. Of assorted shapes 
and sizes, in old sweaters and sweatshirts, 
they bravely struggle on under the 
glaring arc lights of the lower level. ()ut 
of condition, they pant antl sweat with 
no helpful cheering section to give them 
moral support. There is no highly paid 
coach to train them, no importe<l officials 
at their games, no uniform- to protect 
their bones. Just a tifth-hand fcnnball 
with the white paint badly chipped and 
dulled. Kven so. in these collections of 
misfits, they have their "galloping ghosts", 
their Benny Frie<lmans and their Barry 

Woods. 

• ss- 

It happened during the night of a 
touch football game between two fra- 
ternities. As usual, among the sfHfctators 
were a half-dozen youngsters, one of 
whom was a son of i)r. Serex. A chem 
major recognizing him. called him over 
and tried to bribe the boy to get the 
questions for the next chem exam. 



Lewis C. Watt, S'lJl. in a recent letter 
to Professor R. H. Barrett of Farm 
Management writes, "We will winter 
about 125 purebred Hampshire sheep, 
M grades, some sows, horses, poultry, 
and two beautiful purebred Jerseys with 
calves, purchased from Folly F'arm. 1 
have charge of the livestock and take all 
the care of them. Great experience! 
And, believe me, it's experience that 
counts. Schooling is a great thing to 
have, but at best it only gives a founda- 
tion on which to build." His address is 
Airtop Farm. Sharon, Conn. 



John Brox, S'31, is combining some fun 
with his farming business at Dracut. by 
[)laying semi-professional football on the 
Lauriers. champions of the Lowell City 
League last year. Brox is still playing 
guard, his old position on the Stockbridge 
team during his two years in school here. 



i I.- 



A very successful initiation banquet 
was enjoye<l by A.T.G. members, initi- 
ates, alumni and guests at the Hotel 
Northampton last Wednesday evening. 
.^mong the faculty present were Messrs. 
Blondell, Barrett. Lowry. Packard and 
Thayer. The following alumni found it 
possible to be back and renew past 
acquaintances: John Brox S'.'5I and Omer 
Descheneaux, Thomas L. Abbott, Francis 
A. Dolan, Duane F. Carpenter, Stephen 
D. Ko\ar, Eldon D. Pond, E. Warren 
Skeltoii, all members of the ';j2 class. 



PIULILXRMOMC CONCERT 

In the Philharmonic Symi)hoiiy 
chest ra Sunday concert. Arturo Tosi\; 
will conduct a performance of Ikrn.irJ 
Wagenaar's second symphony and M ,, 
F!!nrico Bossi's "Intermezzi Goldun:. 
This program will be heard over the i.i 
in the Memorial Hall. 

THANKS 

The .Student Health Service wisln to 
thank the members of the SnnLut 
Senate for the new radio equipment gi\cn 
to the Infirmary for the benefit of In- 
firmary patients. 

TALK ON THE TROPICS 

Doctor Alma Stokey. professor of 
Botany at Mt. Holyoke College will i.,ive 
an illustrated talk on the tropics, Inilia. 
Java, and F'ormosa. in Room K, Fernald 
Hall, Tuesday, November 15 at 7.IJ0 p.m. 
This talk is held under the auspices of 
the Amherst Nature Club and any one 
interested is invited to attend. 

FOOTBALL INFORMAL 

A football informal sponsored by I'hi 
Zeta will be held in the Memorial Build- 
ing, Saturday. November 12 from S to 
11 p.m. Admission will be 25 cent* per 
person. 



Saturday night found 20 couples en- 
joying themselves at the first A.T.G. 
house party of the year. The house was 
decorated in real Halloween style with 
corn stalks and pumpkins strung around 
the room. The chaperons were Instructor 
and Mrs. Tuttlc and Professor and Mrs. 
L. S. Dickinson. Henry P. Williams, Jr. 
S':}2. was chairman of the committee in 
charge. 



The senior class have elected the fol- 
lowing new oftici-rs: President. Henry 
W. Merrill; Vice-President, Robert H. 
Burrell; Si-cretary, Charles R. Bonne- 
mort; Treasurer, Lawrence W. Marston. 



The two new senior members of the 
Stockbridge Student Council are: A. 
Lowell Eastman and George T. Mueller. 



|; ®n an^ off the "Row |; 

«{2^'{8^«5§^«!5^«$*'4^«i^'i^*«^*«^4***^4* PRKSiDENT BAKER TO 

\-ICIT AMIICD 



MANY FINE FEATURES ON 

SOCIAL UNION PROCRA.M 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

Barbary Coast Dance Orchestra will 
appear in iiowker Auditorium on F'riday 
evening, February 10. After their per- 
formance that night, it is hoped to have 
the Barbary Coast Dance Orchestra play 
for a tlance to be sponsored by tin- In- 
formal Committee. Dartmouth students 
who are members of the Musical Cliilis 
will be invited to attend. 

On Thurstlay evening, February 2.'>. the 
State College Musical Clubs, including 
the Glee Club, the Orchestra, ami the 
Chorus will i)resent their annual concirt. 

"Africans Are People" is the title of .i 
lecture to be deli\ered by Jim Wii^jn 
who with Francis Flood was the first 
white man to travel from coast to co;i!.t 
across the African lontinent north ol 
Lake Tschad. This lecture will conclude 
the S<Kial L'nion series for 19.{2-U>.'W 
and will be given on Wetlnesday evening, 
March S. 

.■Ml performances will be held in 
Bowker .Xuditoriuni and will begin at 
7 o"i lo«k. However, the Women's I.itlii- 
Symphony will be given at .'{..'id p.m., 
Sunday afternoon, January 15. 



Outstanding event of the week: 
my love to Normie." 



'( live 



After a smoker held by Delta Phi 
.Mpha. .Art Levine and several other sub- 
pledges were regreting their acquaintance 
with Lady Nicotina. 



Stretch Kennett. Theta Chi's 0' 4 ' 
freshman pledge, forgot to sleep with 
stockings on. The boys spent a restless 
.Tight. 



VISIT AMHERST FRIDAY 
(Continued from Page 1) 

presidency alter which Dr. King will 
deliver his inaugural address. 

On Saturday, the 50th Amherst- 
Williams football game will take place 
on Pratt Field which will be atten.'-' 
by Governor Ely as an aluniiiu- 
Williams and Former President Coolidge 
as an alumnus of Amherst. 



Three Sig's— Phi, Ep, and Kappa— 
have canine mascots but K.E. reports an 
all fraternity cat. She eats at the Kapi)a 
Ep raf but the boys at Theta Chi and 
(J.T.\'. share her at night to keep their 
beds warm. 



ATHLETICS BOARD REPORT 

In this issue we are publishing the financial feirort of the Athletics Board. The 
total expemiitures as given in this report amount to over twice the total expenditures 
for \cademic Activities for the same period. As this money is raised mostly by 
student tax the students should be interested in how it is spent. We regret that 
space does not permit the publication of a more detailed report, but any person 
interested may have access to the original report by making request at the Athletic 
Office in the Phvsictil F.ducation Buihling. 

Regulations concerning the management of Student Tax Funds were adopted 
last spring requiring officers in charge of Student Tax Funds to make an annual 
report on'Or before July 1st. These reports are submitted to the President and a 
summary of them is supposed to be published in the Collegian. It was due to a slight 
misun.lerstan.ling that the Academics reiK>rt was made avail.-ble for publication 
before the Athletics report. . ,, . 

The plpn seems to be a good one, but we wonder a little cynically how many 
students will be even casually interested in what happens to the .f24,0(X) and more 
that is spent on .Academics and At lilctics combined. 

EDITORIAL MISCELLANEA 

Getting ahe.id at the expense of others skiiis to be an accepted principle in 
American philosophy, but we do not think that the Cafeteria line is the proper place 
to (li-play such aggre^Mveiiess and lack of consideration for others. 

Will the annual pestilence of flies be allowed to return next year, or will some 
attempt at scientific fly control be made? 



Now that Dad's Day is over, the 
students can look forward to "Dean's 
Day" and see how they have fared during 
the first few weeks of school. The emin- 
ent position of being the king of Dean's 
Board is wide open and there are many 
who doubtless will be eligible for this 
honorary (?) position. 

Lambda Chi's beer mugs seem to be a 
forecast of the Repeal. . • Shaving is an 
excellent way to pass the time while 
waiting for the women. . . The movie 
passes of the Senate ought to be looked 
into. . . What, quiet hours with a xyllo- 
phone playing? ... The stool is not so 
dumb an idea for some of our college 
lovers only many of them prefer a bench. 
. . . Goofl thing the safety pin did not 
slip in Sig Ep's act. . . Honorable men- 
tion, the .\l I -.American water boy. . . 
Ballyhoo certainly reaches everyone, only 
it must be tame reading for the Foreign 
Legion. . . Mama, what is moron? . . . 
If there were only more backstages! 



The boys at Lambda Chi report that 
the fire chief has sent home his flaming 
red pajamas and now the boys can sleep 
in peace. 



CAMPUS VISITORS SEE 

FR.\TERNITY SKITS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

nately gruesome and comical takeoff 
from 'The Raven." Burns Robbin- 
the victim of the nightmare ga\e a 
realistic jwrtrayal of a "bad dream 
with all its thrills and freaks. The skit 
was built around a group of pi<tiires 
taken from a family album, which fur- 
nishefi material for a variety of posf* 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 4) 



All the laurels for originating and 
directing Sig Ep's win Saturday night 
go to George Aldrich. 



Ernie Fisher has sprained his thumb. 
The only explanation he will give the 
Alpha Gamma Rho boys is that he got it 
thumbing rides. 



Brother Bigelow, while not a student 
of Newton, was so anxious to make 
Dean's Board that he awoke the Sig Ep 
boys one night by exclaiming: 
I'm posted in Physics!" 



Bulldog Thompson, Alpha Sig> ' •"i"'_ 
potent Chef and High Keeper of the Dish 
Rag. has offered to contribute a retipe 
column to this paper for $5.00. W • ' ""^ 
public spirited citizen contribute? 

Household notes: Lambda Chi A'pha 
has just had its rugs cleaned by a trave ■ 
ing salesman. Will a wall-paper cemon 
strater please come around? 



• •* ** 



Alas for the bursting of an ideal! 
Delta Phi's perfect milkman presented 
them with his first bill. 



Culinary items: Louis Scott presented 
the Kappa Sigma diners with a new- 
brand of coffee made with a pressing 
cloth. 



Sigma Phi Epsilon's Miracle 
Jonnelly has cleaned his room two %v- 
in succession. 



Man 
•eks 



Featuring Don Donnolly— ttu ' 
man Kelly-and the Peckham t • ' 
'.•50 rang the gong on Dad's Day 

Bob Jackson, Kappa Ep's *"'"" ' J'^'^'^g 
demands a rebate on his room ren' -^ ^^ 
studies in the Library and only Mc f 
home. 



•*• 



SPORTS 



* 



Booters Tie Fitchburg 
Runners Beat St. Stephens 



nm«AY AGAm LEADS 
HILL AND BALERS 



State took the first five places in the 
cross-country meet held with St. Stephens 
at .\nnandale. November 4th. to triumph 
over the "Saints," l.'>-:iO. Bob Murray. 
in siiite of the fact that he ran off the 
course, finished first; four State men — 
Captain Caird. Crawford. Crosby, and 
Little shared the honors for second 
place. 

.Ma^s. State's outstanding sophomore 
runnir led the way from the start; and 
as there was little or no competition, he 
increased his lead to several hundred 
vards. Not knowing the course, Bob 
Murray became confused over the twists 
anil turns; and. near the finish, he ran 
at kist six hundred yards out of the way. 

.\fter the group of State runners who 
tied for second place came \'an Bynun 
of St. .Stephens, followed by Keil. Bob 
.\lkn finished in the ninth position; while 
Kuss Snow limjK'd in twelfth. However, 
in tlic final score these last three State 
runners were not considered; and so if 
the usii.tl method of displacement had 
Ijcin followed. St. Stephens would have 
|(i*t hy a larger score. 

Dunker Features Fresh 

Victory Over Jayvees 

In the cross-country meet held Nov. 2 
liitweeii tin' State junior \'.irsity and the 
State ireshmen, Dunker '.'10 placed first 
to lead his classmates in their 10-41 
victory. Prrxtor. Bishop, and Craft - 
.ill of '.'jii followed him in that or<ler to 
the finish. Boynton in fifth place was 
the first man of the seconds to come in; 
then came Daniels, Sha'. . and (iurka, 
also of the jayvees and Purcell of the 
ycar!iiit;> Jordan, the fifth man on the 
junior varsity to finish, ended u|i fif- 

trt'Iltll, 



Freshmen Take Third 
Place at New Englands 

Although Dave Caird finished in ninth 
place, the .Mass. .State cross-c(juntry 
Icon did not place in the New England 
IntercdUeijiates because only four mem- 
lifr. of (he team finished. The .State 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 1) 



JACKSON SCORES FOR 
BRIGGS-COACHED TEAM 

In a haril, fast, and evenly-matched 
game, the State booters battled the 
soccer team from Fitchburg State Teach- 
ers' College to a 1-1 tie in an overtime 
game at Fitchburg last Saturday. Both 
teams struggled to secure a winning point 
in the two five-minute overtime periotis, 
but neither one was successful. 

In the first peritKl Talbot, State half- 
back, gashed his hea<l when he bumpetl 
into the F'itchburg star forward. South- 
worth. The former had to be taken from 
the game and was replaced by Landsman. 
During the entire first half, the hall was 
carried up and down the field, neither 
side being successful in their scoring 
attempts. Many times the teachers 
threatened the St.ite g(xil; but the great 
defensive i)l.iy of Cowing and the other 
backs and the wonderful stops of "Doggie" 
lloiiran broke up the plays. The Maroon 
and White forwards were given the ball 
many times, but they also failed to con- 
vert any of their attempts intc) a tally. 

During the second half Fitchburg 
s<ored, Riley lMK>ting the ball through 
(Continued on Paftc 4, <'olumn 3) 

State Booters To Meet 

Connecticut Friday 

.State will meet the Connecticut State 
College booters o,i the .Alumni Field 
pitch in a game scheduled to be pl.iyeil 
.Armistice Day. Connecticut has hail a 
poor season to date; and if the State 
offense clicks, another victory should be 
chalked up for the M.irwni and White 
booters. 

In the first g.niie of the season, the 
Connecticut State team downed .St. 
Stephens. 5-1. Since then, they have 
lost successive games to Williams, .'{-(); 
to Wesleyan, 5-0; to Worcester Te< li, 
4-0; and to Clark, 1-0. On the other 
hand, State triumphed over Tech, 2-1. 
and over Clark, '.il; but in turn it has 
suffered ;i defeat by .Amherst ami a tie 
by Fitchburg. 

On the basis of these comparative 
s'.'ores, the .Aggies should be an e.isy 
victory for State. The Storrs booters 
have in most of their games played indi- 
viduallv. Consequent !>■ tlie-ir offense has 
(Continued on Paiie 4. Column 4) 



RYTKX STATIONARY 

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S 1 . per box 



A. J. Hastings 



NEWSDKALER and 
STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



tvi'ino-mimf:ographing 
dictation 

MISS MABEL MEAKIN 

Front Bement Coal Offices 
I o\v Rates Tel. 232 

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And that's the 

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"'0o.Iyear Welt System Employed" 



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Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Irescriptions I illed. Broken lenses 

accural' ly replaced 

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reliable makes 

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IDA M. BRIDGEM.W 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 
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teacher of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst, Mass. 



SIH)RTS CALtND.VR 



Friday, Nov. II 

\ .irsity S<Kver, Conn. Asiiie at Mass. State 
un the Muiiiiii l-'ield i)itt.'h at U) .i.iu 
Saturday. Nov. li 

\ar.sity Football,' Coast (liiard .\iaileiiiy at 
.\las.-i. Slate on .\luimii l-"ieUl al 2 p.m. 
Tuettday. Nov. 15 

InU'iliatcriiity sjiorts:! Finals 
Wednesday. .Nov. 16 

InUTfialciiiily Sih)iIs: I'iuals 
'I'llurHday, Nov. 17 

Xarsity Stuccr: Wesleyan al Ma^s. State 



4 
4 



Cbru the Iknot Ibolc 



4 
-4 



Dovie Hush for the seiond suciessi\e 
>ear has scored o\er KH) points ami is 
again leading the scorers of the nation 
with lOH points. His nearest rival is 
Mills of M.iltimore. Shell is .{.{rd among 
the eastern scorers with M points. I"ri- 
gard is in ixktl position with 20 points. 

Joe Stheff. the man with the educated 
toe. is in seventh position ii the scoring 
race for points after touchdown by kick- 
ing, having successfully (ointrted seven 
attemiits. 

The following are some interesting 
press ojinments on the .State footb.dl 
eleven and Hush in general: 

I'he Boston Post — The Mass.ichusetts 
State College football ele\eii are strong 
(ontenders for the * hanipionship of the 
New I-liiKland small colleges." 

/lie Berkshire Evening^ Eagle — "Hush is 
a better back than Albie HcMith." 

A s|>orts bulletin of the International 
News Service sent frtnn New York reails: 
"Right now. Hush f>f Massu husetts State 
is our favorite nominee for .\ll-.\merie.in 
honors at halfback. I-Or his size, it 
<l(HMi't seem there's anothtr player in 
the country as shifty and as sure a 
ground gainer as Lou. a ho makes an eel 
look like it was h.tinpered by jtontoons. 
He only wiiglis 140 pounds." 



'•ISTORIC HAMPSHIRE in the CONNECTICUT VALLEY 

By Clifton Johnson $2.50 

An ideal Christmas gift for the folks 

t 

A chapter on every town in Hampshire County i 

200 Illustrations — Photographs by the author and old prints ( 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



Harry Crtiss in the .Vcrc Vi'rk Herald 
Tnliitue praises the State star as "the 
most sensatifjn.il back s«» far this se.i 
sr>ii." He further comments: "His team 
mates and his opponents are so niueh 
bigger than Hush th.it he has learned to 
be .1 shifty, elusixc runner to avoid 
getting hurt." Mr. Cross further dis- 
plays his lack of accur.ite knowIc-<lge and 
lets his imagination run: "Hush buys 
his clothes in the boy's department of a 
clothing store." .And finally Cross com- 
ments: "Hush w.iiiteci to be a go<Ml farm- 
er .ukI study agriculture so he wt nt in 
Mas^irluis< tts State College." Oh well. 
^om<- people will n<-\<T h'.irnl 

The University of Detroit f<xjtball 
te.am ha'i a conferenc*- «)f its own, c.alle«l 
at the request of CoiK h (ius Dorais. to 
decide the questio.i of huddling or not 
huddling. .A vf)te among the members 
of the S(|uad rcsultc<l in an etjual division 
of r>pinion. The chief objection was that 
the huddle offered a chance for argument 
with the fpiarterlia< k over the choiie of 
play. Princeton avoifls that by ha\ing 
(he rpiarterback the last man to join the 
huddle, in the hofK- that he will ha\e a 
decision reatly and announce the play 
at fjnce. 



Tufts 18 Lowell Textile 7 

VASES 

and 

FLOWER POTS 
in 

Pottery and Glass 

Interesting in Shape and Color 

Miss Cutler's Gift Sliop 



State Do\vns Rensselaer 
Plays Coast Guard Next 



NAVAL ACADEMY TEAM 
HAS STRONG DEFENSE 

Co.ii h Mel Taube's Massiichusetts 
St.ite College Narsity football ele\en 
will attempt to win its sixth successive 
\ictory of the season when it meets a 
ruKv;ei| Coast (>uard Academy combine 
on .Alumni Field, Noxember 12. Co.ist 
("■u.ird has not enjoyed a very successful 
se;ison in the number of victories and 
defeats, lia\ing won but one game, 
losing two contests and playing two 
scoreless ties, but the Naval Schcnil 
turned back this year its great rival, 
.Norwich, S-0. 

Coast (luard opened the season with a 
sioreless tie against the Engineers from 
Worcester Tech, an eleven whi<h .Massa- 
chusetts State defeated lI.")-0. In its 
second contest, the Coast Ciuard team 
was overwhelmed by a strong Colb\ 
College eombine and sent down to di- 
feai, 21-2. However, the Middies eleven 
c.ime into the r.mks of the triiimphant 
for the first time during the sea.son when 
the CtKist (lUard athletes trampled o\ei 
Norwich, the great rival of Coast Cuard 
.Academy, in the "little Army-Navy" 
g.ime, .S-0. In the fourth tussle of the 
season, Rhode Island State was too 
powerful for the Co,tst Ciiarders ,ind tlu' 
ii,i\.il .school eli-ven w.is defe.ited lo (). 
Last week, Coast (iuaril played its fifth 
contest, a night game with Conned iciil 
State College, at the .Naval Ha.se at -New 
London. Connecticut, and the game 
ended, 0-0. 

Tlu' Coast ('■u.ird .Academy team is 
coached by Lieutenants .Merriman anil 
I inlay and these two officers Imm- de- 
veloped a very strong defensive <oin 
bination from the would be ii.iv.il oftinis 
that attend the institution. Coast (Juanl 
h.is become noted this year for its stub- 
born defensixe play, and has held its 
Ko.ll line uncrossed in three of its five 
five g.imes this se-ason. However, thi- 
naval coaches have been drilling the 
s»pia<l intensively the past week on the 
offensi- in an attempt to «levelo|» the 
scoring punch which heretttfore has been 
lac kinn in the Co,ist <iiiard attai k 
Co.ist (iiiard will start a heavy line a- 
gain^t Slate Saturday, with (he «eiilei 
and the two tai khs e.ic h weighing; oxti 
IKo |HHinds. In an attempt to speed up 
the Coast < ■u.ird offensive attack, two 
speedy linemen. Scalan and Columbus, 
weighing only ](>:> pounds apiece, will 
be at the giianl positions in the ('cMst 
< luard starting; lineup and will run 
(Continued on Pujte 4. Column A) 



BUSH TALLIES TWICE 
IN TAUBEMEN VICTORY 

Fighting desperately for three periods 
to oxercome a seven p<»int leail which 
the Engineers eleven had gained early in 
the first tpiarter. Coach .Mel Taube's 
Mas.s;ichusetts .State College fiMHball 
te.im fin. illy pien ed the .New ^'orkers 
lirilli.iiit defense and scored two tinicli- 
downs in the final perioil to burn back 
an uiuxpectedly strong Rensselaer Poly- 
tii hnic Institute combine IH 1.5 on 
Alumni Field last Saturday as the fea- 
ture of the Dad's Day program. State's 
victory was the fifth succe.ssixe win for 
the Maroon and White eleven this 
season anil increased its record to six 
xvins and one defeat, with Coast (iuard 
and Tufts .is the rem, lining opponents. 

The visitors jumped into a lead in the 
first fexv minutes of play when a .'L'iyard 
run by Root pi. iced the ball in position 
for a score on a lateral pass play. H. 
Dow lies to K. Downes. H. Downes 
suceessfully conxi-rted the extra point. 
During the first tpiarter .State played 
without the services of its stellar back, 
I. oil Hush, and the Taubenien attack 
could not seem to funilion sni<H)tlily. 
At the st.irt of the second cpiaiter. Hush 
entered into the lontest and although 
he reeled off several long gains for the 
.MarcKni and White eleven, Massiichusetts 
Sl.ite attack could not seem to break 
through the impregnable defense of tin- 
Engineers' team. The score at the half 
was Rensselaer 7, .State 0. 

Playing with renewed vigor, Massa- 
chusetts State clisplaxccl a powerful 
running anci .lerial att.u k in the tliircl 
cpiarter ancI crossed the- Reiissi l.ii-r goal- 
line lor its fii^t touclidown. -After a 
determined, rehntless attack h.icl cirried 
the ball clown to the Engineers' .'!,') y.ird 
hill, .Moe While. State halfback, hiiriecl 
a beautiful I/)- yard forward pass to 
Hush, who r.ic e-d twenty yards for his 
first loiiehdowii. .Miilliall failecj to con- 
xert llie extra point. 

In the fourth quarter, the Ntiibborn 
Kiiisse lai r attack clicked ,i(,;ain and the 
I'ait^ineers scoreil another touchdown ejti 
a lateral pass tc» iiurease its lead over 
Stale- l.'LO. Imniediatcly after the see ond 
l<e-iisselaer score, the Taubenien abaii- 
donicl its efforts to sh.ike Hush ItKiM.* in 
.1(1 cipen field by sxveeping end runs ancI 
resorted to a dee eplixe .lerial atlae k with 
threat sii< cess. U'liile .igain tosseel ;i lf)ng 
l>ass tc) Hush who se ,'ini|M-red through the 
Re-nssel.icr tcim for a tliirt\ y.ird gain 
(Continued on i'utr 4. (>>lunin 3) 



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HKAVY WKIf.HT AIL WOOL SIIAKKK S\VKATI:F<.S 
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Other slippers in quilted satin and in leather from ur,c to $2.7.') 

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OVERCOATS 

A year or so ago our Overcoats retailed for SoO.OO. Now you can buy 
these same Coats for $35.00. Langrock Clothes $35.00 and up. 



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AiBJVS oaD I w t rn 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1932 



BURBERRY COATS 

BurlK-rry niaUrials maintain an eciuable Uiiiperature in all cliniatc-s. from Poles to the 
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I 



VISITING PARENTS ENJOY 

SUCCESSFUL DAD'S DAY 
(Continued from P«g« 1) 

ridinK drill, t;i\iii !)> tlie Juniors and 
Seniors in the advanced military courses. 
Over three hundred onlookers were 
present as the (■<)inl)ine<l classes went 
tlirouj;h the olVicial troop drill of the 
U. S. Cavalry, under the sole direction 
of Senior officers. An informal recei)tion 
in the M Ihiildinn and environs lasted 
until the luncheon hour at I>rai)er Hall. 
At 2 in the afternoon the football team 
played host to the gridiron warriors from 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, with a 
capacity crowd fillinK the bleachers. Be- 
tween the halves r)f the >,'ame the annual 
I'reshman-Sophomore six-man rope pull 
added the touch of college tradition which 
was necessary to K>ve the d.uls a comi)lete 
impression of a campus community. 

Dean Machmer was the speaker at the 
Dad's Day supp«'r, which was scheduled 
frimi <■,.:{() to 7.40 p.m. at Draper Hall. 
The Dean welcomed the guests on behalf 
of both students and faculty. 

The entertainment of the evening; was 
furnished in Howker .Auditorium by the 
campus fraternities and sororities. In- 
tcrsi)ersed with on'hestral numbers by 
the Collej;e Orche.stra under the baton 
of E(\gdT Sorton ';«, the various skits 
presented proved equal to the hiji" 
standard of entert.iinment which the 
spirit of competition between the houses 
seemed to have jKophesied. 

The members of the Dad's Day com- 
mittee were as follows: Costas Caragi- 
anis '33, chairman; Edward Harvey '3.5, 
Clifton Ahlstrom "M, Parker Sisson '33, 
Sylvia \Vds<m '3.!, Frank llatstone '31, 
Ruth Campbell '34. Frederick Clark '34, 
Page Hiland '34, llarriette Jackson '34, 
Marjorie Jenson '34, W. L. Schenck '34, 
Elizabeth Wheeler '34, Mary Louise 
Allen '35. 



IIORi . SHOW OPENS FRIDAY 
IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION CAGE 
(Continued from Page 1) 
A roadside stand and a niiniature vege- 
table farm will be set up by the dei)art- 
ment of Olericulture. There will also be 
a model roadside fruit stand by the 
ponu)logy department, a forest ranger's 
camp by the forestry department, and a 
display of manufactured products by the 
horticultural manufactures department. 
There will be a general store in which 
products made and fiowers grown at the 
(ollege will be for sale. Any profit from 
this store will go to establish a fund to 
furnish working capital for future shows 
Wilfred 11. Ik-dord '33 heads the 
general committee of students and is 
assisted by William P. Hager '33, Samuel 
K. C.ilmore '33, and H. Paul Stephensen 
'3.5, for the department of Landscape 
Architecture, Roland K. Cutler '34, 
IVank A. Small S'33. and Lloyd I". 
Thompson S'33, Floriculture department. 
Lawrence Southwick '33, Polomogy de- 
l)artment, Costas I-. Caragianis '33 and 
Joseph F. Cooney S'33, department of 
Olericulture, Walter A. Maclinn '33, de- 
l)artment of Horticultural NLinufactures, 
Frederick C. Clark '34, Forestry depart- 
ment, and James W. lUandley S'33, anil 
James A. Cutter S'33, department of 
(ieneral Horticulture. 

The f.icidly advisory committee is 
composed of Professor Clark L. Thayer, 
chairman, head of the department of 
Floriculture; Professor l.yle L. Hlundell 
of the department of Horticulture; 
Professor Robert P. Holdsworth of the 
dei)artmcnt of F'orestry; William H. 
Armstrong of the Landscape Architecture 
department; Oliver C. Roberts of the 
Pomology department; Orant 15. Snyder 
of the \egetable dardening department; 
and Cecil C. Rice of the Horticultural 
Manufactures department. 



BUSH TALLIES TWICE 

IN TAUBE.MEN VICIORY 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 

before he was tackled on the five->ard 
line. Frigard hammered through center 
for the second State touchdown. Sibson 
was sent in to kick the extra point but 
his try was wild and Rensselaer led 13-12 
with the last quarter nearly over. 

The winning touchdown came after 
Smith, State's brilliant end, broke through 
into the Rensselaer backfield and blocked 
a punt. State recovering the ball on the 
Engineers' 18-yard line. On the next 
play, White hurled a 25-yard pass to 
Hush over the goal line for the final 
State score. 

Mush, White and Higelow played 
stellar roles in tlie State backfield, while 
the spectacular line play of Captain Leary, 
Smith, and Mountain featured in the 
Maroon and White forward wall. 
The line-up: 
Mass. State Rensselaer 



Fitchburg was very aggressive through- 
out the whole game, the teachers' for- 
ward line being exceptionally fast and 
clever. Pease and Soutluvorth played 
well for State's opponents; and if Ham- 
mond and Johnson, two of their stars 
who are laid up with injuries had been 
jilaying, the result might have been 
different for State. On the defense 
Fitchburg was weak; while it was the 
Maroon and White forward line that 
failed to function smoothly. Defensively 
State stood out with Cowing and Houran 
as the outstanding players. 

The summary: 

Massachusetts Stale — Houran, goal; Hodgson 
and Cowing, backs; Blackburn. I'ruyne and 
Talbot (Landsman), halfbacks; Mackiinnue. 
Kozlowski. Jackson. ». Taft (R. Taft) and Bern- 
stein (Hunter), forwards. . 

Fitchburg state Teachers' College — Spring, 
goal; Hopkins and Haggery, backs; I'easo, 
Robertson and Riley, halfbacks; Steeves, I'onte. 
.McWhitney, Southwortli ami Ivearns, forwards. 

Goals— Jackson, Riley. Referee— -Franzier. 



Mountain, le „■■<'• U'-*''™": 

(i.uowski. Sicvers, It ^.^ rt. ''".^•'••, ' '"'' 
l.eavitt. Burke, Ig rg, O'Connell, Davis, I'.irry 

I^ary c c. VVwinstein 

Sibson. Nietupski, rg l8. Sturges, Lenhard 

Cumniings. Mulhall. It It. Jvolcszar 

Smith, Ryan, re . „ ,^ ' 'J?''^''^ 

Bigelow. l^iko. qb qb. B. Downes btoi.-r 

White. Shcff. Ihb ... ^''I'v^S"'.' 

Consolati. Bush, rhb Ihb, K. Downes 

l-rigard. fb ^^- "**''' 



J.\CKS()N SCORES FOR 

BRIGGS-C().\CIIED TEAM 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 
for the Teachers. Then the State ma- 
chine began to click; but the Maroon 
and White IxKrters had to carry the ball 
<lown the field twice before Jackson. 
State forward, shot it into the net. For 
two extra i)eri()ds. both teams played 
hard and fast to break the deadlock, but 
neither team was able to gain the winning 
goal. 



STATE BOOTERS TO MEET 

CONNECTICUT FRIDAY 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 

been ragged, characterized by poor 
passes. On the defensive, they have two 
good i)layers- Luchtenberg and Clark; 
while offensively Rose, Mason, Turner, 
iind Tamsky stand out. If the State 
defense is as tight as it was ag.'inst 
I'itchburg, few tallies will be made by 
the visitors; while the forwards shouhl be 
able to penetrate the Connecticut de- 
fense. 



"Student Prince" interspersed with solos 
by William Muller and Miles Boyl.m. 

A touch of real campus life wa- fur. 
nished by Theta Chi in "(Juiet Hours," 
while Phi Zeta, attired in modcnistjc 
black and white pajamas put rl)^s 
some snappy rhythm. 

The performance of the college . ;. 
chcstra before and after the ent» rt.iin- 
ment as well as at intermission was a 
credit to the leatler F-dgar Sorton and to 
the students who took part. 

The complete program follows: 

Rackozky March 3f \ Old Unnfuxrian \hlaii 
Bourree Back 

College Orchestra 

1. Student Princes Lambda Chi Alpha 

2. While You Wait Alpha Lainlrii Mu 
'A. Mock Senate Meeting Alpha si .i pij, 
4. Quiet Ilouis lln'i.Mta 
."i. The Killing of Aar on Kale lambda Oi-lia Mu 
6. .\ Night .Mare Sigma I'hi I'lHilon 

Selections Victor llahtn 

College O.chestra 

7. The All American Team (J. T. V. 

8. Maybe the Movies Were Right 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

9. And the Willin Still Pursueder 



10. Back Stage 

11. The Horse Thief 

12. The Mirage 



Intermezzo 



College Orchestra 



Kappa ICpsilon 

F'ni Zfti 

Sigma Beta Chi 

Kappa Signia 

Birti 



FRESHMEN TAKE THIRD 

PLACE AT NEW EN(;LANDS 

(Conilnued from Pafte 3) 
freshnian team finished in third place, 
led by Dunker ami PnMtor who ended 
in seventh and eighth positions respec- 
tively. 

In the freshman race, eight colleges 
entered seven men each. New Hamp- 
shire won with five of the Wildcats lead- 
ing all other men to the finish. North- 
eastern captured secontl i)lace, while 
State took third. After Dunker and 
PrtKtor, the first Manwn and White 
runner to fini.sh was Hishop in 17th 
place. Walter Lewis was 3.")tli. I lager 3Sth, 
Gotldard 43r<l. and P. H. Anderson 44th. 



New Hampshire also won the varsity 
race from the other ten colleges with 
individual honors going to Jellison of 
Hates. Bob Murray pushed the winner 
for the first three miles; but as they were 
climbing the hill at the end of the third 
mile, the Holyoke sophomore fell ex- 
hausted and was unable to finish the 
race. Red Crawford's legs went back on 
him after about two and one-half miles 
and so he too h;ul to (juit. .\t. the end of 
the fourth mile. Little was killed off; 
and so only four State runners ran the 
full five miles. Caird was first to finish; 
and then there was a long gap before 
Keil came in (Mith, .Mien liTth, and 
Crosbv 7()th. 



FISHER'S 

CORDUROY 
SUITS 

Wine, Green, Brown, Navy 

In two styles 
Sizes 14 to 20 

$3.95 



CAMPUS VISITORS 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 

including a striking one of a mother and 
a laugh-provoking one of the subject at 
a very tender age. The acting of the 
Peckham brothers. Richard and Robert, 
attired as sprites in vivid green and rose 
was much appreciated by the audience, if 
shouts of laughter are any indication. 

"The Mirage" presented by Kajjpa 
Sigma was a humorous sketch depicting 
the vision of two desert wanderers. The 
presence of "K" Ed Harvey's police pup 
addetl interest to the iH-rformance as 
well as Ed's own appearance in a grass 
skirt and bandana. 

Lambda Chi .Alpha characteristically 
inculcated music in their performance 
which comprised selections from the 



M. S. C. MENS MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

"Lr/ Dave do it" 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 
Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

14 MAIN STREET 

Between Town Hall and Masonic Buildlnii 

MEN'S WHOLK SOLES and,. „ $2.25 

1.50 

.40 

1.25 

LADIES' RUBBER HEELS .30 

LADIES' LEATHER IIEKLS .25 

AH Work Guaranteed 



NAVAL ACADEMY TEAM 

HAS STRONG DEFENSE 
(Continued from Pafte 3, 

interference for the Middy backs. The 
Coast ("luard backfield is compose<l of 
light, fast men, with Captain David, 
fullback, as the outstanding ball-carrier. 
Schereschewky, the Coast Cuard 1S.> 
pound tackle, is a brother of the great 
Harvard fullback last year, John S<here- 
schewky. The starting Coast Guard 
team will a\'erage 173 pounds in the line 
and It'll pounds in the backfield. 

Coach Mel Taube has been busy the 
past week correcting the defects in Mas.s.i- 
chusetts State's |)lay against RensseUr 
and will send his strongest team <m tht- 
field next Saturday against Coast (iuard 
Academy. Joe Sheff, State halfback, 
whose valuable punting was sorely 
missed in the Rensselaer contest, will 
start in the Marcnm and White backfield. 
Of the Coast (iuard team Co;ich Taube 
remarked: "Coast (iuard has a ver>' 
strong defense and should offer stiff 
opposition to our attack." 



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All Wool Blankets for . . . $2.<).") and up 
Part Wool Blankets for . . . Uoc and up 

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Typing 
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MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



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NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 
for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



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and Radio Equipment 

— PHILCO= 




College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATII, Reg. Pharm. 
AMIIERST. • MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



AND 



NORMA SHI-ARl.R 

'*SMILIN' THRU 



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MAJESTIC RADIO 

TH[ MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



with IRKDRIC MARCH 
LKSl.lE HOWARD \ 

Friday. Nov. 11 

George Raft — Constance Cummings 
Mae West— Alison Skipworth - in 

"NIGHT AFTER NIGHT" 

Saturday, Nov. 12 

Zane Grey's Novel 

"THE GOLDEN WEST" 

with GLORGK OBRIKN 
Monday, Nov. 14 



COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Collegiate Sport wear for Men and Women 

Riding Habits, Boots, Hilcing and Sport Jacket? 

We give free carfare with purchases of So.OO or up 



Yale was just a bowl of cherries - to 

"RACKETY RAX" 

The All- American Football Scream 
with Victor McLaglen— (">reta Ni>son 

Tuesday, Nov. 15 



Walter Huston — Lupe Velez 

in 'KONGO" 

with— Conrad Nagel— Virginia Bruce 



THE CANDY KITCHEN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 



SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 



INCORPORATED 



4- 



^ A CURRENT EVENT IN 
J&. THE COLLEGIAN 



Clautcn U cominft. 







IS. A. C. Library, 



Collegian 



OlITKTANDINt; EVENT 
OF THE WEEK 



The llorlit-ullural .Sh<>w 
lukea ull ihe honor, thia 

M«.>«k. 




a,' 



Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1932 



Number 8 



Brilliant Hort. Show 

Attracts 7000 Visitors 



Unusual Exhibits and Large Floor 

Space Aid in Production of 

Highly Successful Display 



Thousands enjoyed the fine show put 
on i)V the (li\ision of Horticulture in the 
cage of the Physical Education building 
last Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Lx- 
hibitions and competition classes staged 
by students of Massac;husetts State Col- 
lege formed the greater part of the show, 
while the remaining space was taken by 
commercial growers and by the in)lyoke 
and .Northampton Florists' and Garden- 
ers' Club. 

During the time the show was oj)en to 
the public, about seven thousand people 
from all over the state took advantage of 
the ojjportunity to look over the varied 
gardens and displays which rivaled those 
of large city shows. Favorable com- 
ments and congratulations upon the show 
were received from many commercial 
men and interested people all over the 
state. 

Student participation in all departments 
of the Horticultural division of the 
college made the show the best that has 
ever been put on here. The department 
of Landscape Architecture set up the 
central feature of the whole exhibition, a 
formal garden with a pool, fountain, and 
acolorful border of hardy chrysanthemums. 
.\ natural hillside garden with a running 
brook was also done by the Landscape 
students. 

Competition classes and exhibitions of 
chrysanthemums made up the section of 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 

Fruit Judging Team To 
Travel to N. H., W. Va. 

Powell, Southwick. and Wheeler to 
Take Part 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

And yet these alters, wreathed with fhtwers 
And piled utth fruits, awake again 

Thank-siLiiiinii fiv the gUden hours. 
The early and the later rain. 

— Whittier, h'or An Autumn Festival 



Thursday, Nov. 17 

17 .(Mt p. III. Social I'nion 
J'J.OO p III. iMMUball Rally. Drill Field 
Shturduy, Nov. 19 

12.(X) noon Varsity Cross-country at North- 
eastern 
2.00 p.m. \'ursity Football, Tufts at MeU- 
for<l 
Sunday, Nov. 20 

9.00 a.m. Sunday Chapel, Rev. Bernard 

Clausen 
2.00 p.m. Outing Club Hike to Mount 

Monadnoc'k 
.3.(X) p.m. Radio Concert, Memorial Hall 
7.(X) p.m. KeliKious Confereme. Reverend 
i lausen, Howker Auditorium 
Monday, Nov. 21 
7.00 p m. ReliKious Conference, Reverend 

Clausen. Memorial Hall 
«.30 p.m. Glee Club, Memorial Hall 
Tuesday, Nov. 22 

7.00 p.m. Religious Conference, Reverend 

Clausen 
8.00 p.m. Campus Chorus 
S.OO p.m. I>batint{ Society, Memorial Bldg. 
WedneMlay, Nov. 23 

12 noon ThunksgivinK Recess begins 
Monday, Nov. 28 
X.OO a.m. Tlianksgiving Recess ends 
HMO p.m. Glee Club 
TueMlay. Nov. 29 

K.OO p.m. Campus Chorus 
Thursday, December 1 * 

4X10 p.m. Collegian distribution 



DEAN MACHMER GOES TO 
UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE 



Mass. State College will be represented 
at the First Annual New Kngland Fruit 
Judging Contest at the University of 
•New Hampshire, Saturday, November !".>, 
by lowiisend H. I'owell ".i'.i, Lawrence 
Southwick '3.'i, and Nelson A. Wheeler 
"■ii. The contest will be a four-sided 
affair with the University of Maine and 
Connecticut Aggie also competing. 

The team selected and coached by 
I'rol. A. P. French, will also enter a 
second meet, the Eastern Intercollegiate 
fruit Judging contest at Morgantown, 
West Virginia, December '.i. This will be 
a more interesting trial as teams from as 
far west as Indiana will be judging. In 
both events the winning team receives a 
cup that will be held [)ermanently if 
taken three years in succession and the 
t*o lii^hest individuals receive medals. 

IMIILIIARMONIC CONCERT 

In the last concert of the first part of 
"'* I'll ii harmonic-Symphony season, Mr. 
Tos<,iriini will conduct a Beethoven- 
\\agn(r program on Sunday afternoon, 
^ovemt)er 27. The "Eroica" symphony 
*''! open the program; Paul Alth use 
and Lisa .Allen will sing in the third 
^ene of Act I of "Die VValkure," which 
*^s ■' number in the special Wagner 
•^'fflceri of November 2, and the program 
*dl close with the prelude and finale 
'f^'m Tristan und Isolde," with Mme. 
Alsen IS the soloist. 



Fifty Years Since Last Conference 
Was Held 

At the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New- 
York, Dean William Machmer attende«I 
the Conference of Universities under the 
auspices of New York University on 
Noveml)cr 15 and Ki. 

Fifty years have passed since the last 
Conference of Universities was held in 
Chicag«). The pur|K)se f»f these confer- 
ences i.s to observe what .American col- 
leges are <l<)i ig to advance e«lucatioa in 
their respective fields; what im|)ortant 
changes have taken place during the last 
half century in eilu<ation, an<l how do 
colleges conduct their official business. 
Other (juestions are: What recognition 
shall the uni\ersities take of the new 
business conditions? What attiturle shall 
the college take toward religion? Toward 
a changing world and a new s<xial order? 
•Ml these (|uestions will be discuss«'d by 
speakers from llarvanl, ('oluiiibia, HulTa- 
lo, Chicago, and New York Universities. 



OUTING CLUB NOTICE 

Thc-^e will be an Outing Club hike 
>unr]av November 20 to Mt. Monad- 

'^''^- 1 hose planning to go should see 
|ed Crawford, Charlie Daniels or Laura 

'"gnani, as soon as possible. The cost 
°*/he hike will be $1.00. Transportation 

' leave the East Experiment at seven 
'"^lock Sunday morning. Those who go 
* "iJi'l be sure to wear warm clothes, for 
^re IS snow on the tcp of the mountain. 

. > •^■^dent who has a car and would 
1'^'^ to t.ike it on the trip will be paid 

'" tbr; use of the car by the Outing Club. 



COMPARISON OF JAPANESE 

AND AMERICAN COLLEGES 

Similar and yet nf)t similar might well 
describe the <lilTerence between the State 
College and Chiba Horticultural College 
of Japan from which school has come 
Kannosuke Mori, a graduate student of 
landscai)e architecture. No one particular 
collegiate activity, scholastic or social, is 
identical with a similar activity here. For 
instance, take the matter of courses. 
The courses in themstlves are almost 
identical with those given on this campus, 
but in the Japanese- Sch«x)I all are re- 
quired. There are no electives. During 
the first year the L5() students who attend 
the school study botany, chemistry, 
drawing, English, ethics, field crop, flori- 
culture, landscape architecture, meterolo- 
gy, physics, pomology, surveying, and 
gardening. During the second year 
similar studies are followed, engineering, 
botany, English, entomology, ethics, flori- 
culture, landscape architecture, physics, 
plant pathology, pomology-, and garden- 
ing. For the third and final year the 
same courses are given as during the 
second plus drawing, and surveying. 

Very few text books are used, the 
courses being delivered in the form of 
lectures and each student compiles his 
own texts from notes. Classes begin at 
eight o'clf)ck and continue hourly until 
twelve. An hour is given for dinner, and 
in the afternoon laboratory and field work 
continue until live o'clock. 

Extra curricula activities take the form 

of department clubs and musical groups, 

and athletics. Each of the major studies 

such as botany and Ian(l8<a[>e architec- 

(Continued on Fafte 4, Column 4) 



FIRST SOCIAL UNION 
TO BE HELD TONIGHT 

Saveli Wnlevitch to Interpret 
Russian Folk Songs 

Sijveli Walevitch, interpreter of Russian 
folk songs and gypsy ballads, will give a 
program of Russian music at the first 
Sixial Union program of the term tonight 
in StiK-kbridge Hall. 

Russian folk songs represent the life 
and customs of the Russian people, and 
are s|)ontaneous authentic creations in 
artistic form. The remlition is governed 
by mood and circumstance, and the songs 
must be |)erformed with all their charac- 
teristic irregularities and im])erfections 
of harmony and rhythm, ea<h a law unto 
Itself. It is best left to the diantalic 
artist, as to Waleviti'h, unhampered by 
conventional style, to inter|)ret with free- 
dom this music, born of the soul of a 
people. 

Saveli Walevitch has been heard in 
many colleges and universities, as well as 
preparatory sch(x>ls in this country. His 
dramatic work also includes programs in 
France, club entertainments, and radio 
broadcasting. 

Newspajx-rs throughout the country 
speak highly of him. A representative 
number have been quoted: 

"For the first time in its history the 
Folies Hergeres . . . vibrated with the 
plaintive folk songs and gypsy ballads of 
old Russia as interpreted by Saveli 
Walevitch. His voice is soft and tender, 
or harsh and loud as the mcMxl of the 
song dictates, and in his music is felt the 
(Continued on Page 2, Column S) 



Religious Conference to 
be Held November 20-22 




Rev. Bernard C. Clausen 



NOTICE 

In view of the fact that college 
activities will c<sjr Ti xt We<lf>c-.day 
in observance of the four-<lay Thanks- 
giving recess, the C'ollixuin will not 
In- e<lited next week. The next copy 
will be publishe<l on Thurs<lay of the 
following week. 



ANNUAL STUDENT CHEST DRIVE 
SrARIED 

With the atuiouni ement of the solici- 
tors secured for the stjrorities, frat<-rni- 
ties, anri dormitories, the plans for the 
.innual Student Chest rlrive whi< h began 
yc-sterday are in o|H'ration. The solirilors 
are as follows: 

The .M)l)ey Mary Emma Kingston 

anil Ruth Avery 
l)ra|)er Hall Josephine Fisher 

.Mpha Lambda Mu Alma Merry 

(Conilnued on Pa^c 4, Column 3) 

McCUCKIAN TO ATTEND 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

Ambrose T. McGuckian '."{4, <>i the 
Imal Q.T.V. fraternity has been elceted 
as a delegate to represent the Uh-.i] Intra 
fraternity Council during the 1!».{2 .session 
of the Naticjnal Interfraternity Confer- 
ence, which will be held at the Hotel 
Pennsylvania, New York City, on Friday | 
and Saturday, November 25 and 26. 

Two of the topics to be brought ui> 
before the national assemblage which are 
of particular interest to members of local 
fraternities, are: deferred rushing and the 
operation of fraternity dining systems. 
Mctiuckian, who is secretary-treasurer of 
the lo<:al council, and a graduate <jf 
Jamaica Plain High School, includes 
membership in varsity cross-country and 
hockey teams and class football, crcjss- 
country and hockey teams among his 
activities. 



BERNARD C. CLAUSEN 

firaduate of Colgate University, A.M. 
and M..^., 1915; of the Union Theological 
Seminary. 1918; Syracuse University, 
D.D., 1922; Chaplain of U. S. Navy, 1917- 
1919 in anti-submarine service on bojird 
L'SS North Carolina. Pastor, First 
Baptist Church, Hamilton, N. Y., 1919- 
1920. Pastor. First Baptist Church, 
Syracuse. N. Y.. since 1920. Author of 
"The .Miracle of Me," "The Dfx)r That 
Has .No Key." "Pen Portraits of the 
Twelve." etc. 



COLLEGE OFFICIALS 

AHEND CONFERENCE 

Annual Meeting of Association of 

Land (^rant ColleHtes to Discuss 

Current Prttblems 

.Attending the- annual meeting of the 
.Association of Land (.rant Colleges, Dean 
William Mac Inner, Director of the Ex- 
tension Service Willarcl Munson, Director 
of the ExiH-riment Station Fred Sievers, 
and Profc-.ssor Edna Skmner have l>een 
in Washington, D. C. since Monday. 

Each year the AsscM-iation of Land 
(irant Colleges reviews the work of (he 
preceding year of the- schools represented 
and fornudatcs new plans for the coming 
yc-.ir. The- lour m.ijor problems con 
sicU-red at the meeting jK-rtain to resident 
teaching, home- economics, the- extension 
service, and the ex|Kriment station. 

"The effect of the present eceinomie- 
clirficiillii's on the \arious departments of 
the Land (.rant selHM>ls will be analyzed 
this year," saiel Dean Machmer befcjrc- 
his departure. "All these universitie-s 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 3) 

NEWS FROM CAP IAIN SU.MNER 

News from the |K>j)uIar Captain Edwin 
Miles Sumner, who last August was 
transf.rrecl from the college military 
depart men! to take a training course for 
officers at Fort Riley, Kansas, was n* 
vealed r«-cently in a letter written to W. 
(irant Dunham '.{4, who re-ceivc-d (he 
missive by virtue e»f being Captain 
Sumfier's successor as Icacler of the 
college band. Captain Sumner expressed 
the elesire of the memljers f»f his family 
■ind himself to be re-meinbcred to the 
many friends in Amherst and \ic inity to 
whom they had become attached during 
their seven year stay, ;ind c-onfirmed their 
strong hcjmesie kness for the college by 
entering a subscription for the Collrf^mn. 

Admirers of Captain Sumner will be 
interested to learn that his new trai.iing 
not only consists of classwork and \n:r- 
fcctiejn of the mounterl officer in grui-Iing 
practie-e rifles, but also a course in aerial 
observation, which entails reeonnaissimc e- 
missions while in flight. The Captain 
mentioneel the pleasure in this |)articidar 
phase fjf training as compared to the 
hours of concentrated study necessary 
for research work in daily assignments. 
With characteristic humor, the former 
band leaeler told of the sufx-riority of the 
Massachusetts State f'ejllege Band over 
the Kansas University organization, and 
expressed his delight at the remarkable 
reeord of Louis Bush, stellar State half- 
back, as high (Kiint see^rer of the nation. 

Captain Sumner's friends and those 

acquainted with his many accomplish { 

ments will remend)er that he was last 

year the one meiiilwr of the faculty tej 

(ConUnued on Page 3, Column I) 



Rev. Bernard Clausen of First Baptist 

Church in .Syracuse. N. Y. 

to be .Main Speaker 

"The power of Christ to proviele the 
more- abundant life" is the theme of the 
three cl.iy religious conference to be held 
on campus from Novend)er 20 to 22 
under the leadership of Rev. Bernard C. 
Clausen of (he l-irst Bapti.st Church in 
Syracuse, N. N'. The conference is 
sponsored by the Christian Asseniation, 
(he Y.W.C.A., and the Advisory Board 
fo the United Religious Work. 

Rev. Bernard Clausen has addressed 
not only the students of this college but 
the students e)f Vassar, Wellesley, Cornell, 
Mt. Hf)lyoke, and Meredith. He is 
ri'cognized as a leader of religious thought 
and it is liecause t)f his dominant |K)sition 
in religion that he was chosen by the 
Christian Assex-iation to lead this con- 
ference. 

In a letter to J. Paul Williams, the 
Director of Religious Edue~atiem and 
aelvisor of the student cejnfercnce com- 
mittee, Bernard Clausen gave his plans 
(Conttnuod on Page 4, Column 1) 

Clausen to be Assisted 

by Five Other Speakers 

Discussions to Re Held in Fraternities 
and Dormitory 

As leader oi the religious e onferenee on 
campus from Novendnr 20 to 22, the 
Reverend Bernard Clausen will be assisted 
by W. j. Kitchen, Waiiaix- Rons, Rabbi 
Harry Kapl.in, Professor Helen Wolcott, 
and Brooks Anderson. While the cem- 
fe-renee lasts, this grou|> will make con- 
tacts with students te) carry tmi the 
pur|H>se of the confcn-nce. 

Mr. W. J. Kitchen is the student -wcjrk 
se-eretary in the New l-'pgl,inc| district of 
the Y.M.C.A. Wallace Ross comes from 
the Massjtc huse (ts Institute of Tech- 
nology where he is connected with the 
Christ i, in .Association. Rabbi Harry 
Kaplan who t imuc-s from Pit(sficld .s[>e>ke 
on this campus List year. Professejr 
Hcdc-n Wcdcott is |)rofc-ss<ir of (he llis(ory 
and Li(cra(nre ol Re ligion at Mt. Hc^lye^ke 
College. Brooks .Anclerson, profess«ir of 
Religion at Brown University has In-en 
active in the Northlicid confe-reiices. 

Seven fraternities. Phi Sigma Kappa, 
Sigma Phi l-lpsilon, Ka()|)a Sigma, Kappa 
E|>silon, Alpha (ianima Rho anci Delta 
Phi Alpha, will act as hosts to those 
assisting Rev. Clausen. These- men will 
live at the fratc-rnitic-s while Professor 
Wolcejtt will live at the Adams House. 
After the meetings under the leader, each 
evening discussions are- e-xiM-cted te» take 
pl.ic e in (he fratc'rni(ies ancI sororities 
lM-(ween the guests anel students. 

Dise ussions with any inendur e>f the 
confen-nee staff may be arranged during 
the time- of the conference through Mr. 
Willi.ims, Miss C.impbell, and Benton 
Cummings. 

MEITAWA.MPEE CLUB PLANS 

Members »>! the .Met tawani|H'e- Club 
are planning two more meetings tf» wind 
up the fall s«-ason. The first will be a 
hike to M(. Tf>by, Oc (ejbe-r 20 to fix up 
(he club cabin, eliink up the walls, put 
up bunks and clear trails. The final 
event will be the annual banrpiet held 
Sjiturday, after the close of final exam 
week. The banquet will be preeeelcd by 
a hike- tf) Mt. Toby. 

The .McttawamiH-e Club, (he faculty 
Outing Club,- has so far enjejyed three 
trips, two to IVlt. Toby and ejne along 
[lart f)f ibc- original Moh.iwk Tr.iil. 

NOTICE 

R.AI.LN' I c.r the Tuf(s r,.itne. Cemiet 
WHERE Drill Field. 
WHEN- 9 p.m. Thurselay night after 
Sex iai I'niem. 

SPrCAKERS BAND BONFIRE 

DON'T MISS it: 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1932 







CoUcQian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

W. Raymond Ward '33 

liditor-in-Chitf 



EUCBNC GURALNICK "33 

Managing Edilar 



Alfrsda L. Ordway "33 
Assocuti* Editor 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 

Editorial 

W. Raymond Ward "33 

Campus Athletics 

Raymond Royal '34. Fditor Thfodokb M. Leaby '35 

Alfrbda L. Ordway '33 Silas Littlb. Jr. JS 

Ruth U. Campbell '34 
Harriettb M. Jackson '34 

Mary L. Allen '35 r,^i.— .»— 

David L. Arenbbrg '35 , Eicbanfteg 

Elizaueih K. Hakrin(.ton '35 AlfreUa L. Ordway 33. Editor 

Feature 
Stanly F. Sbpbrski '34 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
Adv4rtiiing Manager 

Frank Batstone '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ASHLBY B. Gurney '33 

Business Manager 



Buelness Asslatante 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Manager 

W. Lawrence Sciibnck '34 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 

Entered a» second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
Of postoge provided for in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



4. 4. ^ EDITORIALS ^ ^ 4^ 



STATE 



The final words of the last scene in a 
stirring drama: "His fraternity pin is a 
thing of beauty and a joy forever." 

— — s* 

Believe it or not, but it actually 
happened : 

Dr. I'owers: "What is horsepower?" 
'a.'): "The actual amount of work 
that a horse does." 

ss^ 

Do pretty co-eds who cheer so wildly 
at football games know what ail the 
shouting is about? A survey of feminine 
football knowledge conducted by a 
feminine reporter on the weekly student 
newspaper at Arizona State Teachers 
College indicates that they are a trifle 
vague as to their terms in spite of their 
enthusiasm. Here are a few of their 
definitions of football terms: 
Huddle- When players fall on top of one 

auollier. 
Punt -When one player kicks another. 
Kn<l sweej)- End man makes a big circle. 
Off tackle |)lay When a player missed 

the man he is trying to tackle. 
Ou.-irterback sneak \\ hen no one is look- 
ing the quarterback sneaks up on the 
ball. 
Line smash — When the players bump 

into each other. 
Quarterback -The player who does all 

the running. 
Place kick —When the ball is kicked so it 

will land in a certain place. 
A >id nothing can be done about it. 




Stochbrl&ge 



4- 



Last Friday on Alumni Field, Stock- 
bridge School's football warriors sent 
Essex County Agricultural School down 
to defeat by a score of 7-0. Held in check 
for three periotls and the greater |)art of 
the fourth period, Stockbridge unleashed 
a rapid-fire aerial attack in the last few 
minutes of play which culminated in the 
winning touchdown. 

Stockbridge and the Essex Aggies had 
been fighting valiantly, with neither side 
being able to score, until in the waning 
minutes of play, Stockbridge let loose 
with three successive forward passes, 
bringing the ball well up within the 
shadow of the Aggie goal fX)sts. Eldred 
then plunged over for the touchdown on 
a line buck, after which he added the 
extra point with a well placed kick. 

Jaeger and Eldred were outstanding 
for Stockbridge, as was the punting and 
forward passing of F'rescott. 




Everett W. Miller S'24 and Charles 
Pitt vS'27 returned to attend the Flower 
show last week-end. 



Kolony Klub, A.T.G., and Q.T.V. 
fraternities assisted in entertaining the 
members of the Essex County .Agricul- 
tural School football team on Friday, 
November H. 



I 



CLAUSEN IS COMING! 

Rernard Clausen is probably the most popular minister ever to speak here. Many 
seniors and juniors still remember the address he gave on anger in Sunday Chapel 
two years ago. The Christian Asso<iation and the V.W.C.A. have indeed been for- 
tunate to induce Bernard Clausen to spend three days with the students on this 
campus. He seems to have the rare ability of making religion interesting, useful, 
and inspiring, and more sensible than ever before. That is what makes him a modern 
minister antl so popular with his congregation and the many students to whom he 
has spoken. He is worth hearing. 

Five other capable leaders will be here at the same time. As Professor of the 
History and Literature of Religion at Mt. Holyoke College, Helen Wolcott has had 
wide experience in the needs and interests of women students. Those who heard 
Rabbi Harry Kaplan when he s|)oke here last year and two years ago will remember 
him for his sound judgment and c|uiet sincerity. Bill Kitchen, Wally Ross, and 
Brooks Anderson are all men with boyish hearts. They can be as gay as any college 
man and they have never lost the student's point of view. But they also see the 
deepest meanings of life; they are men whose lives show vision antl purpose. They 
are men worth knowing. 

THE MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Recently the Colle^idn received a communication saying: 

"\ few years ago I was a student at a schtjol, the principal of which had a very 
vital interest in this college. His son was a student here when he enlisted in the Air 
Service in the late war. The son was shot down in France, and his name is on the 
Roll of Honor in the Memorial Building. I have often wondered how that father 
would react to seeing two freshmen walk in and not remove their hats. It is seem- 
ingly a little matter, and maybe I place too much emi)hasis on it. I wonder what 
you think." Francis Loral 

That two freshman walked into the Memorial Building with their hats on is in 
itself a small matter, but other pe<jple have sfxiken to us about the same laik of 
appreciation of the significance of the Memorial Building. Not two freshmen, but 
many students have walked into the Memorial Building with their hats on, have 
thrown their coats and hats down on the furniture, have put their feet up on the 
tables and chairs, have stuffed the ash receixers with paper and used them for roly- 
polys. All the students seem to call it the "M" building, never thinking that it is a 
memorial dedicated to the men who fought and died for this country in the World 

War. 

Those men deserxe more than the grandest memorial money can build, and they 
descrxe our respect: that is the least we can give them to show our appreciation for 
their sacrifice. They did not realize that the war made the world si»fe for hypocrisy 
and for communism; they did not realize that it was not a war t(» end war. They 
gave their lives with motives that were pure and unselfish, and let us always respect 

them for it. 

But our war h.roes have died in vain if the youth of this nation merely continues 
to respect and admire them without profiting by their mistake. Have the noble 
dreams those boys had come true? Did the World War make the world safe for 
deuKK-racy? /:>»(/ the World War end all war? We hardly think so. 

The heroes of the late war shouUl be remembered and rcstx-cted, but when this 
country next enters into war, let it be in spite of the efforts of its youth, not because 
of them. Truly, it is a far higher patriotism to live for one's country than to die for 
its economic interests. 



-ss- 



Director Fred J. Sievers gave an inter- 
esting talk in Assembly on Tuestlay morn- 
ing, November 8. His subject was 
"Agriculture and Its Future in America." 



The Dean's Board list resembled a 
catalogue list of the members of the 
sophomore class. . . Mental tests do not 
lie! . . . Although the position of king of 
Dean's Board was cinched by a soph, 
there was a dozen runners up for prime 
minister. . . It is up to the king to choose 
his queen and what a collection to pick 
from! . . . After all, sophomores, this is 
a scientific college and you are not ex- 
pected to appreciate poetry. . . Nobotly 
posted in (ireek! 

— - — ss 

A slump in the patronage of the bowling 
alleys and the pf)ol tables by the fresh- 
men and sophomores always follows the 
j)Osting of Dean's Board. 

— — ss 

At the Colorado School of Mines the 
faculty issuetl an edict that the sopho- 
mores couUl no longer paddle the help- 
less frosh. The sophs, however, easily 
got around this by making the treshman 
padtlle each other for their edification. 
- - -ss — • - 
The ^L1r(x)n and White football team 
boasts of a cr(x)ner in the person of Jim 
Sibson, varsity guard. Jimmy knows the 
words to all the iKipular song hits but as 
yet the tunes always stump him. He 
promised the rest of the boys that he 
would have The AA- American Girl down 
pat for next fall and to be able to sing 
it without getting maroon in the face. 
— -— ss~ — 



^ 
^ 



®n an^ off tbc "Row 



^ 
^ 



There was no outstanding event this 
week. The Row went home this week to 
do its dirty work. 



Members of the Phi Zeta sorority 
have volunteered to act as ushers at 
the S(x:ial Union during the coming 
season. 



Extra! Sigma Beta Chi petitions Sigma 
Phi Epsilon to become national. Note: 
S.B.C. is a local in Kansas. 



To the members of the three \\\\n-x 

classes at Massachusetts. 
Dear friends: 

1 have owed you for some tin.. „„ 
apology, and I wish now to dischargi- the 
debt. Last year, when the Red Cross 
made a drive on the campus to aid the 
distressed mine workers in the soutlurn 
states, I six)ke to you from the platlorni 
of Bowker Auditorium urging you to 
give generously for a worthy cause, | 
have since found out that the striking 
miners received no part of that nlicf, 
but were treated and are still iiiing 
treated as rebellious serfs because, in 
this presumably free country where 
"rugged indi\idualism" is suppcnd to 
prevail, these men dared to pnjtest 
against their condition of virtual peonage. 
Their wages are infinitesimal, their work 
ing conditions intolerable, their living 
conditions like a horrible night mare, 
They are free,- free to starve or die of 
pellagra, they and their wives and 
children; and not one of the great news- 
pa|K'rs of the country dare hint a syllable 
of the iniquity and oppression that tliere 
exists. 

The Red Cross, the great, unselfish, 
noble Red Cross helped only the miners 
who were so stupid and spiritless that 
they submitted to their slavery. Just 
think that over for a moment and you 
will begin to i>erceive its corollaries and 
implications. For every old garment or 
pair of shoes which you gave to the non- 
striking miners would have been unnar^- 
sary if they were paid a living wa^e. In 
fact it was you who were helping to \)d\ 
the wages of these men and till the 
carrion crops of the vultures who prex 
upon them, the profiteering mine owners 
And the strike-breaking Red Cross wa- 
pander to this o<iious transaction. What 
an infernal mockery of the ideals of Clara 
Barton! To what base uses may our 
charity return! Last year I asked your 
help for the miners in the name of Charity. 
Today I ask your pardon in the name of 
Truth. 

Oscar Margolin '.iL' 



Alpha Sig is missing Duke Ring- 
ham who received a leg injury in a 
soccer game that will keep him from 
school indefinitely. 



Walt Kulash, Alpha Gamma Rho's 
own Ponce de Leon, while searching for 
the fountain of Youth under a water 
tank, discovered a rare striped swamp 
angel. 



How would the Coast Guard Kaydets 
look riding horses? . . . One future rum 
chaser said that the next time he played 
on the M.S.C. football field he would 
bring along a tugboat. 



Theta Chi is developing the detec- 
tive instinct. After the vie party 
Friday, one of the boys discovered 
he was estorting some book ends 
home. 



Women, football, and faculty head the 
subjects in bull sessions according to a 
recent list compiled by well-known 
psychologists. 



Kappa Epsilon uses its bath tub for 
many purposes. Rue Norris was assisted 
in washing his monkey suit while he 
was still inside. 



-ss- 



RED CROSS 

Capitalists and militarists may control the Red Cross; we have long sus|jected it. 
But money given to the Red Cross will be used for genuine relief work with probably 
less administrative waste or graft than would be found in many charitable organiza- 
tions. 

It is charged that the Red Cross refuses to aid workers who are striking against 
the despotism of their employers, and gives relief only to those who are slaves enough 
to lie wilting to submit to the i rushing injustice of the cai)italistic rule. There is 
probably a foundation for this charge, but that dcK-s not alter the fa< t that the Red 
Cross is jx-rforming a fine service in efficiently giving relief to some of the people 
who are desfierately in need of it. 

Half of the money collected in the current drive goes to the Red Cross, while the 
other half goes to make up a fund for local unemployment relief. This money is to 
be used, not as a dole, hut i.i providing work. One of the plans for the use of this 
money includes the lonstruction of a walk from the chemistry building to the wait- 
ing station, and from there southward along the west side of Pleasant Street. The 
money would all be usetl for labor, the materials being paid for from other sources. 
This plan for temporary relief seems to be altogether sound and practical and 
deserving of support. The aim of the Red Cross seems also to be a worthy one— as 
far as it goes. 



Th.- students in Pat's English were 
treated to a vocal rendition o la V'allee of 
"Drink to me only with thine eyes." The 
soph got along great until he came to the 
last few lines when he got Maine's Stein 
.Song mixed with Mr. Jonson's words. 



The only one to be fined at Kappa 
Sigma's house inspection was the 
house president. 



Owing to the arrival of the Essex 
.Aggie football team at the Q.T.V. house 
Thursday, Shorty Savaria shared Red 
Mulhall's bed. Both are still displaying 
scars. 



FIRST SOCIAL UNION 

TO BE HELD TONIGHP 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

age-long tortured soul of mighty Russia. ' 

— Le Figaro, Piim 
"Mr. Walevitch's readings were al- 
most as dramatic as the songs themselves. 
He uses his voice with impressive dra- 
matic effect. The songs come directly 
from life itself, and they are a first haml 
interpretation." 

- Boston Flvening Tnniscnp: 
"Saveli Walevitch sang in the (.rami 
Avenue Temple three generous groups of 
Russian folk songs- songs created out of 
the sweat and blood and desire of a 
peasantry without thought of artistn 
success. Each of the songs is a musical 
expression of a mood, a situation, or jwr- 
haps a wish. He sang the song of the 
passing bird in the wistful voice of the 
lonely lover, the convict's song in the 
hard brazen voice of harder and more 
brazen men." — Kansas City Star, 

•^ -ttotices 1 




-ss- 



The largest class on this campus is 
English 2.'>. Yearly it increases in num- 
bers and according to the latest reports 
obtained last Saturday, the professor will 
he lecturing to students in the balcony 
as well as the lower floor of Bowker 
.\uditorium. 



Lambda Chi .Alpha has a new- 
house rule prohibiting gambling on 
.Sunday, thereby giving a much 
needed opportunity for study. 



■ — - — ss — — 
A soph got up too late one morning 
this week to get his breakfast. On that 
morning his military class went for a 
cross-country ride. The calcavade passed 
by a baker's truck so the soph stopped | 
his horse and bought a couple of dough- ; 
nuts. His hasty breakfast was inter-! 
rupted li\, "Who the h— — told you to | 
get out of line?" ' 



Kappa Sigma has found a Sigma to go 
with Kappa but the d — — cat wouldn't 
stay home. 

A vote of thanks is given to who- 
ever put the bridge across the brook 
near Alumni Field. 

Passion, the quadricycled locomotion 
apparatus of Ben Cummings served so 
nobly in the Hort Show that it also 
deserves mention. 



Watch this space. The stork is ex- 
pected on the Row. 



The Bay State Revue is to he held 
Friday, December 2. Any person. >;roup 
or organization desiring to put on an\ 
form of entertainment that (veninf 
should get in touch with either W irren 
Southworth or Frederick Clark. -W 
performance o' any sort will be considered 
All entrances must be in inside of a wee' 
as two rehearsals must be held before 
the event. 

PRE-MEDICAL TEST 

Students desiring to take the Me<l'«J 
Aptitude test must see Dr. Glick on " 
before November 2.-?. The test wdl W 
given on Friday, December 9, in R*"^ 
114, Stockbridge Hall. Any one mf> 
take the test, but a fee of f LO<T ^viH ^ 
charged. ^^^ 

This test is required by W I'l 
medical colleges, and last yen -PP'' ^^ 
mately one thousand student- '" -^ 
hundred premedical colleges took the te- 



•*• 



SPORTS 



* 



♦ 



Booters Defeat Aggies 
Harriers to Run Huskies 



LAST MEET FOR HILL 
and DALERS SATURDAY 

siiurday the Maroon and White 
harrli-rs meet the Northeastern team in 
the last race of the season over the 
Franklin Park course. The Huskies have 
a weak team this year and the State 
team, undefeated as yet in a dual meet, 
slunild be able to capture the honors 

II Crawford's ankle lets him run, the 
time first places should go to State men. 
At the New Englands, the first Husky 
runner to finish was Lamb in Uith i)la»e; 
while Dave Caird came in ninth. Craw- 
ford and Murray, the other two of State's 
first three, were forced to drop out of the 
r.Ke. The next Northeastern man to 
finir.li was their captain, Morang, who 
took the 27th place. Then scattered 
alonj; through the following twenty 
runners were the other five Huskies. 
These same five- C'attley, Stim|)son, 
Kobak, and Rombey — will probably make 
up the rest of the Northeastern team; 
while Statc''s other four will be Crosby, 
.Mien, Keil, and Little. 

The Huskies will have the advantage 
of running over their own course; but 
the State men will know a little af)out 
the (tmrse as it is the same one that 
they ran over in the New Englands. 
Moreover, the Maroon and White men 
will have had twelve days of rest and 
should be in g<Kxl condition to take over 
the Huskies. 



Booters Meet Wesleyan 

Today in Last Game 



State booters will close their 19."12 
season today on the Alumni Field pitch 
where they play the undefeated Wesleyan 
eleven. The Maroon and White team 
has sufTeretl a defeat at the hands of 
.Amherst and will enter the game with 
the odds on the men from Middletown. 

Wesleyan defeated the Conntrticut 
.Aggies in the first game for the Cardinals, 
5-0; then the Little Three champions of 
li'll took Worcester Tech, 2-0. The next 
two games resulted in tied scores — one 
with Brown, 0-0, and the other with 
.Amherst. On last Saturday the Cardinals 
downed Clark, 5-1. The .Maroon and 
White team has not had as successful a 



KOZLOWSK! STARS AS 
STATE TRIUMPHS, 4-0 

Hitting their top stride the State 
booters easily down the men from Con- 
necticut Aggie last Thursday on the 
Alumni Field pitch, 4-0. Three of the 
State scores were made by Bill Kozlowski 
who also passed to Bob Jackson for the 
other goal. 

During the whole game, the Margin 
and White team easily out])layed the 
Storrs booters. For the first time in 
several games, the State team passed 
well and showed an aggressive spirit 
throughout the four (Rrioels. The -Aggies, 
on the other hand, tlisplayed poor team 
work and were inclined to try to star 
indi\ idually. 

State started the game with a bang 
taking charge of the ball from the oin-n- 
ing minutes. Bill Kozlowski, outsi<le 
left forward, kicked the ball into the 
strings for the first s<ore. In the second 
(Rriml, two more- go.ils were chalked up 
when Ko/lowski scored again and also 
made a pass to Jackson for the next. 
The State star forward slip])t'd the last 
one by (ioalie Fields in the early part of 
the third (piarter. 

Several new men were i)ut into the 
game for .State by Coach Larry Briggs. 
Pease, (jeorge. Red WckkI, and Russ 
Taft were new players who took the pla<e 
f»f regulars. Roy Cowing starretl as 
usual for State on tht defensive, while 
Russ Taft and Bill Kozlowski played well 
for the Maroon and White offensively. 



year, having lost to .Amherst, 4-0, an<l 
tied Fitchburg, 1-1. At the first of the 
season. State took W«)rcester Tech, 2-1, 
and Clark, '.i-\. A week ago the Connec- 
ticut Aggies were turned back, 4-0. 

Evidently comparative scores give the 
edge to the Wesleyan team. They have 
a strong defensive combination, with 
Allen, the goalie, being particularly out- 
standing. On the offensive, Talbot, 
White, and Brooks have stCKxl out for the 
Middletown team in their games so far 
this year. State's hopes have risen con- 
siderably since the Connecticut game. 
The team that bowed to Amherst has 
come back, tied Fitchburg. and <lefeate<i 
the Connecticut Aggies by almost as 
large a score as tlie Wesleyan team did. 



RYTEX STATIONARY 

Your name and address on the latest stationery 

S 1 . per box 



A. J. Hastings 



NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



TYPING— Ml MP:0GRAPH ING 
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of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst, Mass. 



HALF PRICE SALE 
WEEK OF NOVEMBER 21st 



GRAND CHANCE FOR CHRISTMA.S GIFTS 



Fiction — Biography — Religious Books— Plays 
Travel — Poetry— Essay.s— Children's Books 

50c Now— FICTION— Formerly $2.50 and $2.00— Now 50c 

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SIH)RTS CALENDAR 



TtiuriMlay, Nov. 17 

Varsity Sikoit. \Ve.<ilt'yan at Mass. State on 

Aluiiiiii hirUl pilrli at H.l,") 
Kre.shniun ami Junior \'arsiiy Cross-country 

teams in squad race at Amherst CoUvkc 

ul 4 ri.m. 
Saturday, Nov. 19 

\arsity Koi.ilnill, Tufls at Tufts Oval lu 

Mi-ilford. 
\'ar»ity t'ross-country. Northeastern in 

Boston. 



^ Zbvw tbc Iknot Ibolc f 

}^H' SIhIT has kicked fi\e points alter 
touchdowns in a rt>w in the l.i»t thiee 
games. Sheff is in fourth |>ositiun among 
the eastern scorers for points after tout h 
downs, having scoretl nine points. 



l.ou Bush, the State stellar halfback, 
is far out in front in the eastern scoring 
race. He has nearly twite as many 
points as his nearest ri\al. Bush, in 
eight g.tmcs has scored I'.t touchdowns 
for 114 jjoints. Pendergast of Man- 
hattan College, is in second place with 
7.{ iMjints. ShelT is in 23rtl place with .'{',• 
points. 



Did you know that l.ou Bush gave a 
talk at the Amherst Boy'> Club last week. 
I.oti's subjei t was "The \'alue of an .Aim 
in Life." Ho hum! 

TEAM RECORDS 

Mass. State TtO Coojmt Union 

Mass. State ft Bowdoin 20 

.Mass. State 13 Middlebiiry t> 

Mass. State 30 Connect it ut Aggies 

Mass. State 2.') Worcester Tech I) 

Mass. State 21 Amherst ft 

Mass. State IS Rensselaer 1.3 

Mass. State 20 Coast (.uartl 13 



Tufts 9 MiddleburyO 

Tufts 14 Bates 

Tufts O Brown 14 

Tufts Bowdoin 

Tiilts 22 Connecticut .Aggie 6 

Tufts 18 Low.'ll T. xtile 7 

Tufts 9 Boston University 9 



CHRISTMAS 
CARDS 

NOW ON SALE 

An early selection means a greater 
variety for choice 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



AIMERS 



Thursday, Nov. 17 

Ricardo Cortez— Karem .Morley 
H. B. Warner — Skeets Gallagher — in 

"PHANTOM OF 
CRESTWOOD" 

Friday, Nov. 18 



ROBERT .MONTC.O.MERV 

TAI.El I.AfI BANKHEAD— in 

"FAITHLESS" 

Saturday, Nov. 19 

Dorothy Wilson— Richard Cromwell 
Arline Judge — l>ic Linden— in 

"AGE OF CONSENT" 

Mon.-Tues., Nov. 21-22 



tTUART ERWIN 

BINO CROtnr 

UILA HWm% 
KATE SMITH 




Wednesday. Nov. 23 

Jack oakie 

in 

"ONCE IN A LIFETIME" 



State Downs Coast Guard 
Battle Tufts Saturday 



HEAVY JUMBO ELEVEN 
HAS STRONG OFFENCE 

With an iiiipressi\'e record of seven 
victories and one defeat. Coach Mel 
laube's Massachusetts .State College 
v.irsity fiHttbali I'lt-vi-n will joiirne\' to 
Medft>rd November 19, to pia\' its 
(tltjr(tive g.inie with a strong Tufts 
("olU'gf combine. A win over this yi-ar's 
Jumbo team, considered by many tin- 
best eleven in the history of Tufts, will 
award the champicmship of the New 
England small colleges to Massachusetts 
St.ite. It is the first time since the 
loiuuling of the collegf, that the MariKtn 
.ind White eleven of Massichust-tts 
■State College have had such an excellent 
opitorf imity to gain glory on the gridiron 
by winning tlu- small t-ollege < hampion 
ship and Coach Taube will semi his 
•ithletcs on tin- fuhl m-xt .Saturday t^ager 
and contidtnt of \ictory. 

The Tufts College ele\en is coached 
by Lew Manly, one of the most noted 
football coaches in New l\nglan<l, and he 
has iiiitiildcd together a powt-rful Jnmixt 
eleven with a sjieedy attack and a stilf 
defense. Tufts opt-ned the season with a 
9(1 vittory over Middlelniry, a team 
which Massachusetts State tlefeated 13-0. 
In its sfcond contest, Tufts playe<l great 
f(K)tball to overwhelm a fighting eli-ven 
from Bates College, a team which hail 
electrified the nation by lutlding \n\v to 
a M-orthss tie on the pre\ ions Siiturd.ty, 
and piJimded out a 14-0 win. Ikown, 
one of the few undefeated teams in the 
east, trounced Tufts, 14 <). Bowdoin, 
the only team that has di-feated .Massii- 
chusetts State this year, could not s«'ore 
against the Jumbo eleven and the g.ime 
en<l«d in a woreless tie. Tufts came 
back again into the ranks of the tri- 
umphant in its fifth <'Ofitest when it 
(let isi\fly beat Connetticut Aggie, 22 <i, 
although the Connecticut combine scoretl 
its only tout hdown of the year in this 
game. State defeated Con.i. .Aggie .39-0. 
Lowell Textile, an indieateii team, suc- 
cumbed before the Jumbo attack and 
was overcome IK 7. Last Sitiirday, 
lufts just barely ekftl out a tie with 
iioston University in a well-pl.iyed game, 
9-9, with ("layman luKttiiig a fiehl goal 
in the last minute of play to tie iIk' 
Terrier eleven. 

The captain of the Tufts eleven is Dan 
("ochrane, a light but clever gu.irtl. 
Tufts has only two seniors on its st.irtiiin 
elfven against Massjichusetts State, Co 
< hr.iiic and Cl.iymaii. Ci.i> ni.in, the 
(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 2) 



MOUNTAIN INJURED 

IN HARD, FAST TILT 

Although I'liciJimtering still (tp|H)8ition 
Irom an unexpectedly strong Coast 
(iii.ird .Ac.ult'iny combiiu", ("oach Mel 
r.Mibc's Mass.ichusitls State College 
elfven finally tlownetl thf naval team, 
20 1.3, in a h.iid fought tilt on Alumni 
I'ield last Siiturd.iy. The M.iriMHi and 
White victory was a costly one. however, 
for I)a\c Mitunt.iin, d(|iendable left end, 
re( ei\ ed a fat iai injury anil w .is removed 
to the House of Mercy Hospital in 
Springfifld for an oin-ration. 

I'or most of the first [M-rioil neither 
team's olfi-nsive functioiii'il very well but 
ne.ir the close of the ipi.trter Coast 
(in. lid leiovt'ied a fiimblr li\ l.ou Bush 
on the State l.'i y.ird line. ,\fter the 
Maroon and White forward had yielded 
but nine yards in three ilowns, the naval 
team attempted an aerial, whith was 
grounded in the end zone. On the first 
play, Coast (iuani broke through the 
.State line and bliMked Coburn's punt, 
till- State fullback reio\iring the ball on 
the one-yanl line. Coburn then biioted 
tin- pigskin to the Slate 4t) yard line. In 
the second |K>riod, after sevt-ral unsuc- 
cessful thrusts at the State line, Ctwst 
(uiard punted to Bush, who c.iriied the 
ball to the State 40 yard line. On the 
next play Bush raced 35 yards arountl 
Coast (iuard right entl before he was 
tackleil on the Middies 2.''> yard mark. 
Joe ShelT ilrop|K'il back and hurled a 20- 
yard forwarti pass to Bush, who scain- 
IM-reil across the goal line for the first 
State score. Shell biMtteil the extr.i |»oint 
successfully. The Tauliemen sc.oretl again 
Itefori the closi- of the second ipiarter. 
with Shelf lugging the ball over the line. 
After successive plunges by Bush, .ShofT, 
and KriK^ird h:id placeil the ball on the 
Coast (lUard Ovarii line. Bush fumbleil 
the leather and ShefT recovered the ball 
behind the line of si rimmage and liani< 
niereil his way through the Middies for- 
ward wall for the seronil .MasKuhusetts 
State touthdown. Slu-IT again converted 
his attempt for the extra |K)int. 

.After half of the third (tericMl had 
elapsed without either eleven scoring, 
Lou Bush finally downed a short kick 
l)> T'orney, Coast (iuard halfback, on the 
nav.il team's 2(i yard line. Slate at- 
tempted two running plays with little 
success ;inil then White, State halfback, 
s(|uiriiieil his way through the center of 
the (V>ast (>uard line and sprinted '2ft 
yards for tin- final Sl.itr s< ore. Sievers 
(ConllnuetJ on I'aftr 4, <k>luinn 3) 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1932 



BURBERRY COATS 

Burberry materials maintain an equable temperature in all climates, from Poles to the 
Equates, and exclude wet more efficiently than any other woven fabric. 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



NEWS FROM CAPTAIN SUMNER 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

whom the Jmlrx, thf t:()lli-Ke yearbook, 
was ile.licated. This gesturi of student 
appreciation was not only in approval of 
the Captain's work as band iea<ler and 
as a true friend of the college, but als<j 
in reco^jnition of his proficiency as a 
composer. The ever popular J'inlil, 
Afassiidtusi'tts, which is considered liy 
many as one of the most spirited colk^;e 
football sonjjs in the country, and which 
was first publicly performed by the 
famous I). S. Army liaMl in a concert 
given on campus two years ago. is of 
his composition, both words and nmsic. 
This piece has been played by the Army 
Hantl over the radio and before the 
President of the United States, as a 
much-admired selection in the repertoire 
of Captain William J. Stannard, director 
of this worhl famous organization. Mit.ssa- 
chusctts State March, a piece written by 
the Captain in dedication to tlie new 
spirit which came in with the change of 
the college name, has also stirred up 
considerable comment, and is to be 
played soon by the present college band. 
Captain Sumner was also instrumental 
in completing band arrangements of the 
Alma Mater, When Twilight Shadtnvs 
Deepen, and several other college songs. 
He was in constant demand as toast- 
master at college rallies and was always 
ready to foster college spirit. His many 
admirers and friends wish him the l)est 
of luck in his return to Fort Riley, and 
hope that he will visit Amherst again 
with his charming wife and children. 



RELIGIOUS CONFERENCE TO 

BE HELD NOV. 20 TO 22 
(Continued from Pafte 1 ) 

for the conference. He said: "I want to 
take up the various phases of human life 
in which the teachings of Christ seem to 
expand our hoiK-s of achievements. It 
will be an aflirmative restatement of the 
l)ower of Christ to provide the more 
abumlant life." For the theme of his 
addresses, Kev. Clausen has chosen the 
title of one of his own books, ' The 
Miracle of Me." 

On Suntlay morning. November 21). the 
c<mference will begin at the regular clia|K'l 
service. Kev. Clausen will speak on the 
theme of the conference "The Miracle of 
Me" or "What Christ Can Do for Per- 
sonality." Sunday evening, in Howker 
auditorium the conference will continue 
when the leader s|)eaks on "The Lost 
Path" or "The Power that Protects Me." 
"The Fate of Frankenstein" is the title 
of Monday's address by Kev. Clausen. 



HEAVY JUMBO ELEVEN 

HA.S STRONC; OFFENSE 
(Continued from I'afte 3) 

Jumbo KiO-pound (juarterhack, is a 
sens;itional l)all carrier and kicker, and 
in the Connecticut Aggie contest he 
received the o|)eniiig kickotT and racetl 
eight yards through the entire Connecti- 
cut team for a touchdown. Clayman is 
leading the eastern colleges in field goals, 
having booted three successfully this 
season. Clayman was the hero of the 
lk)Ston U.iiversity game last Saturday 
for he kicked a field goal from the 25-yard 
line to tie the Boston University eleven, 
<)-'.». Also, in the first quarter of the 
Terrier contest, Clayman burled a suc- 
cessful r)2-yard pass to Vagjian, who was 
tackled on the Boston University H-yard 
line. Clayman is in :i4th position in the 
eastern scoring race with .'55 jx)ints. 

Johnny Parkhurst, regular center, and 
Pat Clark, veteran fullback, were injurcMl 
in the earlier part of the season and have 
returned to the Jumbo team. However, 
both Clark and Parkhurst will not start 
the State game because of the splendid 
showing by Ben Carlyn at center, and 
Walter Froehlich at fullback in the last 
three games. Tufts' giant tackles. Wood- 
worth and Batchelder, have come through 
the entire season unhurt and will be in 
the starting lineup. The Tufts backfield 
averages 171 pounds, the heaviest set of 
backs State has faced this year, while the 
Jumbo forward wall has an average of 
172 pounds. 

Coach Mel Taube will start his strong- 
est combine against Tufts Saturday, 
with the single exception of Dave Moun- 
tain, injured left end. Tikofski. a sopho- 
more, who played a stellar game against 
Coast C.uard, will be at the left wing for 
State. Captain Dan I.eary, Ben Cum- 
mings, Joe ShefT, Mo White and Birkford 
will represent Massachusetts State CollcRe 
on the gridiron for the last time in the 
Tufts game. 



ANNUAL STUDENT CHEST DRIVE 
STARTED 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
Lambda Delta Mu Elizabeth Wheeler 

Sigma Beta Chi Marjorie Jensen 

Phi Zeta Janice Munson 

(). T. V. Roderick Cummings 

Lambda Chi Alpha Page Hi land 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Costas Caraganis 

Alpha C.amma Rho William Smith 

Kappa Sigma Alden Hodgcn 

Phi Sigma KaiJpa Carl Clancy 

Alpha Sigma Phi Milton Kibbe 

Theta Chi Donald Chast- 

\ J (;, Fred Dennon and 

Frank Lorrey 
1^ K John Sullivan 

North College Miles Boylan and 

( ieorge Vassos 
South College Milton Snow 

Non-Fraternity Arthur (ireene 

and Edwin StefTek 
When a solicitor approaches you, rc- 
meniber that there is a competition being 
conducted between sororities and fra- 
ternities, two-year and four-year, men 
and women. Help your organization. 



The concluiling address on Tues<lay 
evening is entitled "How to Cet What 
Vou Want" or "The (.ifts That (ireet 
Me." 

These meetings with the exception of 
Sunday Chainl will be held at 7 o'clock 
in Bowker auditorium oii Sunday eve- 
ning, and in the Memorial Hall on 
Monday and Tues<lay evenings. 

The student committee in charge of 
the conference is comjMJsed of Benton 
Cummings, chairman, Robert Abbot, 
Laura Adams, (ieorge Curtis, S;irah 
Peasely, Marion McLaughlin, and Lester 
Williams. 



COLLEGE OFFICIALS 

ATTEND CONFERENCE 
(CoDtlnuad from Paft* 1) 

and colleges are dependent somewhat on 
Federal appropriations. As these appro- 
priations may be reduced by Congress, 
the group will decide what vital functions 
of the college will be sacrificed, if neces- 
sary, to economy. Another problem to 
be studied is what will be done with the 
student who is financially unable to 
attend college now. When normal times 
return, he will be handicapped by lack 
of training and education through no 
fault of his own. Should the state pro- 
vide funds for his education is a question 
now jx-'rtinent." 

Representatives, usually the president 
and dean, from every Land (irant college 
in America are in attendan<e. The ass<j- 
ciation is organized under a president, 
secretary, treasurer and a number of 
standing committees which administer 
the duties of the Associatioi^ Secretaries 
of Agriculture, Commerce, Interior, and 
War will address this year's meeting in 
the Hotel Willard. Uniteil States Com- 
missioner of Education John Copper w ho 
was on the campus last year will also 
ai)pear before the group. 



was penalized five yards and then David 
dove through the Maroon and White 
line for the second Coast Guard score. 
McCaffrey tossed a pass successfully to 
Kea for the extra point and tht game 
ended, State 20, Coast (iuard Hi. 

Captain Leary, Ryan, and Tikofski, 
featured in the State line while liush. 
White and ShefT played capably in the 
Massachusetts backfield. 

COMPARISON OF JAPENESE 

AND AMERICAN COLLEGES 
(Conttnuad from Paft* 1) 

turc have a club group which meet at 
regular intervals. Harmonica and mando 
lin orchestras are popular, and concerts 
are frequently held. But fraternity and 
radical groups are frowned upon and do 
not exist at the Chiba College. In the 
matter of athletics all the sports which 
are common in America are popular in 
Japan, but there are very few inter- 
collegiate contests, comp^'tition for the 
most part being held during a physical 
festival which lasts about two weeks. 
However, among the larger colleges of 
the Tokio University there is a five team 
league of baseball teams. Contrary to 
the wild enthusiasm which the American 
student has for football, the Japanese 
students prefers baseball. In the winter 
skating, basketball, and skiing is in vogue. 
Another event which is looked forward 
to by the students is the flower festival. 
During this time the students vie with 
each other in decorating their rooms, and 
prizes are awarded to those which are 
most attractive. 



BRILLIANT HORT. SHOW 

ATTRACTS 7000 VISITORS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

the show by the department of Floricul- 
ture. Competitions in vases of large 
flowered chrysanthemums, basket and 
vase arrangements of small flowered 
chrysanthemums, dish gardens, corsages, 
and table decorations were open to both 
four year and two year students and 
many creditable displays were entered. 

Apples from the college orchartls, from 
nearb> growers, anrl samples from various 
states all over the union were exhibited 
by the Pomology department. A minia- 



ture of a modern packing plant pro\nl of 
interest, and the feature of the exhibit 
was a large "M" formed in boxed apples 
antl set high above the rest of the display. 

In the exhibit of the dep)artment of 
Olericulture, a miniature truck farm with 
a home, barns, a roadside stand, patkinu 
house, and fields attracted much atten- 
tion. The display of vegetables was in 
the form of a roadside stand. A disi>lay 
of products from the department of 
Horticultural Manufactures showed the 
uses to which fruits and vegetables are 
adapted, as well as the varied preserved 
foods which may be prepared from given 
amounts of such common products as 
apples, cranberries, tomatoes, and onions. 

Exhibited by the Botany departnunt 
were the results of experiments in the 
use of jK)rous and nonporous containers 
for potted plants. Bees and their pro- 
ducts were shown by the department of 
Entomology. A general store in the 
balcony sold cut flowers, apples, < ider, 
and doughnuts to visitors. 

First prize in rose displays went to 
Montgomery rose growers, from S<iuth 
Hadley who showed, for the first time in 
public, a beautiful new seedling rose of 
an unusual orange color. The new rose 
will not be ready for distribution until 
1934, and it is an honor to Massachusetts 
State College that it should be first 
shown here. Other exhibitions of roses 
were shown by Butler and Ullman of 
Northampton, and t)y Pierson of Crom- 
well, Connecticut. 

Michael Connor of the M.S.C. green- 
houses, took many prizes in the compe- 
titions in exhibition chrysanthemums. 
The cup for the best of these huge chry- 
santhemums was once again won hy 
"Doc" after several years in which he 
has l)een forced to take second place. 

This has been the largest horticultural 
show put on by the college since it be- 
came an annual event in HM)8. Much 
credit is due to the student workers 
whose efforts made the exhibition a suc- 
cess. The experience gained predicts an 
even better show next year with promise 
of further co-operation from students and 
outside exhibitors. 



M.S.C. MENS MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"Let Dave doit'' 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



Typing 

First Class Work Low Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sift" House 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 
North Amherst 



Everything in Hardware 

and Radio Equipment 

— PHILCO= 



MOUNTAIN INJURED IN 

H.\RD, FAST TILI 
(Continued from Pa£e S) 
failed to kick the extra jxiint. Coast 
C.uard, displaying a powerful aerial 
attack and a strong running offense 
carrie«l the ball down to tin- State 10-yard 
line just before the third i>eri(xl ended. 

David and Lathrop gained seven yards 
on two thrusts at the State line, and then 
Captain David hammered his way through 
the Maroon and White forward wall for 
the touchdown. McCafYery's forward 
pass for the extra \io\nt was grounded. 
With al)out four minutes of the final 
l)eri(Ml remaining. Coast C.uard bewildered 
the State backfield with a deceptive 
passing attack and carried the ball down 
ito the Massachusetts 7-yard line. State 



FISHER'S 

CORDUROY 
SUITS 

Wine, Green, Brown, Navy 

In two styles 
Sizes 14 to 20 

$3.95 



PREPARE FOR COLD WEATHER 

All Wool Blankets for . . . $2.9.1 and up 
Part Wool Blankets for . . . 95c and up 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main SL Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OK 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE PRICES 

Our Laundry Firsi Class 

Our I 'olicy Guarantied 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 
for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, • MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

TH[ MUM PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Collegiate Sport wear for Men and Women 

Riding Habits, Boots, Hiking and Sport Jackets 

We give free carfare with purchases of $5.00 or up 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

14 MAIN STREET 
Between Town Hall and Masonic BuUdinft 

$2.25 
1.50 

MKN'S RUBBER HEELS .40 

LADIES' HALF SOLES and 1 J& 

RUBBER HEELS !•*»' 

LADIES* RUBBER HEELS .30 

LADIES' LEATHER HEELS .25 

All Work Guaranteed 



MEN'S WHOLE SOLES and 

RUBBER HEELS 

MEN'S HALF SOLES and 

RUBBKR HEELS 




THE CANDY KITCHEN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 



SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 



INCORPORATED 



l^ 

"V A CURRENT EVENT IN T* 
^ THE COLLEGIAN ^ 

j[ The Bay State Revue prom- T 
<^ Ue« to be a colorful and *v* 
^ entertaining performance. ws}» 



OUTSTANDINC; EVENT 
or THE WEEK 



Vol. XLIII 




I.ouU Buiih waa announced 
hy I he Aknotialed Press a« 
the undUpuled king In the 
tiutionul cullegluie fuolball 
wi'orlnU rui°e with IMpulnlt. 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1932 



Number 9 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 
TO HEAR RT. 
REV. McCONNELL 



Famous Educator to Address Student 
Body 



Kt. Rev. Francis John MiConiioil, 
|).l)., Bishop of the Methotlist K|)istopal 
Church, will speak at Sunday Chapel on 
IVreinber 4, in Bowker Auditorium. 
Aftir ^riiduatiiig from Ohio Wesleyan in 
1,S>(4, Bishop McConnell received his 
I'h.I). from Boston University in 1899, 
and the degree of D.D. from Ohio Wes- 
leyan in 1905. and Yale in 19.'i0. He al>w> 
received his LL.D. from Yale and Boston 
I'liiversity. 

Among the Metho<list pastorates which 
he held from 1894 to 1909 are the follow- 
ing: Newton Upper Falls, Mass.; Ip- 
swich, Mass.; Cambridge, Mass.; and 
Brotiklyn, N. V. 

After serving as president of DePauw 
I'niversity from lt»(K)-12, Bishop Mc- 
Connell was elected in succession: Bishop 
of M.E. Church, President of Religious 
Kducation Association, and President of 
the Federal Council of Churches of 
Christ in America. In addition to these 
activities, he was Lyman Beech lecturer 
at Vale in 1930 and an honorary trustee 
of Chataqua Institution. 

.Among his publications are: Religious 
Certainty, The Increase of Faith, Under- 
>lamhnii the Scriptures, Living Together, 
The Christ-Like God. 

FRVIT JUDGINGTEAM 
ON WAY TO VIRGINIA 

To Compete in Eastern Intercollejtiate 
Contest 



CENTENNIAL MEETING 
HELD AT NEW YORK 



Participating for the sixth consecutive 
\i-.ir in the Eastern Intercollegiate Fruit 
Judging Contest, the State College fruit 
judging team left tixlay for the Univer- 
sity of West Virginia. 

Professor Arthur French of the Po- 
mology department accompanied the 
team which is composed of T. H. Powell 
j:>. Lawrence Southwick ".ill. Nelson 
Wheeler '34, and an alternate. Other 
s< hools, participating in the contest are: 
Rutijers University, University of Mary- 
land, Pennsylvania State College. Ohio 
State University, and the I'niversity of 
West Virginia. 

The University of West Virginia is 
lociitifl in Morgantown. 



Dean Muchmer Tells of Conference 
of Kducaturs 

"According to Thomas I amont. the 
students of t(xla> are the prcxlucts of the 
war. the treaty of Versiiilles, inflation, 
uui the depression," said Dean Machmer 
u|)oa his return from New York, recently, 
where he attended a "conference of 
Universities." The conference was held 
under the auspices of New York Univer- 
sity at the- Waldrof- Astoria Hotel on 
November 1"), lt», and 17. 

One hundred years ago in 18.'J1-18.{2, 
New York University was founded and 
at its opening, a conference of the edu- 
cational leaders of the world was held t«j 
determine the aims, ideals, and pur|K)ses 
of such a University as N.Y.U. After a 
century «*f existence, another conference 
was called by the s;iine university to re- 
view the achievements of the past, to 
note the vast changes in the sfx-ial order, 
and to plan the educational future. 

Represi'ntatives from the leading uni- 
versities and colleges of thirty-two na- 
tions were invited to this conference as 
well as leaders in the fields of commerce, 
|>ulitics, and art. The conference was 
opened Thursday evening on the 18th 
floor of the hotel. The subje<t matter 
to be discussed at the conference was 
dividetl into four sections. On Tuesday 
the first section was discusse<l, "The 
University Today: Its Aims and Pro- 
vince." Speakers on this topic included 
President .Xngell of ^'ale, President 
Coffman of the University of Minnesota, 
and Sir John Irving, Principal of St. 
Andrews University in Stotland. 

Section II was entitled "The Univer- 
sity and Economic Changes." Mr. 
Thomas Lamont, financier, who |)reside<l 
ixiintetl out that t<Mlay's students are the 
(Continued on Page 4, Column i) 

Exhibition of Pictures 

in Memorial Building 

Pictorial Photography Shown 



PHILHARMONIC CONCERT 

Issay Dobrowen. Russian guest artist, 
will conduct the radio concert to be 
heard in the Memorial Building at 3 p.m. 
Sunday. The program includes the 
Ft haikovsky symphony, preceded by 
''linka's overture to "Russian and Lud- 
milla," LiadofT's "The Enchanted Lake" 
and "Kikimora" and Strauss's "Death 
ind Transfiguration." 



INDEX NOTICE 

'students who have snapshots they 
«i>!i published in the 1934 Index must 
lea\e them at the Library desk before 
IX'xmber C. All snapshots will be 
Pin -< ,1 in a contest, the winners of which 
' published. 



WHAT ARE YOU WORTH? 

i'trnard Clausen says: "Chemical 

ex|>(rts have discovered that the average 

"lan who is .5 feet 10 inches in height and 

^'"'- )? I.tG pounds, contains just enough 

it r seven bars of soap, enough iron 

'^ > ten-penny nails, enough salt to 

~' ' 1 one hard boiled egg, enough sugar 

'"^ < cup of coffee, enough lime to 

ish one medium-sized chicken 

'^J"i' and enough sulphur to rid one 

Pomeranian dog of fleas. This whole 

«>llection of junk is worth just 98 cents. 

•^'xts-six cents a hundred pounds, on the 

1"^"" as is, F.O.B. Syracuse. New York. 

rse the only real objection to a 

^^"'Pntation like that is its untruth. . . 

on are not worth what you would 

"■■'"K as beef." 



Mwlern pictorial photography was the 
subject of the exhibition on the walls cjf 
the Memorial Building during the past 
two weeks. This exhibition consisted of 
fifty photographs by individual artists 
and selected from current exhibitions by 
a committee of experts, and circulated 
by the American Federation of Arts, in 
Washington, D. C. The exhibition was 
arranged for this campus by Professor 
Frank A. Waugh. 

These i)ictures gave a gcxxl oppor- 
tunity to estimate the artistic advance of 
modern photography. They were a 
revelation to many who assumed that 
the camera is useful mainly for making a 
scientific record. The "art" value of 
these pictures will hardly be denied by 
anyone, even though some of the sub- 
jects are not universally pleasing. In 
the study of p.ittern, light, and shade, the 
camera has obvious advantages and it 
was well exemplified in this exhibition. 

TAKES FIRST PLACE 
IN JUDGING CONTEST 

Fruit Judges Win New England Trial 

Mass. State College's Fruit Judging 
Team took first place at the New Eng- 
land Intercollegiate Fruit Judging con 
test at Durham. .N. H.. November 19. 
The work of Townsjnd Powell '33 in 
taking first place gave the team a de- 
cisive lead. 



Ttams Perfect Srorf 

\. Massachusetts State Cot IrRp 
2. Connecticut Agrirultiiral ( olleKe 
.'J. I'niversity of New llampstiirc 
4] University of Maine 



ndividuals 

1. T. H. Powell 
H. Kunze 
Danielson 
N. A. Wlietfler 
G. Oilman 
L. Southwick 
H. Haien 
Brockett 
C. Ordway 
G. OsRood 
S. Hallgren 
W. Cloutier 



Perfect Score 

M.S.C. 



12 



(AC. 
C.A.C. 
M.S.C. 
r. of N.H. 
M.S.C. 
U. of N.H. 
C.A.C. 
I -.of N.H. 
f.of M. 
V. of M. 
U. of M. 



1727 
17i:j 
1672 
1.'.20 

O'X) 
."jH.'i 
.'i82 
.->S() 
'tl't 
.WJ 
.567 
.5.V> 
.').-> 1 

TAfi 

.'ill 
46.} 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



.1// the world's a fnu<< 0/ /iJ/y, 
Voulh ij gay. ane metan/hoty: 
Youth is spendittg, .i.i;*' iv thrifty, 
Mad at tvenly, cti.l at fifty; 
Man IV nauiiht hut folly's slave, 
trum the cmdle to the urave. 

-H //. Irdamt 

Mojftn Shif of Fools 

Thuriiduy, Dec. 1 

7. .it) Collctii.in Coin|K>tition 
Frlduy, l>ec. i 

7.()0 p.m. State College Revue 
Saturduy, l>ec. i 

2.1)0 p.m. W.S.G.A. Tea, Memorial Bldg. 
Sunday, Dec. 4 

«J.(K) a.m. ChaiH'I. Bishop McConnell. 
Bowker Auditorium 

3.(N) p.m. Radio Concert, Memorial BIdg. 
Monday, Dec. 5 

H.tK) p.m. Gl<-e Club 

TueMlay, Dec. 6 

S.UO p.m. Chorus 

Wednesday, Dec. 7 

.'t '.10 p III Astemhly, Dean Brown 
K.OO i).m. Orchciitra 



Debate to be Given 

This Sunday Evening 

Meeting to Be Held in First Clungre- 
gational Church 

That higher education should be re- 
stricted to students of exceptional ability 
is the resolution that the debating society 
will argue at the First Congregational 
Church in Amherst. 

The aflirmative premise of the question 
is that the present system is detrimental 
to the individual and to society and that 
the new methcMJ of restriction would give 
better results for the individual and 
society. The negative side will attempt 
to prove th.it the present s\stem is Immu-- 
ficial to both the individual and stxiety 
ami that the new method would be detri- 
mental. 

Each team will be composed of two 
memlR-rs. The affirmative team is cap- 
tained by Ralph Hcxttrand the negative 
by Nathaniel Mill. .Ml students are in- 
vited t«) attend the debate which will In- 
held at 0.30 o'clo<:k. Refreshments will 
be served l)efore the debate. 

NEWMAN CLUB TO MEET 

This evening at eight o'chxk, the 
Newman Club will hold its first big 
meeting of the year in the .Memorial 
liuilding. The meeting will be o(>ened 
with a sjjeaker. William C. Monahon. 
Mr. .Monahon, who was origin lily sihed- 
uled to speak in January is taking the 
place of Lawyer James C. Ilafey of 
Chi<-o{>ee who is unable to be here be- 
cause of illness. It is ho|)ed, however, to 
have Mr. Hafey in January. Dancing 
an<l bri<lge. inters|)ersed with refresh- 
ments are planned for the remainder of 
the evening. 

A committee consisting of Wilfred B. 
Be<lord, Daniel J. Foley, Nancy E. Russell 
and Margaret C. .McMahon is in charge 
of the affair. 



.Massachusetts State College was the 
first college in the country to organize a 
separate dei)artment of florii ulture. This 
was started in nH)8. 

Massachusctt.i State College was the 
first college in the United .States to build 
a glass plant house of commercial size 
for instruction purjxtses. This house was 
erected in IKO? and is still in use. 

Egg production in commercial pf)ultry 
flfxks in M.issjichu.setts has increased 
.'!.'» |)cr< ent in the last 20 years. 



Isadorc Rabinowitz of the class of 
1!).3() dierl of bhxxl poisoning at his 
home in llolyoke on NovemlM-r 10. 

Previous to November .'), Rabino- 
witz complained of illness and was 
attended by I)<k tor Rad .lifT who ad- 
vised him to leave si IhkjI tem(K)r;irily. 
.Accordingly Rabinowtiz returned to 
his home in Holyr»ke on November .">. 
I5!(Kk1 poisoning .set in and he died on 
Werlnestlay, Novemlxr HL 

Isadore kabinf)witz was born in 
Gardner, .Massachusetts, on January 
14. 1014. He was graduaterl from 
Molyrjke High Schwl in 10:{2 ami 
entered the college in September. He 
roomed at 10 Pleasant Street. His 
major was Social Science. 



HELEN KELLER TO 

DELIVER ADDRESS 

Author und Teacher Will Talk to 
Students Next .Sunday 

Helen Adams Keller, famous blind 
author and te.icher, will give an address 
at StiH-kbridge il.dl on Sunday, Die. 11 
at 2.I.") o'l liK k. Miss Keller's apin-arance 
is s|)onsori>d by the Amherst Woman's 
Club. 

Helen Keller has been blind since the 
age of nineteen months and she is now 
W years of age. From the lime when 
she became blind until the present, she 
has l)een educated by Anne Sullivan 
(Mrs. John Macy). In 1004 she received 
the Bachelor of Arts degree from Rad- 
clifT college. At present she is on a 
lecture tour, attempting to raise an en- 
dowment fund of two million dollars for 
the American Koundation for the Blind. 
Henry van Dyke, famous author and 
poet, is chairmin of one of the com- 
mittees of this institution. Calvin 
Coolidge is honorary president of the 
foundation. 

Miss Keder, although deaf has ad- 
dresseil thousands of people in America 
and abroad and she has astounded them 
by her almost miraculous feats. .She is 
able to tell when her audience is laughing, 
applauding, or restless. .She is the author 
of "Optimism," "Out of the Dark," 
"The World I Live In," "The Song of 
the Stone Wall." 

Rev. Clausen Talks 

to Sunday Assembly 

Op«nH Three Day (Conference 

"Every one of you is a miracle in at 
K'ast 7H4 tlilferent ways," declared Dr. 
Bernard C. Clausen of Syracuse, N. Y. 
at the cha|>el exercises held November 20. 
Dr. Clausen's address inaugurated a 
series of four whit h he gave on campus 
during the next three ilays. Dr. Clausen 
is piistor of the hirst Ba|>tist Church of 
Syracuse and has been a |)opular speaker 
here for the past twi) years. 

"It would be easy for me to prove to 
my own satisfai tioii that I am a miracle. 
I am attempting a much more ambitious 
and difficult task thaa that. I intend to 
prove beyond any doubt that you are a 
miracle each one of you. I shall do 
better than that; I shall refuse to be 
siitisfied until I have made you believe 
that each person within the sound of my 
voice is at least 784 miracles combined 
into one," he siiid. 

"Thank (WkI for your Ixxly. It is a 
machine more marvelous than any which 
purr under the h(x>ds of your motor 
cars," the speaker continued. "I h.id to 
live through a war to fiml out the use- 
fulness of my haniL But its usefulness is 
wholly de|H"nrlent u|M)n the remaining 
f>art of me. Only when one sees it obedi- 
ent is it that the vivifying miraile glori 
fies all that enters into its unity." 

Spe«:ial music was provided by a string 
f|uartette com|M)se<l of Edgar Sorlon '33, 
Edward Harvey '.33. Ralph Henry '.34, 
and Frank Hatstone '.34. 

DEAN BROWN OF YALE 
TO SPEAK AT ASSEMBLY 

Popular Speaker to Be Heard Next 
Week 

Dean Brown of the Vale Divinity 
Sihool uill be the speaker at the ass«-mbly 
on Wednewlay. Decc-njber 7. He is a 
f)owerfui lecturer and is in great demand 
to give Sunday a<ldress«;s as his topics are 
mostly of a religious nature. S<j desire- 
able is he as a S[H-akcr that his engage- 
ments are made three years in ailvance 
and in order that he may give siifTu ient 
time to his lecturing, it h;is been necessary 
for him to resign his position as i)resident 
of the Yale Divinity S< h<K>l. 

For s(?vcral years he has been numlK-red 
among the visiting speakers on this atm- 
pus anrl each year he has l)ecn considered 
one of thrwe most [Ktpular with the stu- 
dents. Jurlging by the interest with 
which he has been met in previous years 
I he is guarantei^l an enthusiastic audience 
this year. 



90 STUDENTS TO 
TAKE PART IN BAY 
STATE REVUE 

Unusual EntertainniiMit Pronii.scd 
for .\nnual .Sho\% 

The 10.32 edition of the Bay State 
Revue, sponsored by the Roister Doisters 
as one ot the Six i.il Union events of the 
term and scheduled for presentation at 
7 p.m.. Friday evening, December 2, at 
Bowker Auditorium, promises to be t»nc 
of the most entertaining and complete 
revues of student talent ever seen on 
tanipus. .\ cast of over '.»() stuilent |H>r- 
formers, culled from the student bixly by 
virtue of musiial. dramatic and athletic 
prowess, and under the direction of 
Warren Southworth '34, president of the 
Roister Doist>-rs, and Frederic Clark "M, 
manager of the same organization, will 
appear with a variety of entertainment. 
Highlights of the program, which is at 
present merely tentative, include presen- 
tations by the College Orchestra under 
the baton of Kdgar .Sorton '33, several 
group and solo dances, one-act plays, 
instrumental novelties, and appearances 
by the campus dance orchestra, the newly 
formed glee club, and the College Hanil, 
with (Kcasional seleitiors by a men's 
ijuartet. A wrestling bout v^ill represent 
the athletic phase of campus life, while 
sorority present. it ions will show the cam- 
pus i-o ed in her collegiate environment. 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 

RECORD A TTENDANCE A T 
CLAUSEN CONFERENCE 

Mr. Barnard Rises to Criticize at 
Last Session 

"The power of Christ to provide the 
more abundant life" was the theme n( the 
three day conference held here from 
NovemlM-r 20 to 2.3 under the leadership 
of Rev. Bernard C. Clausen of the First 
Baptist Chunh in .Syracuse. N. Y. The 
confereme attracted more student inter- 
est than anything else of its kind has for 
many years, with an average attendance 
of about 400 at the meetings. The climax 
came during the question and answer 
period of the last session when Ellsworth 
Barnard, instructor of English, mounted 
the platform In-fore an audience which 
completely fij|(.«| the floor of Bowker 
Auditorium to ask three questions, and 
delivered a sensational speech in biting 
criticism of Rev. ( lausen until he was 
stopped by Robert D. Hawley. Secretary 
of the College, who was chairman of the 
meeting. 

On .Sunday morning Kev. Clausen 
s|Mjkc on "The Mir.u li- of Me." outlining 
the wonders of the human b«»«ly and 
s.iying that Christ worked through a benly 
like ours, but though that w.is now dead, 
he still lives ami moves as one of the 
greatest powers in the world tiKlay. 

.S|Making on "The Lost Path," on 
Sunday evening, Rev. Clausen said that 
the way to divine |Mmir and protection 
is throiigli pr.iyer. He s;nd, "Prayer is 
the i>ath to 'the seiret pl.ace of the most 
high,' which is kept set ret. not from us, 
bill Jor us." 

Attempting to arouse the students 
from ;i false sense of security, on Monday 
evening the s|Kaker depicted the three 
biggest Frankenstcins which will threaten 
the sliidf III when lit leaves the "cloisteretl 
fConlinued on Pufte 4, Column 1) 

SLMMY CHAPKL SPEAKERS 

FOR HIE WIM ER TERM 

January K Dr. ( larem i- A B.irbour, 

President, Brown U'niversitv 
January l."> Rev. J. Paul Uilli.ims. 
January 22 Dr. Hugh Black, I'nion 

Thetilogii .il .S»-miriary. 
January 2««'' Professor llarohl i:. H. 

S|)eight, Dartmouth. 
February ."> Open. 
February 12 0|>en. 
February 10 Rev. Sidney Lovett, Mt. 

Vernon Church, Bostim. 
February 20- Rev. J. Elliott Ross. 
March r> Rev. William P. Schcll. 
March 12()|)en. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1. 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1W2 



I 







/BbaggacbivsilP^^ ^roUegtan 



Official newspaiHM- of the Massachusttts State College, Published every 
Thursday by th;- students. 



BOARD Ol- EDITORS 

VV. Raymond Ward '33 

Edilnr-iH-Ckief 



EUCBNt GURALNICK '33 
Managing i.diUir 



Alfreda L. Ordwav "33 
AiiotiaU Editor 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 

Editorial 

W. Raymond Ward '33 

Campu. Athletic 

Raymond Royai. '34. mi^ KT™ "Jr" 'M 

Alfrbda L. Ordway '33 Silas Littub. jr. jo 

Ruth D. Campbell '34 

Harrietts M. Jackson '34 

Mary L. Allen 'Zf> Fx.hafHJes 

^r..^.Tr^ri:^^o. -^ ^ alkreoa' -"'orwAY -33. £.... 

Featura 

Stanly F. Sepkrski '34 



5rAr/€ 



Theycallidher" Relativity" foralthou^;h 
she c()nii)Utely filled the three well-known 
dimensions, length, breadth, and width, she 
overflowed into the fourth. 
»s 

During the past few bitter cold morn- 
ings several of the fraternities have ap- 
pointeil various brothers to get up fre- 
quently during the night and see that 
no one has frozen to death, for nature in 
the raw is .seldom mild. 

-88- 



Stochl)vi^Ge ^ 

Tlie annual Stoekbridge .Mumni Asso- 
ciation liaiKjtiet \\ill be iield this year at 
the Stone Haven in Springfield on Satur- 
<lay eve ling, December ."5. .\bout loO 
alumni are expected for the dinner and 
dancing. 




Edward J. Talbot '34 

Advtrlising Manager 

Frank Batstone '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. Gurney '33 

Business Manager 



Business Assistants 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Manager 

W. Lawrence Schenck '34 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



« 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be receiver! by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. . 

Entered as second-class matter at the A.nherst Post Office. Accepted fof njailing at special rate 
Of posuge provi.led for in Section Ua3. Act of October. 1917. authorUed August 20. 1918. 



Twenty- five percent of the Harvard stu- 
dents are said to have bad physical postures 
I'erhaps they got that way trying to comb 
those famous "Hawvahd" hair cuts. 
ss 

Indications of ro-eds at Worcester 
Tech from their school paper, the Presn- 
men-Sophomore football game was played 
on a wet and muddy Alumnae field. 

The women's debating team at Middle- 
bury may have some bearing on the fact 
that five women and only one man was 
elected to Phi Heta Kappa. 
— ss — 

In spite of the result of the recent 
presidential election, some i)eople are 
still trying to find the dollar that Wash- 
ington threw across the Potomac. 



Thomas Q. Harrison of New Jersey, 
speaking under the auspices of the Inter- 
national Relations Clubs, discussed the 
topic "America's Stake in the Far East" 
at Tuesday Assembly. 



Mr. Ralph H. Oatley of Springfield, 
coach of the Amherst College Cleo Club, 
and of the Deerfield Academy Glee Club, 
winner of the eastern preparatory school 
cliampionship in the annual contests in 
the Town Hall, New York City, for the 
p.ist three or four years, has been secured 
to direct the mass singing of the Stock- 
briflge student body for the remainder 
of the term. He will be here for morning 
assemblies on December (J and i:i from 
IJA) to 8.20. If these trial sings work out 
successfully the plan will be c<mtinued 
for the winter term until the IWU class 
leaves for placement training. This new- 
activity may become a regular feature of 
the student assembly program in Stock- 
briclge. 



-88- 




^ ^ ^ EDITORIALS ^ ^ ^ 

A NEW POSSIBILITY FOR ST.VI'E GRAUIJ.VIES 

Believing that any college gra.luat.- wh<. "makes good" in this time of depression 
deserves editorial comment, we print the following letter, recently received by the 
department of Kconomics. History an.l So<iol..«y from I.eo,K.l<l H. Takahashi of the 
class of V.rM. It will be of interest to all stu.lents as showing the type of work done 
by social workers and as Takahashi was the first undergraduate to major in the de- 
partment with the intention of becoming a professional social worker, his success 
may give added stimulus to the many who are now studying for this rapidly expand- 
ing field. 

Before assuming his present duties Takahashi spent two interesting summers in 
settlement camps for miner's children, one in North Carolina and one in West Vir- 
Kinii attended the New York S<h(M>l of Smial S« ience. and conducted investigations 
in the tobacco fields and in the New York City slums. Members of the two upi^er 
classes will remember him as the feature editor of the ColleRian and as literary editor 

of the Index. ■ . , t 

"\ do not recall that I have written you since I got a job with the lemporary 
Emergency Relief .Administration of New York State. I have been working with 
them since the end of September. I began as a .S>,</,i/ Investigator of Home Relief 
cases in the inetro,H)litan area. The work really amounted to making a social audit 
of the way in which relief was given. We took every ninetieth case as a siuiiple and 
visited them to see how the branch offices in the city were doing their job. 

"After a couple of weeks of this I was st>nt out on the road to do the same thing 
in Syracuse. Here I worked with the auditors who did the books while I checked on 
the case work end. Mv title was then changed to .Social Investigator and my salary 
was put on a *150 a month basis. I was also given ^V^ a week in expenses. 

" \fter I hatl been in Syracuse a vouple of weeks, Wayne County decided to accept 
the pnnisions of the Wicks Act so that it could get a 40 perc.Mit reimb.irsement on 
its relief exiK-nditures. The .Administration req.iires that participating cities and 
counties keep a sj)ecial kind of books an.l come up to a minimum standard of case 
work. I was given the job .>f Case Supervisor of Wayne County and told to see that 
the county otfici-ils kept the right sort of books and di.l the rest of the work with at 
least a minimum degree of effectiveness. 

"Setting up the bookkeeping end is not so very difficult although some of the 
local olTicers I have to deal with are not very bright. The hard thing is to try to 
introduce elTeitiNc case work. They are not sure what case work is and are against 
it anywav. Besi.les they figure that it would increase their expenditures whuh it 
probal.lv' would an.l men who keep their jobs of welfare officers because of how 
little they spend are not open to the suggesti.m that they spend a little more in order 

to do a giHxl job. • , . 

"But it is really interestini^ work in spite of the difficulties. I do wish, however, 

that I had had more casework experience. 

■I have hatl the offer of a |K>sition as a case supervisor in the Syracuse Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare, which is (juite an honor." 

MR. BARNARD 

Respect of manv students for Mr. BarnanI as a gentleman seems to haxe been 
considerablv lessened bv his performance at the .lose of the last a.ldress of Rev. 
Bernard Clausen her.- last week. It woul.l be both unkind an.l unnecessary for us 
to review the opinions which have been cir.ulating among the stu.lents regar.hng 
this unf.>rtunate .xxurren.e. Su.-h criticism of Mr. Barnard sh..ws a regretal.le lack 
of svmpathv an.l human kin.lness. 

it is ri.liculous t.. supi...se that anv man in his right senses woul.l be so crude and 
ungentlemanlv as to stan.l bef.,re the stu.lent l.o.ly in the presence of a representa- 
tive of the a.lministrati.Mi and insult a guest ..f the college as Mr. Barnar.l .li.l. We 
can only conclu.k- that Mr. Barnar.l was not in his right senses. No doubt he has 
already'recovere.1 his mental balance. K..r his sake, an.l the sake of his friends, we 

hope so. 

What Mr. Barnard nec.ls is sympathy. n.)t criticism; kindliness, not contempt. 
It W..U1.1 be best to forgive an.l forget the whole matter and hop' that the mental 
balance of Mr. Barnard may not again be disturbed. 



.\ collegiate definition of slang. ".X 
sport nuMlel language stripped .l.)wn to 
get more sjiee.l with less horsepower." 
ss —-- 

This is the time when the mailman is 
bei:oming stoop shouldered carrying the 
outgoing warning cards from the Dean's 
Office. 



-88- 



Rev. Charles H. Cadigan. Rector of 
(".race Episcopal Church and Religi.ius 
.Adviser at Amherst Cillege, spoke at 
the Mon.lay evening meeting of Kolony 
Klub on N.nember 21. This was one of 
a series of student meetings held in on- 
nection with the special program hea.led 
by Rev. Bernard Clausen. 



THE liNDEPENDABIin Y OF RICHES 

"I hif arc just a few lights on the human consequences of the depression: Samuel 
C.alitzka, a Br<x>klyn re.ilty .)j)erat.)r, rate-l as a millionaire .inly a year ago. com- 
mitted sni.i.le and left this n.rte: 'S<ime men die f.>r their country like heroes. I am 
dying bet:ause what little I have left in insur.m.v an.l ..ish is just about sufficient to 
keep mv wife for the rest of her .lays.' 

••In the meml)>-rship .»f one of the most fashionable clubs of a Midwestern city 
there ii.i\e been tliin> lour suicides in the last eighteen months. Perhaps one ought 
not to waste t..o mu. h sympathy .m these milli.maires who cannot a.ljust themselves 
to a new situati.m when so many of the p.>or are starving. Nevertheless, it is rather 
pitiful that our civilizati.m should have pr.xluce.l so many men 'whose Cod is their 

(Continued on Pafte 4) 



The college of to<iay seems to be the 
stamping gr.)und of our mo.lern crusa.lers. 
Business men ome to the college an.l 
declare that the future lea.lcrs in the 
business worl.l will come from the ranks 
.)f the present colk-ge stu.lents. They tell 
the students to stu.ly har.l an.l grind, 
stan.l in the upper thir.l of your class is 
their byw.ml. Religious missionaries 
come to the college looking for mission- 
aries. The w.jrl.l will g<» t.> the dogs if 
the college stu.lent does not watch out. 
They cry out that the churches are de- 
l)en.lent f.)r their future faith carriers on 
the college ranks. Political men .leplore 
the college student's lack of interest in 
the welfare of his c.iuntry. The college 
student will be the gui.ling hands of the 
nations, etc., etc. But what happens? 
While a student is in college everything 
is promise.l to him, but when he gra.luates 
he cann.H even get a job to earn a nickel 
to .Irop in the collection box on Sunday. 

■ ss 

.\ university of Michigai scientist has 
found that the white race stands nearest 
the ape, the mongoloid next, an.l the 
negro furthest away in the factor of 
hairiness. .And still some of our students 
s|X)rt scraggly bristles beneath the open- 
ing to their nasal ca\ity. 

ss 

N.)w that the college football season 
is over, the season for .All-.Ameri.an an.l 
.Alt-Opp.)nent teams is liix-n. If s.)me one 
woul.l only pick an .All-Fraternity Massa- 
chusetts State College team. That woul.l 
be something! 

SS' 

Stu.lents at M.I.T. who participate.l 
in a riot last year are being assesse.l fifty 
cents each to pay for one pair of trousers 
lost by a fireman and to .lefray the 
damage done to fire apparatus. However 
m.)ney will not cover the humiliation of 
losing one's pants. 

ss- 

Twenty-five cars owne.l by Lehigh 
University stu.lents were confiscated and 
.ledarcl as "relics unfit to operate on 
public streets," by the State Highway 
Patrol of Pennsylvania. 

SS-— — 

.A new botanical use has been found 
for the white birch trees on top of Prexy's 
Hill. Several of our nosey freshmen 
entered the sacre.l precincts of a birch 
grove and amusetl themselves by reading 
some of the love messages written on the 
innocent trees. 

ss — — 

Smoking in bed anti other violations of 

the college rules governing the use of 

tobacco, particularly after the curfew, 

led to a warning by Wellesley College 

\ officials that unless the girls cease dis- 

i obeying the regulations they will be 

denie.l the right to smoke in college 

, .lormitories. .After all a bed should be 

slept and not smoked i i. 






®n an^ Off the *Kow ^ 




HORTICULTURAL SHOW 

The Ihirticultural Show .-oniniittu 
wishes to take this o})p.)rtunity to thank 
every one who helped to make the 
Horticultural Show a success. It was 
only through the co-operation of the 
students that the show was made po>si. 
ble. Also, the committee is very grat. ful 
to the Physical E.lu.ation department for 
the use of the Cage, which is an i.kul 
place for such an exhibition. 

We have, however, one criticism to 
make of the stu.lent bo.ly. We refei to 
the taking of flowers, apples, and signs. 
If any one wanted flowers or apples, the 
place to have obtained them was in the 
balcony, and not from the exhibits. Ihe 
taking of such things not only disfigures 
the exhibits, but it annoys the peojiie 
who are responsible for their replacement. 
No one means any harm in doing such a 
thing, but it is wholly thoughtless an.! 
selfish to make so much trouble for 
others. 

In the matter of signs we feel that the 
stu.lents show a .lisgraceful lack of self- 
control. A member of the committee 
place.! six posters in one place an.l tti.y 
were all torn down bef.)re the show even 
oi)ened. Signs directing visitors to the 
Cage were takei and had to be replaced. 
Leave the signs alone, chil.lren, an.l give 
some one else at least half a break, f If 
the juvenile students must have si^ns, 
let them wait until the occasion is 6ver, 
and no one will criticize them, but to 
make such replacements is an annoyame 
an.l an added expense to any committee, 
as well as a reflection upon the sell- 
control of those involved. 

Roland Cutler 'M 



What is the hea\T bur.len that Walt 
Maclinn is bearing on his shoulders? 

.Another dull, dead, drear, .lark dismal 
(loops- week-end with the population on 
the Row consisting only .)f th.)se receiv- 
ing the Dean's corresixm.lence. 



* 
* 



"ttoticcs 



^ 



Once more the co-eds can put on the 
war-paint. The following htnises have 
promised .lances before finals: Kappa 
Sigma, Kappa Epsil.in, Delta Phi Alpha, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, g.T.V. 



The stork got delayed and that new 
fraternitv will have to wait. 



.Alpha C.amma Rho is convinced that 
when w.)rse puns are made Boppo Br.)wn 
will make them. 



Kappa Ep, Phi Sig. Ka|)pa Sig, Sig 
Ep, .Alpha C.amma Rho, and Delta Phi 
acted as hosts to Rev. Clausen's assist- 
ants. The whole Row is just recovering 
from 2 a.m. bull fests over the past Con- 
ference. 

Now that the m.mkey suits arc packe.i 
away. Kappa Sigma can see what color 
Scott's shirt is. 



W.S.G.A. TEA DANCE 

On Siitur.lay, December .'i, the W.S.(.. 
.A. will give a Tea Dance. .All the wonun 
members of the faculty, the gra.luatc 
students, and undergraduate women of 
M.S.C. an.l S.S..A. are invited to atten.i. 
The Tea is to be hel.l in the .Memorial 
Building from 2 to 5.:«). There will be 
an entertainment, an.l music f.ir the 
dancing will be furnishe.l by an orchestra. 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

There will be a meeting of the Home 
Economics Club Thursday. December 1, 
at the Homestea.l at 7 p.m. Miss Haley 
will be the guest speaker. All the mem- 
bers are in\ ite.l t.) attend. 



Lamb.la Chi boasts of a one |)iece car 
since Russel's baruche decided to end it 
all and committed self-incendiarism, rath- 
er than en. lure being towed any longer. 



.Alpha C.amma Rho held a vie party 
November 22 with Professor and Mrs. 
Blun.lell and Professor and .Mrs. Ilni(l> 
worth as chaperones, the feature of thf 
evening being a turkey as yet without 
dressing. Yes, the .All-Fraternity co-ed 
was there. 



Sig Ep is planning a Sunday supi)er 
that sh.)ul.l be interesting. 

(Continued on Pafte 4, Column 3) 



POEM OF THE MONTH 

IN RETROSPECT 1918 

The iron .lice of destiny 

Their last grim game have won; 

.And blood-stained spoils of battle-play 

Are gathered, one by one. 

The crimson fields of unknelled dead 

War's brazen folly show. 

Valhalla claims all joyously: 

The conquered and the foe. 

L'envoi 

Like warriors of the dragon's teeth. 
The rusty helmets mark 
The anguished graves of men who lie 
'Neath crosses, pale and stark. 

Author: Mabelle L. .Anderson '33 
.fudge: Mr. Troy 

Manuscripts for the December competition must be left u-ilh 
.Mr. Rand by the \5th of the month. 



•«• 



SPORTS 



Booters Take Wesleyan 

Harriers Lose, 20-42 

CAIRO BEATS HUSKY \ MIDDLETOWNPLA YERS 



STAR IN CLOSE RACE 

Altiiough Dave Cair.l captured indi- 
v„hial honors, the .State varsity cr.)ss- 
((iiiiitry team was tlefeated by the 
S(,riheastern harriers, 20-42, on a sodden 
roiirse at Franklin I'ark, N.ivember U». 
W-lther Red Crawford nor Bob .Murray 
ftcn able to run the whole course; and 
H) there were five Huskies to cross the 
li,„. l>ehind the State captain before the 
next Maroon and White runner fmislie.i. 

Ked Crawford's ankle that he hurt in 
the New Englands again prevente.l him 
(rum finishing; for alth.jugh he started 
and took the lead at the first he was 
forn'il to .Irop out at the en.l .)f the first 
ni.le. Bob -Murray di.l lUJt even .Ion a 
track suit, for in the last practice the 
Tiiurs.lay aftern(x>n before the race h«' 
WIS ki.ked by a horse that was being 
rid.ien by a co-etl over the cross ountry 
i,iiir>e in one of the co-e<l riding classes. 
With his two running mates out .>f the 
r.u.', Dave Cair.l was force.l t.j take the 
lead for State. The little State runner 
WIS f<.rce.l all .)f the way by C.eorge Lamb, 
l|ii>ky <icv, whom Dave shut out by 
aliDUt a stride at the finish. The next 
Stale men to finish were Dave Cr.)sby 
nrid Little who crosse.l the line t.)gether. 
Keil ami .Allen complete.l the count of 
the first five men to finish for the Maro<jn 
an.l White. 

The summary: 

l.<t. Ciiird of State; "Jnd, Lamb of N.l'.; 3rd, 
\lnr.mi! of Nl'.; 4th, Slimpson of N.U.; .5th, 
KiHlluim <«f N.U.; 6lh, C attley of NU.; 7th. tie 
Ut»''<n .rosby and Littlf of State; <.Hh. Sudrabin 
oiN.U.; llhh, Weaver of N.IJ.; 11th, Robalc of 
M'.; r.'ih. Keil of State; 13th. Ranu-y of .N.l'.; 
i4ih AU.ii of State. 



State Freshmen Win in 
Squad Race at Amherst 

.\<i\ ember 17th the State College 
freshmen won the five-cornered squa.l 
rae over the Amherst freshman course. 
Stukhridge School's team was sec.m.l; 
the .\inherst jayvees third; the .Amherst 
irishman team, fourth; while the last 
!)la( e went to the State junior varsity. 

Sttxkliri.lge capture.1 the first two 
places on the placings of Pen.Iergast and 
1'iers.m. Then came three State fresh- 
men Dunker, Bishop, and Pr.x-tor. 
Craft of the State freshmen in seventh 
place was the other State man to finish 
within the first ten.. More than fifty 



TURNED BACK, UO 

In the final game of the season for the 
State luKJters, the heret.)f.)re un«lefe;ited 
s.Kcer team fr.)m Wesleyan was turne.l 
back, 1-0, <m the .Alumni Fiel.l-pitch 
No\ember 17. The M.iroon an.l White 
booters finished their VJ'.i'J career by out- 
playing the supp.jse.lly stronger team 
fr.nn Mi.l.lletown. 

F.)r the first three peri.wls, the State 
.lub easily han.lle.l t!ie Wesleyan b.)ys. 
In spite of the fact that during the first 
.piarter, the h.ime soccerites ha.i three 
shots at the g.Kil to one for the visitors, 
the State team faile.l to tally. The over- 
.■.mfident W'esleyan c.imbine |)lay«*.l very 
|K).)rly at the start, but .luring the se.'oiid 
peri.xl the visitors' teamw.)rk improvcHl. 
The M.ir.Mni booters still h.i.l the edgi- 
though .111.1 ha.l at least two shots at 
the net when they might ha\e easily 
s.-ore.l. The l.)ne State tally came in the 
third quarter, Jackson scoring .luring a 
melee in front .if the Wesleyan go.il. 
During the last ja-riod, the visiting team 
began to click, but neither si.le could 
gain the advantage. 

Starring for State were Cowing, Cap- 
t.iin B.)b T.ift. Riiss Tift. Pruyne, an.l 
(Continued on Paftc 4, Column 4) 



runners totik i)art in this race which 
ended the season for the State freshmen 
an.l sec.m.ls. 

The scores of the teams were: .State 
Freshmen 30, St(xkbridge 75, .Amherst 
Jayvees Ki, Amherst Freshmen S4, .in. I 
State Junior N'arsity 131. 



Freshmen Tie Sophomores 
in Their Annual Game 



In a very close contest «m Drill Fiel.l, 
November ICi, the M.issachu setts .State 
sophomores and freshmen battle.1 to a 
scoreless tie in their annual numeral 
game. 

The Frosh displayed a {»owerful oflfen- 
sive att.ick in their .Irive for the g.Kil line, 
but could n.rt .level.)p enough scoring 
punch to pierce the strong sophomore 
defense for a touch. l.)wn. Cummings, 
Moran, and C.riffin playe.l stellar foot- 
ball for the Sophs while Bob and Dick 
Peckham, .Sturtevant, and Conn.)lh fea- 
tured f.jr the Fr.)sh. The line-uji: 



STAMPED STATIONERY 
with Name and .Address -Makes a good Christmas Present 



A. J. Hastings 



NEWSDKALER and 
STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



GIFT 
STATIONERY 

Alluring and Inexpensive 

Should bring a prompt 
acknowledgement 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' I'rescriptions Killed. Broken lenses 

accurat' ly replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

» PLEA.SANT STREET, .up one««aht) 



IDA M. BRIDGEM.\N 

Graduate of New Ilngland Conserva(or>' 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst, .Mass. 



THE POETRY CURE 
A i)!x;ket medicine che.st of ver.-e 

by Schauffler 
' '• t'l ^-J. .")()— green leather S-'i.Of) 

-\ MANTHOLOt.V 
IV-ms for Men by Schauffler .«2.')0 

POEMS 

:• Rand, Morton and Frost 
-Autographed 



Sl.(K) BOOKS 

Standard Books of Briti>h and 

American Verse 

GREAT SHORT STORIES OF 
THE WORLD 

WORLD'S BEST POEMS 

WORLD'S BEST F:SSAYS 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



'^'^^^'^^^'^'^'^'^'^'^ 



^ 
^ 



(Ihru the Iknot 1holc 



^ 
^ 



llie e.lilor of this coluinn r...i\e.l I lie 
following letter in response to hisdeiiian.l 
for a nickname f»»r Massiichu setts State's 
varsity teams: 
Dear Sir: 

In the issue of the Coltenian of the l.Uli 
of the m.Hith is pla.e.l an a|)peal f.)r 
some n.inie for .>ur f(M>tb.ill a^greg.ition. 
The names of "Wil.lcats," "The Mar.KMi 
Wave," "B.iystaters," an.l the "Pilgrims" 
were suggeste.l. ll.iwever, I think t li.ii 
I have a name much more a.le.|uate than 
any .)f the ab.>ve-iiieiition.'.l: the "M.issa- 
soitirs" or the "Massasoits." 

Since ours is a state college, whose 
state was name.l after an Indian chi.f, 
it woul.l be quite proiH>r th;it we shoul.l 
make referen.e to that stalwart In.lian, 
Chief Mass.isoit. 

Massas.)it is a name whi.h siigg.sts 
w.irriors, b.ittle, an.l a true ..illege spirit. 
The Bay St.ite "Mass;isoits" woul.l rank 
as a ni"-kname e.pial to any .>f the lea. ling 
.•olleges. 

Therefore, I suggest as a name in 
k.'.-ping with the .lignity and prestige of 
Mass;icliiisetts St.ite, .me of the f.)l lowing: 

• I'll.' M.iy State Mass;isoits, Fhe 

Massasoits," .>r "The Mass^isoiters." 
\'.)iirs iriih , 

Philip 1). .\mlers<in 



H.>w .iboiit it? 



Lou Bush, Massiichusetts State half- 
b.ack, is the undisputed king of the 
N.ition's football s.urers. 

The litlh- New Englaml.r WDun.l up 
his seas.)!! ;i week ago with III i>.>ints, 
far bey.Hiil the runner-up, U.iliili (.raliain 
of Kansjis State, who fiiiislie.1 with H't. 
Third i)lai (• w.iit to Carroll Br.Hlerick of 
WesUrn Kentucky Tea.hers. with S-J. 

The lea.ler ia each of the Nation's ten 
major groups or .-onhTein^i-s follows: 

Sfiliiin J'l,i\rr (iiiil Coilfge lit. I'lil. l-l 



Kast, Hush. .Mass. Slate 1« »' U 

HJK Six. (irahaiii. Kan. State I'l 7 O 

S l.A A., hr.M|.ri.k. W. Ky. H <> « 

Southwest, llilltar.l, Ti-xa» 12 it <> 

Smth. Zinimcriiiaii. Tulaiic 11 -I U 

Mi.lw.st. .Monrall. Mich. S 21 O 

KiMkv Mt. ( hristcnwn. I'. «> 1*1 1 

.M.I. Val. .;.)r<l<.n, < rei(!htim <t n !t 

I'a. ilii. Smith, Idaho '» '» <' 

Bin Tt-n, Manders, Minnesota 6 7 



ri. 

114 

M 

70 

'u 
■A 
-t\ 
•ill 



Sophomore* Fre»hm*n 

Wihry, (Davis. Thay.r). I.- 

XV. Ml Sally iRosc, Martin, Koonns) 
("umminK (Hall). It .... 

rl. Bixby (Ballon. Dana.zko. .Ml«-n) 
Moran (lallie). 1k rK. IJarr.ms (Bahlwin) 

Chary (riimminK). c c. ( onntiUy (Stiirnvanl) 
CilUtti' (Kiiins.1.11). tv. Ik. MonriH' iHai/inani 

Uimarzio (Hall), rt It, Boylen (Shulkin, l-or.l) 

(iriffin (BonroKni). re le. < "'htis 

WiMxl. <il> 'jh. Stewart fOi.k Perkhain) 

Ml Killinott (BdnzoKni, OBri.-n). Ihh 

rhh, \alhntini' (Boh l'f< khaiii. Sli..nKo<xl) 
Consolflatti (Siira, Savatial. rhl> 

Ihli. Prystas (.Mancldla. Bal< aiioff) 
l.an<lis (Bail.y). Il> fh. •.riswoM (Murphy) 



>i9 



AM HERS 



Thursday. Dec. 1 

Ch.irlie Riiggl.s— Mary Holand 
Herbert .Marshall— Sara .Maritza — in 

''RVENlNCiS FOR SALK" 



Friday, Dec. 2 



WARNIIR l{AX'H-:R"in 
'SIX IIOI RS TO LIVE" 



Saturday, Dec. i 



RICHARD DIN — in 

"HELLS IIIC;iIWAY" 



Monday. Dec. 5 

C LAKA BOW 

in 

CALL ME S.WAGE" 



T u esd ay , Dec. 6 



Herbert .Marshall— Kay Fran, is 
.Miriam Hopkins -Charlie Ruggles-in 

"TROUBLE in PARADISE" 



Wednesday, Dec. 7 



Warren William^.— Bette Davis 

in - "3 ON A MATCH" 



Tufts Noses Out State 

Leary Picks Rival Stars 



V/OODV/ORTH OF TUFTS 
OUTSTANDING PLAYER 

ll,i\ing conii)li't<'il .i successful se.ison, 
his te.iiii winning sev.-u games .in.l losing 
tw.), I). ill l.e.irv, liM.l.r of the M.iio.di 
.111.1 White gri.liron ftirces, has given his 
sele.tions f.ir the .>utstaii.liiig iil.iyers 
wli.) pla>e.l ag.iinst M.is>.ii liusetts Si. tie 
this year. 

W.Mnlwortli, liifts left t.ukh', is chos. n 
b\ the St.ite .inter as "the most out 
stan.ling a.ul best all-arounti player." In 
C.iptain I.eary's opinion, the Tufts g.iiiu' 
w.is tlu- liar. lest .'.mtest in which Mass.i 
.hiisetts State played .luring the season. 
Th.' Mar.M>n and White lea.ler compli 
iiieiits the Kenssel.ier eleven .is "the nio.st 
sporlsmaiilike s.iu.i.l of .itiiletes w.' 
pl.i\ed." 

C.ipt.iin Lear\'s silections .is tlu' tnit- 
stan.ling players: 

En.ls Meyer, Rensselaer; Malloy, 
Wor.ester Tech; E.ldy, Conn. < ti.iit. 

r.i. kles W.MMlw.irth, Tufts; Ricio, 
Mi.l.llebury; Pier. e, Connecticut. 

("■liar. Is C.ilunibus, Coast Guar.l; 
Torrey, B.>w.loiii; C.).hraiie, Tufts. 

Center Millikan, B.)w.l.)in; English, 
.Xnih.-rst ; Maggi.w.nii.i. W Or.ester 'T.-ch. 

(Jiiarterbacks W.irner, .Amh.r.st; Root, 
R.nssel.ier. 

Halfbacks dayman. Tufts; K. 

Dowiies, Rensselaer; Ri. har.lson, B.)w 
.loin. 

Eiillbacks Hubbard, Bow.loin; David, 
(".).ist Guard; Kehoe, .Amherst. 

Ellert Meets Hoopsters 

for Opening Practise 

Coiich Kre.My Ell.rt hi-ld the first 
practi.e of the .anili.lales for |M)sitions 
.III the Massiichusetts State varsity 
basketball team in the coll.ge gymnasitim 
.111 November 2S, with over .'.."i pros|H'. tiv.- 
h.Mtpsters rep.)rting. 

Captain ( ior.lon "Doggie" Hoiiran .li.l 
not attend the first pracli.e of the .MariMiii 
an.l White basket.-ers be.ause he is 
attending a convention in Detroit .luring 
this week. H.iuran, h.iwever. will join 
the s«iua<l when he arrives in AmherM, 
I'ri.lay. J<X' Shert, likely guar.l candidate, 
,ilso was not in att.iidan.-e, but he will 
rei>ort to Coai li Ellert as soon as In- has 
fully rerovere<l fn>ni a f«.«itball injury. 

Coach Ellert h.is a nil lens .)f si.x l.tt.r 
men arouii.l whi.h to buil'l a winning 
.-.mibine, llou.an, Alilstrom, Fawcett, 
Hanson, Bush, and Lojko having won the 
.<)vete.l ".M" lasit s<'as<jn. Ellert 's . hit f 
jiroblems are t.i develoji a center to fill 



JUMBOS TURN BACK 
MASS. STATE THREAT 

.\it hough C.t.1. Ii Mel 'TaulM''s Massa- 
. hiisetts St.ite College footb.ill team pre- 
sent. '.I .1 str.mg .illi'iisivf atta.k which 
..irrie.l the b.ill n-peatetlly .l.)wii near 
the liiinbo go.il line, the M.iroon and 
White eli-\fii could ii.it .s<'ore a touch- 
. low 11 an.l suc.umbed before a strong 
Tufts i.imbine, ti "J, in a close g.iiiie at 
Tufts 0\,il, .Me.lford on November lU. 
Louis Bush, State's stc'llar lialfba. k and 
the nation's le.i.ling scorer, was held 
s.-.>reless for the first time this season by 
a b.iiid of hard-fighting, sliibborn Jumbo 
athl.'tes in the IHst meeting between the 
two rivals in a st-ries which b.'giii\ in ISHC). 
The St.ite ba.'ks gaiiie.l more >'ar.la){.' and 
. halked up more tirst downs than di.l the 
M.'.lforil eleven, but o\-eranxiousness on 
tlu- i>art of the 'Taiibeiiien when they 
were in scoring distaiUT of the 'Tufts go:il 
line led to the Mar.Kiii iiii.l Whit.- d.twn- 
fall. 

Coach 'Taiibe's men ina.le their first 
real attempt to score late in the first 
IH-riod, when Frigard heaved a long pasa 
from the Jumbo's 4 1 -yard line, which 
Louis Bush successfully ..'iiiglit on 'Tiifis 
1 1-yard line but the .State star was 
ta. kle.l iiiiinedi.it<-ly by Claymaii, the 
Jumbo .|iiarlerb.ick. F'rigard aiul liuidi 
then bii. ke.l the Tufts' forwar.l wall for 
f.nir plays only to gain fiv.' >arils. 'The 
Jumbo goal line stand, featured by the 
\'i< ions t.ickling of Vagjian, M.'tionagle 
.111.1 Linli.-rg, was an exaiiiph- of the 
strong brand of .lefensive f.Mitball which 
(Continued on i'ufte 4, Coluinn 2) 

the va.ancy of TIetch.-r, ami to iliscov.T 
.1 pl.iyer that cm take over the left 
guar.l positi.m, last year held by Captain 
Fol.y. 

State lias th. h.inlesi basketball .sched- 
ule in the lollege history, in. hiding an 
iipening game with N'.ile at Ni'W Haven 
on J.inii.iry II, .in. I a mid season contest 
with Harvard in .Amherst. Co.uli Flllert, 
when iipproa.'he.l abc>ut the b.isketball 
pr.ispe.ts, was noii'.'omniit.il, but .Mana- 
ger Parker Sissoii of Lynn iiia.le the 
following statement. "State has very 
promising materi.il an.l .is ev.-ryone is 
showing a fin.- spirit of co (i|M-ration with 
Coa.li Ellert, I pre.li. t a brilliant season. " 

'The following are consi.leri-d first or 
set .ind sipiad material: Hoiiraii, Bush, 
Alilstrom, Lojko, Fawcett, H:iiisoii, ShefT, 
Kinsbiiry, N.issif. I.ibbey, Miilhr, Bowhr, 
J.iMjrski, O'Briin, Harris, I hayer. Davis, 
Pease, Landis, an.l Mineritk. 



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F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



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known for their lastinj^ style, natural fit, and »leferniine<l wear 

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Because we want vour permanent patronage, we recommend these 
truly fine oxfords with built-in quality. It pays to buy ROod shoes. 



E. M. SWITZER JR., Inc. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1. 1932 



NETTLETON SHOES 

They Pass the Pencil Test of Fine Shoemaking 

Do you know the conif<jrt and economy of shoes with Flat Bottoms? All Xettleton wearers do. This 

characteristic of fine shoemakinj^ is exclusive to our Xettleton Shoes. — Try The Pencil Test 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



(Contlnuad from Pag* 3) 

belly,' and who are completi-iy lost without their riches. Many a capitalist is so 
constituted that if he receives a blow in the stomach, he has heart failure. . ." 

— The World Tomorrow 

EDITORIAL MISCELLANEA 

Our sincere sympathy is extended to the family and friends of the late Isadore 
Rahinowitz '.«), who died recently of blotxl poisoning. 

Philomathia deserves congratulations for the success of its undertaking. 

Many a man who starts out to lie a martyr ends up by being a foot. 

Margaret .Sanger, famed authority on birth control, will adtlress the parley on 
"Marriage" to be held by students at VVesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., 
on December H and •>. Other speakers will be IVofessor Krdnian Harris of Union 
Theological Siminary. New York; Gladys H. Groves, co-author of Sex in Marriage; 
and Father John M. Cooper of Catholic University. How times do change! 



I 

■ 



CENTENNIAL MEETING 

HELD AT NEW YORK U 
(Cuniinu«d from Page 1) 
protluct of the war, the treaty of Ver- 
sailles, the period of great inflation 
following the war, and then the depres- 
sion. Sir Arthur Salter, former direitor 
of the economics and finance section of 
the League of Nations, also addressed 
the group. 

"The University and Governmental 
Changes" was the title of the third 
section. The fourth, "The University 
and Spiritual Values," aroused the great- 
est interest. Alfred Noyes, the English 
poet, read several of his poems in his 
address on this subject. 

The concluding addresses were given 
at a dinner the last night of the conference 
in the Grand Hall R(M)m. The topic was 
"The University and the Changing 
World." Walter Lippma.i, commentator 
of worhl affairs, and Nicholas Murray 
Hutler, President of Columbia University 
delivered addresses on this topic. 



hive other speakers assisted in this 
conference which was conducted by the 
Y.W.C.A. and the Christian Association. 



RECORD ATIENDANCE AT 

CLAUSEN CONFERENCE 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

seclusion of college life" to take an active 
part in the worltl. They, re the Corjiora- 
tion, the Machine, and War. These foes 
cannot he beaten by man alone, but only 
with the aid of the divine power that 
comes through pra>er. 

Rev. Clausen concluded his series of 
addresses with one entitled "How to Get 
What You Want," which, he said, was 
the (juestion nuxlern young people wante<l 
most to have answered. He said, "Know 
what you really want; get what you want 
by working, praying, s;icriticing for it; 
and most important of all, want what you 
get when you get it." 



90 SIUDENTS TO TAKE 

PART IN BAY STATE REVUE 
(Continuwl from Page 1) 

Much interest has been evinced in the 
first public performance of the men's 
glee club, which was formed this fall under 
the managership of David CosgrifT '34, 
who has presented the following tentative 
program for the Revue: 
College Song -"Dear Old Massachusetts" 
Novelty- "The Man Who Said 'Well' " 
Shadow March— Robert Louis Stevenson 
Winter Song 

The College Band, under the direction 
of W. Grant Dunham '.M, will close the 
Bay State Revue with the following 
numbers: 
March -"On the Mall" E. F. Goldman 

(Audience whistling and singing chorus) 
Overture in Miniature — 

"Glorious America" Karl L. King 

Concert Arrangement— 

"Stars and Stripes Forever" 

John Philip Sousa 
Exit March — 

"Gardes Du Corps" R. B. Hall 



JUMBOS TURN BACK 

MASSACHUSETTS THREAT 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

Tufts has displayed in Medford in past 
ye.'rs, the Jumbo eleven having not lost 
a game on its home gridiron since 192»'>. 
The remainder of the first period was a 
punting duel with Higelow of State 
having a good edge over Clark of Tufts 
in this department. 

In the second perioti after an exchange 
of kicks had placed the ball in midfield 
in State's possession, ShefT cut through 
tackle and raced fifty yards through the 



Tufts team to the Jumbo 1-yard line, 
Wo(xiward, giant Tufts' lineman, finally 
tackling the State halfback, .\gain the 
jumbo defense tightened and the Maroon 
and White eleven couUl not hammer 
tiirough the Tufts forward wall for a 
touciidown. Near the middle of the 
second period Tufts received the ball on 
its 24-yard line and began a steady, 
powerful 7f)-yard drive down the field, 
which resulted in a Jumbo touchdown, 
Clayman plunging through tackle from 
the State 1-yard line on fourth down for 
the score, dayman's attempted place- 
kick was unsuccessful. The half ended, 
Tufts 6, State 0. 

In the third i)erio<l, State played 
determined football and drove the Jumbo 
combine back to its goal line. Grinnell, 
Tufts' star punter, was sent in to kick 
his team out of danger but Smith, de- 
pendable State right end, broke through 
the Tufts line and blocked the kick, 
Grinnell recovering the ball for Tufts on 
a safety, thus awarding two points to 
Massachusetts State. Tufts then suc- 
cessfully punted to midfield and the 
Taubemen began another drive towards 
the Tufts' goal with Bush and Sheff 
bearing the brunt of the plunging attack. 
Frigard uncorked a beautiful 24-yard run 
which carried the ball to the Jumbo 
8-yard line but State's offence could not 
click for a touchdown and Tufts was 
awarded the ball on downs. 

Tufts, opened the fourth quarter with 
a strong attack which placed the ball on 
the State 25-yard line. The Maroon and 
White line held, however, and Tufts was 
forced to kick. With only a few moments 
left to play. Bush hurled a long forward 
pass but it was intercepted by Clayman, 
who ran to the State 40-yard line just 
before the game ended. 

Captain Dan Leary, playing his last 
game was the mainstay of the State for- 
ward wall, ably supjwrteii by Binka 
Smith at right end. Bush tlid some 
creditable ball carrying on the few 
occasions he carried the ball, but Sheff, 
State left halfback, was the most con- 
sistant ground gainer in the Maroon and 
White backfield. The line-uj): 

Tufts 



MIDDLETOWN PLAYERS 

TURNED BACK, 1-0 

(Continued from Page .t) 

Houran. Several of the men on the squad 
played their last game. Those who 
finished their career on the pitch are 
Captain Taft, Pruyne, Hodsdon, Houran, 
Shuman, Stephan, and Beeler. Captain 
Ahrens, Brooks, and Galloway played 
well for Wesleyan. The summary: 

MasB. State We«leyan 

Houran, K 
Ilodsdon, rb 
Cowing, lb 
Blackburn, rhb 
I'ruyne, chb 
Talbot, Shuin.in, Landsman, Ihb 



K, Allen 

rb, Blake.slee 

lb, Balloway 

rhb. Canhatn 

chb, Ahrens 

Ihb, Hayn 

iiratKimmic. Stephan. rof rof. White. Hutchinson 
Bob Tatt, I'ease, rif rif, R. Talbot, Bean, Brown 
Jackson, cf , ,.cf. Brooks 

Russ Taft, Beeler, Hunter. Entwhistle, lif 

lif, Pitou 
Kozlowski, lof lof, J.Talbot 

Score, Mass. State 1, Wesleyan 0. Goal. Jack- 
son. Referee, Day. Time, two 20 and two 18 
minute periods. 



Jaworski has had to trade his smoking 
kit to Consolatti, his K.E. roommate. 



Alpha Sig has compiled a list of articles 
the intelligent sleeper takes to the ram 
pasture. It is: 5 heavy blankets, 2 top- 
coats, 2 copies New York Sunday Times 
(used under mattress), 1 woolen nightcap, 
I pair fur-lined mittens, 1 pair overshoes. 
Any foot-warmers? 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Myron G. Murray '22 and A. D. Barnes 
'24 (}j are authors of a very attrutivt 
bulletin on "Street and Highway I'lani- 
ing" published by the Gardeners' and 
Florists' Association of Dade Cuutity, 
F'lorida. - — ^ — — — 

The Amherst Record reports that at a 
dinner meeting at the Hotel Bancroft, 
Worcester recently where gathercij the 
state agencies of the Connecticut (.tntrui 
Life Insurance Company, Ralpli \\ 
Redman of Amherst, and Roy I). Harris 
now of Greenfield, received respwiiM-ly 
first and second prizes for service and 
sales during the October contest of the 
Insurance Company. Both these men 
were formerly of the State College faculty. 



Delta Phi boys are stepping out. Not 
content with attending a Phi Epsilon Pi 
dance after the Tufts game, some went 
to Providence to an A.E.P. dance last 
week. 



Joe Cleary has captured the Q.T.V. 
frappe eating contest. 



Mass. State 

Smith, re 

CumminKs, Mulhall, rt 

Sibson, Nietupski, rg 

(■ai)t. Leary. c 

Leavitt, Burke, Ik 

Sievers, (iuzowskt. It 

Ryan, le 

Kiitelow. I>ojko, Qb 

Bush, rhb 

Shetf. White. Ihb 

Frigard. C"oburn, fb 



le. Oliver, Tyrani-e 

It, Batchelder, Linl>erK 

Ig, Mctionagle, Spalding 

c, Carlyn. Parkhurst 

rg, Capt. Cochrane 

rt, VVooilworth, Fox 

re. Yagjian, Grinnell, Mann 

<lb. Clayman 

Ihb. McMahon 

rhb, Staffon. Monler 

fb. Clark, Froehlich 



Apologies to Lambda Chi. It 
have been two other houses we 
thinking about. 



must 
were 



C. R. Vinten *22 supervises southern 
business for A. D. Taylor 'O.'j, laii(ls<a|)e 
architect. Ray has his headquarters in 
Orlando, Florida but operates all through 
the Gulf States as far west as Texas. At 
present he is handling important jobs 
in New Orleans and Cialveston and inci- 
dentally compiling extensive lists of plant 
materials for those sections. 

John E. White '27 is resident landscape 
architect on a large real estate develop- 
ment at (ireat Neck, L. I., N. Y. John 
re|)orts that he was married in 11)29 and 
now has a daughter a year old. 



Don G. Nowers '2.'} is still keeping up 
the fight as a landscape architect with a 
new address at 2212 Liberty Street, 
Allentown, Pennsylvania. 



Watch this space. A new interfra- 
ternity contest is being prepared that 
will take your mind off the finals and put 
it in its pro|K'r environment. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 

Massiichusetts State College was the 
first college in the country to offer a 
course of study in forestry. This was 
started in 1S87. 



Earle S. Draper '15 makes the front 
page of Landscape Architecture in Octolier 
with an extended, interesting illustrated 
article on 'Southern Plantations." This 
is the first installment of what is to lie a 
real book on this very interesting topic. 



The competition for the Charles Eliot 
traveling fellowship in landscaiK.' archi- 
tecture at Harvard University was held 
.August lt> to .September 2. Of the four 
men who entered the comi>etititm two 
were former students at M.S.C., viz. 
Frederick .\. Baker '2t) and .Arthur C. 
Sylvester, F\G. Sylvester won the prize, 
which finances a year's trip for landscajK 
study in Europe. 



M.S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

"Let Dave do it'' 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 
Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



was 



ON AND OFF THE ROW 

(Ck>ntlnued from Pafte 2) 

M Alpha Sig, Don Wallace 
awakened. "What's the matter Howie?" 

Hinckley: "There's a mouse in the 
wastebasket. " 

Don: "Aw. close your mouth and it 
won't bother you." 



Typing 
First Cla.«s Work 



Low Rates 



MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494- M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



Now that basketball has started Ernie 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

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GOTHAMETTES 

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Ow Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaramleed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



College Drug Store 

\V. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



FISHER'S 

PAJAMAS 

Velveteen 
Corduroy 
Terrycloth 
Rayon 
Crepe 

Broadcloth 

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THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

14 MAIN STREET 
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.30 
.25 



MEN'S WHOLE SOLES and 

RUhBER HEELS 
MEN'S HALF SOLES and 

RLBBER HEELS 



LADIES' HALF SOLES and 

RllBbER HEELS 

LADIES' RUBBER HEELS 
LADIES' LEATHER HEELS 

All Work Guaranteed 



THE CANDY KITCHEN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 

SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 

INCORPORATED 



^•$-4*4-**4-'*-4-4-* 



4- 

I A CURRENT EVENT IN A. 

*V THE COLLEGIAN J 

4- — 

jgt. Df, JoMph B. LIndiiey retire* 

A. afier forty yearn of t>ervtce 



/Ibaesacbus 




A. C. Library. 



•fr 






(LoUcQian 



OtTSTANIMNG EVENT 

OF THE WEEK J^ 

Luuiit Huah lia* hven elected *V* 

tapialn of thefouihull team' Hgh 



.{^.{^.{^.{^.{g}.<{^^H^«^4**<i>* 



Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1932 



Number 10 



Bay State Review Held 

Last Friday Evening 



Omt Ninety Students Participate in 
Roister Doister Presentation 

()\,r ninety students participated in 
the Roister Doisters' presentation of the 
19'.V2 liay State Review which was held 
in Huwker Auditorium last Friday e\e- 
ninu ''t seven o'clock. 

Inilt-r the direction of Edgar Sorton. 
the College Orchestra opened the Revue 
with two selections. Up the Street, a march 
|,v Morse, and Selections from Victor 
llerhert. "Back Stage" given at the 
Dad's Day entertainment hy the I'hi 
Zeta sorority was the second act pre- 
sented. "Back Stage" was written and 
acted by Bernice Dolan of the class of 
'<»;{;{. Two musical condiinations of a 
xylophone and organ and a piano and 
violin were given by (ieorge Hartwell 
ttith Roger Bates at the organ and 
Howard Parker with Robert Noble at 

the |)iano. 

(ConHnued on Pafte 4, Column 1) 



MR. BARNARD TO OPEN 
SERIES OF LECTURES 

l.anftua&e and Literature Depart- 
ment to Present Talks 



Announcement is made that the series 
of lectures given each year by members 
of the Language and Literature depart- 
ment will begin next term on Tues<lay, 
January 10, 19:W, with a lecture by Mr. 
Klisworth Barnard. Mr. Barnard has 
(-b<i«*n w hi<» subje«-t "Criticism in 
Literature and Life." 

S\eral others of this department have 
also announced their subjects. Among 
them are the following: "Byron," with 
pictures, by Professor Charles H. Patter- 
son; "A Week-end in the Middle Tem- 
ple," hy Professor Frank Prentice Rand; 
and a combined lecture on Parsifal by 
I'rofessors Arthur N. Julian and Stowell 
('. (.(xling who will deal res|x;ctively with 
tho literary and musical aspects of the 
ojxTa. 

l'r(.fessor Walter E. Prince will give a 
reading lei:ture on Krapp's modern 
version of Chaucer's narrative poem, 
' Troilus and Cressida." Mr. Frederick 
S. Troy plans to deal with the general 
subject of Christian Platonism with 
specific reference to Spenser's "Faerie 
Queene." Professor Charles F. F'raker 
and Mr. Fred C. Ellert are as yet un- 
decided as to their subjects. 



Bishop McConnell Talks 
Before Sunday Assembly 

'The Christian approaches God along 
the line of activity. He that does the 
will of GcmI to his fellowmen understands 
'■fHl.' declared Rt. Rev. Dr. Francis 
John McConnell, bishop of the Methwlist 
Kpisopal Church in an address at Sun- 
day morning chapel, Deceml)er 4. He 
''•fik ;is his subject, "How Jesus Put To- 
i?<-thtr and Held Together the Two Ideas 
of R'.'iijjion." 

Hishop McConnell said that Christ 
spoki two commandments together, 
"'•'»">• the Lord thy Ciod with all thy 
^if^trt nd all thy stre.igth and love thy 
^^V- ■ as thyself." He said that 
^hn,i mity must always combine these 
'*f> nd hold them together. "Christi- 
'^"'ty rinsists in taking things which are 
alreaU well known and putting them into 
new n l.itionships. There is not much 
f'xji!. 1 Christianity for mysticism and 
"Jntcr, ;,iation apart from the world. 
•^eilbtr can service to mankind alone be 
practi.«»tl as an end in itself. If such a 
Pracii f is held as its own end, ideals are 
^xjn i'lrgotten and service descends into 
"later ;!mni jjpj humdrum existence." 



c: 



two commandments are not 



S'^p.iru;; they are one. If they are 
*parar,,j they become harmful, not to 
^^e iiKiividual, but to society as a whole 
^•iroiiKh the loss of the most devout 
P'nts and the loss of mass ideals. 



"PEG 0' MY HEART" 

TO BE WINTER PLAY 

Roister Doisters to Revive Favorite 
of Fifteen Years .Ngo 

Laurette Taylor's great role of fifteen 
years ago, "Peg (Y My Heart," written 
by J. Hartley Manners, will be presented 
on March ID, W.Vl, for the Winter Play. 
The story is one of an Irish girl who 
comes into a class-bound F-nglish family 
of distant rehuion. (iradually she wins 
them all o\-er through her own person- 
ality. It is primarily a one-part play 
Peg's play. In brief, it is comedy with 
gotxl characterization. 

Shirley McCarthy ';}4 has the lead, the 
part of Peg, and is i)eculiarly adapted to 
the part. The rest of the characters are 
straight English parts. Some of the older 
members of the s<xiety ha\e had some 
training along these lines. 

"Peg ()' My Heart" has not lieen j)er- 
formed in anything like the Laurette 
Taylor style for some time, and it is 
expected that Miss McCarthy will do 
that very thing. The play has been used 
by amateurs a great deal lately. F'or 
younger |)eople, the charm of the original 
production is wholly unknown; for ohler 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Judging Team Returns 
from Chicago Exposition 

Livestock and Meat Judged at In- 
ternational Show 



.Attending the International Livestix-k 
Flxposition, six stu«lent URMubers of the 
meat and livestmk judging teams of the 
college returned to .\mherst last Friday 
after a week in Chicago. 

Inder the student management of 
Ralph Bickford and accompanie<l by 
Richard Foley, coach of the meat judging 
team, and Professor (datfelter, coach of 
the Livestock judging team, the group 
left .•\mherst for Chicago, Wednewlay 
afternoon, November 2.L Traveling by 
bus they reached Toledo, Ohio. Thanks- 
giving night and remained there until 
Friday morning. They arrivetl in Chicago 
Friday night. Saturday, the livestock 
judging team participated in the inter- 
collegiate contest held at the arena of the 
International Livestock Exposition. Prac- 
tically all of the agricultural colleges in 
the country participated in this annual 
(Continued on Pate 3, Column 4) 



DEAN BROWN OF YALE 
ADDRESSES ASSEMBLY 

Taking as his topic, "The difference 
between having something and being 
something," Dean Charles Brown, form- 
erly of the Yale Divinity School, ad- 
dressed the student Ixvly yesterday after- 
n<x)n in Bowker Auditorium. 

"Life is made up "f qualities, not 
things." Dean Brown said. "That was 
the substance of the Master's teachings. 
In the sermon on the mount, the Master 
speaking among simple [xjople in the 
country said that the poor in spirit shall 
l)e happy, that the gentle shall inherit the 
earth. The idea of having things is 
ruinous. One may have everything but 
there shall be leaness in the soul. Com- 
pare the Ruth of the Book of Ruth with 
Ruth Hanna .McCorrnick; one had but a 
sickle and the other great wealth. Yet 
after three thousand years the words of 
Ruth are stiil remembered while Mrs. 
McCorrnick has already been forgotten 
by the masses." 

Dean Brown a-k.-d the question m 
conclusion: "What ..n we meant to be? 
What are we here for? We are meant to 
be members of an enlightened smial order 
where everv man shall practice the teach- 
ings of the Master. We are meant to be 
regardless of creed, the sons and daughters 
of the most high." 



POSTER EXHIBITION 

IN "M" BUILDING 

Posters typical of F-uropcan ad\ ertising. 
widely (lirterent from the .Xiiicri* aii poster, 
are on exhibition in the Memorial Build 
ing. The greater part of these ix)sters 
•iihertise railroads, air ami steamship 
lines of mcKlern Europe. They are 
imtdein in design ,^nd piitorial represin- 
t.uioii and attract attention in a manner 
totally different from advertising in this 
country. 

In Flurope, where posting is sharpK 
restricted and the f-izv of the billboards 
strictly limited, mlich gre.tter effort has 
been made t<J increase tin* appeal of the 
small posters by improving their artistic 
qualities. The art of creating {josters has 
come to be rectignized as a S|)ecial field of 
considerable interest. France and tier- 
many have led in the prcxluction of 
posters in the fiehl of design, whereas 
England has given most attention to 
pictorial appeal. Excellent examples of 
the posters of these nations will be found 
ill the exhibition. 

In F^ngland many prominent painters 
have been employe<l to prepare first class 
pictures for this use. The reasons which 
have jinxluced distinct ty|K"s of a«lvertis- 
ing in Europe and America will be seen 
in the exhibition. 



Last Informal of Term 

to be Held This Friday 

Tickets to Be Sold Under New 
System 



F'riday e\ening, December '.», from 7..{() 
to II p.m.. the last informal of the term 
will be held in the Memorial Building. 
Mr Walter MmUpii. chairman of the 
Informal Committee, re|)orts that this 
will be a regular dance with chajn'rones 
and an ore hestra. It is ••x[K'< ted that Red 
Emery will be playing cards in the 
chajR'rones' corner and Maclinn hcjpes it 
will ncjt be solitaire. In fact that burden 
whicdi he is bearing on his shoulders 
consists cif offers tcj chajH-rone the dance. 
Although he has spent several c-venings 
(Continued on Pag* 4, Column 4) 

RESULTS OF ANNUAL 
STUDENT CHEST DRIVE 

Nine Campus Organizations Rate 
One Hundred Percent 

According to an announcement made 
by .Malcolm J. Fcjwler, chairman of the 
Red Crcjss Student Chest Drive, the 
total amount received was Sl.'VK. 17. Al- 
though this did not ajiproach last year's 
total it shows that a gfKid representation 
of the college contributed. The results 
according to fraternities, sororities, men, 
women, and two year students arc as 
fcjilows: 



['hi Sigma Kapi>a 

Q.T.V. 

r>«!lta I'hi Alpha 

SiKtna I'hi FZpsilon 

Ali)ha Siuma I'hi 

KaptKi Ki^ilon 

I^mliHa (hi Ali>ha 

Kapiia SiKma 

Ali>ha <#amnia Kli'> 

Thota (hi 

SJKma Beta (hi 

I'hi Zeta 

Alpha Ivamb'la Mil 

lambda IJtIU Mu 

K.K. . 

A.T.d. 

Men 

Women 



\m Percent 
100 
100 
100 
H."j 

x; 

70 

70 

70 

70 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

70 

70 

HH 



The committee wishes to extenci its 
appreciation to all who helped to make 
the cirive a success. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Rrproadiful \[>ee(h from either side 
1 ke want of argument iupplitd; 
They rati, revtled: as often end% 
The contests of disputing friends. 

— day hahle-., Kaxens. 
.Sextons and l:iirth Worm. 



I Friday, December 9 

8.(KJ p.m. informal Memorial Hall 
8.1. "> p.m. (ilee Club Cont-ert, Hartford 

Saturday, December 10 

H.CXJp.m. (rilliert (,;ibric1. Dramatic critic, 
.Memorial Hall 

"\'ic" parties 
.Sunday, December II 

S).(KJ a.m. Sunrlay ( hapcl 

2.4.'>p.m. Helen K'ller. IJowlcer Auditorium 

.'J.OO p.m. Radio (oniert. Memorial Hall 
Monday-.Saturday, December 12-17 

Kxaminationi 
Tuesday, January .». IM3 

8.30 a.m. Second Term Commence?* 



Dr. Lindsey to Retire 

From College Position 



GILBERT GABRIEL TO 
LECTURE SATURDAY 

Roister Doisters Bring Well Known 
Critic and .\ulhor let Campus 

(iilbert (iabriel. iine of the outsi.inding 
critics of modern drama, will lecture cm 
"The Critic and His Work," Saturday 
evening at H p ni. in the Memorial Build- 
ing. Mr. (iabriel will speak under the 
auspices of the Roister Doisters before a 
meeting which will be open to the public 
as well as mend>ers. 

Mr. Oabriel has had much experience 
and has already gained recognition in his 
field, lie has been an author, literary 
editor, music critic, and lecturer as well 
as a critic of drama. He has been at- 
tached to the literary departments of 
several leailing New \'ork newspapers, 
beginning his career with the New N'ork 
Sun in 1 •.♦!'). In I'.UT he became music 
critic and in 1H24 transferred as dramatic 
critic to the .New York I elcgramMail. 
\\. present he is a lecturer on drama and 
criticism at New N'ork I'niversity as well 
as dramatic critic of the New ^'ork 
.American. Several of his novels have 
been published. "Brciwnstone FVcmt," a 
story cjf New N'ork has established his 
right to recognition. 



Nationally known .\ftricullural 

<:iu'mist Has ileen Connected with 

tlie Colleite for Forty Years 

.Nationally known as an agricultural 

I chemist. Dr. Jo.seph Bridge l.indsi-y will 

retire from active work on December 2d 

I after forty \e.irs in the .service of the 

j college as researth profesHor, academic 

I professor, .iiid Ic-acher. At a faculty 

I jKirty last .Siiturdav night, he was feted 

by his colleagues, friends, and cla.ssmates. 

Dr. I.iiulsev w:is lioni in .Marblehead 

on l)ecend>er J(i, 1,S(12, the son of Joseph 

and Flmily Lindsey. He graduated from 

this college with the class of 1KX2 having 

completed the regul.ir fcnir year course 

in three years. Tnder Dr. (IcK-ssmann, he 

served two years as assistant in the ex- 

IH'riment station. F"or five years he was 

employed as chemist and sidesman by the 

I.. B. Darling Fertilizer Company of 

I'awtuiket, Rhode Island. 

(Continued on Pafte 3, Column 5) 

HELEN KELLER TO BE 
ON CAMPUS, SUNDAY 

Famous Author Will Appear in 
llowker Auditorium ut 2Ah 



Rev. W. R. Bowie to 

Address Sunday Chapel 

East Chapel of Term Will Hear Well 
known .Speaker 



Next .Sund.iy, December 11, will bring 
Rev. W. Russell Bowie of (irace Church, 
New York, to campus as the cha|Md 
sfH-aker. 

.•Xfter being graduated frrmi Harvard 
College in l!M)4, a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa society, Rev. Bowie did graduate 
work, receiving his M.A. degree in I'.M).'). 
From liKir) to l'.»2.'i he attended Theo- 
logical -Seminary in Virginia where he 
received his B.D. degree ;uicl Richmond 
College where he received his D.D. At 
present he is rector at Grace Church 
where he has been since 192<'3. 

His other duties inc-lude lecturing at 
llnicin Thec>logic,il Seminary, (leneral 
Theological Seminary, and Theol<»gical 
Seminary in X'irginia. Anictng the c-oni- 
mittees he has servwl c»n are the World 
Omference on F'aith and Order and the 
Social Service Committee. He is an 
active member of the bc^ircl of clirectors 
of Vassar College. During the World 
War he was chaplain at base hospital 4.'). 

Besides being a former eclitc)r cjf the 
Southern Churchman he is the authctr of 
numerous bcjcjks. .Among his most recent 
works are "The Inescapable Christ," 
"The .Master Life of Jesus Christ," and 
"On Being Alive." 



GLEE CLUB TO GIVE 
CONCERT IN HARTFORD 



On Friday c\c-ning, December '.», the 
.Massachusetts St.'ite College tilee Club 
will gi\'e a concert in Hartforcl. ( oni. at 
H.\r> for the benefit of the Hartford Psy- 
chiatric llos[)ital. The conc;ert will be 
given at the Psychiatric Hospital. 

Jcisejih Cleary of the c lass of '.'M will 
acc-ompany the dub as tenor scdoist and 1 
Kdgar Scjrtcni '.Hi will give a violin solo. 
The c lub uf.der the management of David 
Cosgrifl and the direction of W. firant 
Dunham will inc lude in their jirogram 
many semi-classical anci spiritual somjs. 

The cjfficials of the hospital have ex- 
tencled this invitaticjn to the Cdee Club 
and will |>rovide the transfXirtation to 
Hartford. 



To hel|) others wh(» are hanclic ap|>ed 
with blindness in their search for happi- 
ness and light is the pur|>ose of Helen 
Keller who will speak in Bowker Audi- 
torium on .Sunday afternoon, Dec c'ml>er 
11, at 2.45 o'clock. This ap|M-aranc e of 
Miss Keller is >|Kmsored by the Andx-rst 
Womui's Club and the American Foun- 
dation for the Blind, Inc. 

Called by many "The (ireatest A|N>stlc 
of .Achievement," Helen Keller will de- 
scribe her years of struggle in order lo 
obtain light, anil tell her auelience some- 
thing of the- wcirk of the Found.it icm 
among the blind people- of this country. 

The Foundation, a national organiza- 
tion, is altempling to give the blind as 
great an op|)ort unity for happiness as 
the ordinary child receives. Its work in- 
1 hides the supervision and correlation of 
the various blind institutions of the 
natiem and the propagation of knowledge 
about America's blind. On its board of 
directors are found famous blind men and 
women as well as other naticmally known 
humanitarians. 

•Sunday's program will inc hide an organ 
recital by .Miss Mildred Pierpont and 
several songs by All)ertine Dean, a blind 
coloratura, accompanied by Mrs. Hemier 
Newell. .Mr. .Stanley King, Presicletit of 
Amherst College, will preside. 

.Admission is by card which may lie 
cjbtained through any IimjiI organization 
without c ost , 

Various Sports Announce 
Varsity Letter Awards 

The annual bancjuet of the Ma.ssachu- 
setts St.ite Collc-ge- football team was held 
at the Lord Jeffrey Hotel in Amherst last 
night with over one hundred guests 
prcsc-Mt, inc hiding players, cojuhes, faculty 
and .iliimni. Louis J Bush of Turners 
Falls, the nation's leading scorer, was 
• Ic-cted to the captaincy of the Marrx/n 
and White grid forces for the next year, 
succeeding Daniel J. I.eary, also of 
Turners Falls. Curry Hicks, head of the 
physic al echicalion clepart mcnt. announced 
that twent>-c)ne mc-ii h.id won t he co\-et<'d 
"M" sweater in ffKitball for this year. 
Jinim\ Keegan of Pittsfidd, noted eastern 
fcK)tball cjfficial, was the main s|M'aker of 
the evening and gave a talk ctn the value 
of f(Kjtl>.ill. Other sjM-akers were Head 
Coach Melvin Taube. Captain Daniel J. 
Leary, Captain -eh-rt Bush, Bill Doran '17 
alumni sc-cretary, ancI Kiirle Chevalier of 
the Sf»ringfield Hepnhlican. The follow- 
ing plavers wc re- awarded letters: 

Captain Leary, Captain-elwt Bush, 
Smith. R\an, B. Cummings, (iii/owski, 
Mulhall. Sievers, Nietu(»ski, Burke, Bic k- 
(Contlnucd on Pafte 2, Column 5) 



#' 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGL\N, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8. I9.« 




/BbaesacbuseliF CoUcQian 



Official newsijaper of the Massachusitts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



BOARD OF I:DIT0RS 
W. Raymond VVakd "S.i 
l.dUur-in-Ckief 



EUGBNB GURALNICK '33 
Manatint lidilur 



Alfrbda L. Ordway "33 
Associot* Editor 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 

Editorial 

\V. Raymond Ward '33 

Campua Atbletlca 

Raymond Royal '34. Idilur Theodoke M. Lbajy "35 

Alfkbua L. Oruway '33 Silas Little. Jr. 3S 

Ruth D. Campbkll '34 
Harriette M. Jackson '34 

Mary L. Allen '36 „ . ^ 

David L. Arbnberg '35 E»chanjies 

Elizahkth K. Hakrini.ton '35 Alfrbda L. Ordwav 33, Edttof 

Peatur* 
Stanly F. Sepbrski '34 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
AdMTtisint Manager 

Frank Batstonb '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. Gurnby '33 

Buiintss Manager 



Business Asslatanti 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Managtr 

W. Lawrence Scbenck '34 



Subscriptions 12.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts ColleRian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
o( postage provided for In Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authoriied August 20, 1918. 



EDITORIALS -J^** * *** 



SfA TE 

smvc 



Then there was the freshman co-ed 
who looked all over the Chemistry lab to 
find a meiii.u IIS. 

ss — 

A local boy makes ^ood in f'.reenfield. 
A State man breaks into the society pagL- 
of the C.reenfield llish Si-hiMVs Exf>oucnt, 
"Miss ~ 's blind date from M.S.C. 
turned out to be culv." 

ss- 



Stoc[^bri^ac 



^ 
^ 



THE COLLEGE STUDENT AND THE MASS MIND 

Not the workers, not a class, but a type of individual which is present in all classes 
and which is at present a dominating force,— it is he. and he alone, who composes the 
mass. As to what extent the average college student is of the mass, it is for him to 

judge. 

Like a si>oile<l child is the mass man. He believes in the unrestricted use of his 
full desires and jK-rsonality, and shows little if any gratitude to those beings or forces 
which have made possible his comfortable jmsition in life. He believes that he has 
no obligati<ms to s<xiety and (I<h>s not inteiul or place himself in a ix>sition to fulfill 
any. He looks on life as a barbarian warrior would look oi a rich village; it is a 
thing to pillage and |>lunder for his own profit, lie is out to get what he wants, 
honestly, if {wssible, but to get it anyway. 

With the six)iled child character the mass man combines a spirit of self-satisfattion. 
His present nio<le of living is a jolly existence, and he doesn't care to waste a thought 
concer ling others whose existence may not he so ideal, or to worry about the future. 
He does what he jolly well likes and lets the devil take the hind most. 

In his mind the unfortunate are themselves entirely to blame for their circum- 
stances. He takes all kindnesses for what profit he can, but his own heart knows 
neither kindness nor charity. With a full stomach and a smiling face he passes lines 
of shivering men waiting for bread in the tlirty streets of hopeless cities; he d(H's not 
see the jxile white faces t»f the starving children of the poor; he never realizes that the 
sleeping forms huddled on the cold ground each night in the city parks are men, 
creatures like hims.lf. With smug complacency he thinks. "How much lu-tter am 1 
than they!" and passes on. 

He is an inert mass of \ rotoplism. Inertia controls his mind. When considering 
a problem he is satisfietl with the first answer which comes to his kind. He has no 
time for reasoning but learns <mly through life. His motto is: "Don't think; just 
keep going." Old ide.is are g(H)<l because they are i)ld. and new ideas bad because 
they are new. Tradition and prejudice he makes his guides through life; so<ial 
approval he makes his law of life. For the trials and i)rol)lems of others he has no 
sympathy; for their i<le. s. no undc rstanding. Ik- holds in contempt all ideas dilTer- 
ent than his own; lie sees as fools all those who dis.»gree with him. 

The mass mind grants no higher authority, no other stanilard, than that of bis 
own. He ctmsiders excellent every thought or characteristic which he finds within 
himsjlf. His taste, his i<Las, his standards are the truly great. If his friend is a lover 
of classical music, he scoffs and laughs at such foolishness. That any one should 
prefer a dilTerent type of music tha.i the current jazz is beyond the comprehensio.i of 
the mass inilividual. In th - higlicr re.dms of thought he is not content to grant unto 
Caesar the things th. t are Caesar's, hut makes Caesar Cotl. Christianity,- -in the 
re .1 essence, he knows no such. For hims If. it is sufficient that he pat himself on ti.e 
back and call hinis If a real .American. 

The mass man is not noble, f )r aa essential characteristic of nobleness is in mak- 
ing demand u|X).i ones If. He is not mass becaus." he is the multitude, but bcraus. 
he is 'omplacentK in rt. He is content to Hoat on the waves, without im|M)sing on 
himsvlf an> demand, duties, or difticulties. He is content to be every moment a cork 

float up on the sea. 

He has a driving dedre to m;ike out of games, si)orts, and anuisements the centril 
occupatio.i of his cl.is;. In his games and sports, as in life itsvlf, his only pleasure is 
in winning; he takes no r.l.-asure in the game itself. He is amused by any trash that 
glitters, and to be anuise<l is (me of his greatest aims ir life. 

He is not lib-ral, liberalism meaning "that princ iple by which (he majority at- 
tempts, even at its own expense, to U'ave room for those who neither feel or thinks 
as it does." The mass dovs not wish to share life with those who are not of it. It has 
a de.idly hatred of all that is not of itsvlf. It squelchts free speech and imprisons 
others for sentiments othir than its own. The very nature of its members prohibits 
them from even concei\ ing of one's wisliing to do otherwise than that which every- 
one else does. 

.-\noth(r char.u*. eristic of tiie mass man is his attitude toward the government. 
He takes for gr,mte<l the more or less snuxrth running of the extremely complex 
governmental michine. It aiivtl ing g<K-s wrong, or he feels a era. ing to extend a 
power, he assumes that ail tlie elTort necessary is to lean back in his cushioned office 
chair, push a button, gel in touch with Washington and say. "L'Etat. c'est moi." 
He takes it for granted that tlie government will rush the marines and the navy to 
Nicaragua, if its the banana business which is in trouble, or to any other place where 
the safety of his dollars may be threatened. W'hy should be puzzle out the causes of 
the trouble and make an attempt to rectify them? He little ccmsi<krs the fact that 
a ccmple of hundred marines and natives may meet death; the important fact is 
the continuance of the high profits which exploitation brings. If any creative min- 
ority disturbs the old order of things, whether it be in smial custom, politics, or 
industry, the government must crush it. Here wc meet with mass "liberality" again. 
Is the average student a mass man? We do not know . But are you? 



Both blue and red crayon pencils seem 
to be ecpially po|)ular among our pro- 
fessors but neither a red nor a blue 4 or ') 
preceeding a O on an exam paiK-r looks 
very artistic to the owner of that paper. 
■ — ss- - 

A sun- sign of winter. Storm windows 
are being put in that convenient waiting 
room which is located opposite Wilder 
Hall. A storm may rage and howl out- 
si<le but all will be peaceful and serene 
inside. 

— — ss 

Sweel Sue made a valiant come-back 
last Friday night but she hit the dust in 
the end. . . One of the movements the 
Kho Damniits should advocate is bigger 
and better mugs. . . Too many of the 
members of the audience could not re- 
strain their .■\mlierst Theatre noises. . . 
Last month at the Social Union it was 
Haida! . . . but this month it was diddly, 
diddly. diddly do. 



Herbert F. Stone, S'li'A, of Hopkinton 
has won the ap|M)intment as editor-in- 
chief of the Stockbridge School ^'e;lrbook 
lilt' Shorthorn, as a result of the re<ent 
essay com|)etition. Charles R. Bonne- 
mort, S'3;{, of Dedhani has been chosen 
as business manager of the book. Pro- 
fessor Rcjllin 11. Barrett of Farm Man- 
agement will continue as faculty adviser 
to the editorial board, a position he has 
filled most acceptably the past several 
years. 



88^ 

And still they come. A freshman tore 
into his fraternity house and asked his 
brothers whether or not it was true that 
Professor Moore asks the freshmen to 
write "Merry Christmas" as one of the 
questions on the math final. 
ss 

Remember the Honor System during 
final week, for although anyone can make 
laws where will the jxilicemen come from? 

— ss- 

Enjoy the house dances before the 

finals for they may be your final ones 
here. - ss - 

How many noon hour classes are you 
scheduled for next term? Next term many 
of you will have to eat your breakfast 
before you go to bed. eat your dinner 
when you wake up. eat supper anywhere 
between ».:«» a.m. and 2.:i(» p ni.. and 
eat a light lunch at the end of the final 
class at 5 p.m. What we need is Eddie 
Cantor to solve the problem. 
ss- - 

More than thirty-five basketball can- 
didates mean more than thirty-five 
basketball uniforms. Many of the can- 
didates are fitted cmt not only to re- 
semble Zebras but also to resemble the 
first cousins of Zebras. 

- - ss- 

First chemist: "Say. what is Lini- 

berger cheese composed of?" 

Inorganic ditto: "It ain't composed, 
it's decomposed." 

ss — ■ — 

The Candv Kitchen sells approximately 
eight jiackages of Camels to every six of 
Chesterfields, to two decks of Nature in 
the Raw to one of t)ld (".olds. Lot of 
walking in tho.se Canals. 

ss 

The youngest group of cnillege students 
in the Inited States is loc.ited im the 
campus of Purdue University. Sixteen 
small children from two to four years 
comprise the nurser> sch(X)l maintained 
by the schcMil of home economics for the 
purpose of training co-eds for nur.sery 
work. The tuition is only a ilollar and a 
hall. The scIkm)] has become so popular 
that there were thirty-five applicants to 
fill three vacancies. 

ss — - — 

Extract from M.S.C. News Service: 
"As (ierman as the Rhine itself, but 
international in its popularity and health- 
ful (pialities that's sauerkraut. During 
and after the World War. the consump- 
tion of sauerkraut in the United States 
slumped, because many people were 
prejudiced against anything that bore a 
C.ermnn name. But in more recent years, 
both home prcKluced and factory canned 
sauerkraut have regained their popularity; 
and a rel.ited focnl prtxluct, sauerkraut 
juice, has climbed to the scxial register 
among drinks." 



Mr. Fdward Morgan of Springfield 
will take the place of Mr. Ralph Oatley 
as ccwch of student mass-singing. Mr. 
Oatley was forced to withdraw because 
of his heavy schedule before the holidays 
w ith his other musical clubs. 

Stanley D. Pearson. S'32. of Briarcliff 
Manor, N. \'., won \ry ribbons and a 
silver medal of merit as a result of his 
dahlia exhibits this fall, .\niong these 
was one blue and two red rilibons, first 
and second prizes respecti^ely. in the 
New \ork Show of the American Dahlia 
Society at the Hotel Pennsylvania. He 
has just been awarded a Student .\p- 
prenticeship at the New York Botanical 
(iardens for a two-year pericwl. after 
which hecxjiectstostudy at Kew Gardens, 
England, for a year or more. 

.•Mthough the senior class was out- 
numbered by the frosh. they won the 
annual cap rush on November 28 by the 
close score of .'iO-4S. It was a great 
battle, with Carl Frank starring for the 
seniors, getting a total of six caps. 



NOTICE 

.All students desiring to tukt ;. 
course in Scientific Cireek will pKas^ 
leave their names and schedule of frg^ 
hours at the Dean's t)trice sonutinn. 
liefore the end of this term. 

Bec.iuse of the fact that the stuii.nts 
who are now taking the course wi>li to 
ccmtinue it through the Winter tirm 
there will be only cme class hour a week 
for beginners and the work will ht i,,„. 
tinued through the -Spring term. 

.No previous knowledge of (in,;. 
recjuired. 

The class hour will be arranged for iht 
convenience of those whose schedules 
are received. 



At a meeting of the Stockbridge 
Athletic Board the following men were 
awarded letters: 

FOOTBALL 
Anthony Castro, Stanley Doskotz. Charles K. 
Foulsham. John V. GallaRhor, Frank J. Hahn. 
Chilton M. Hastings, MRr.. Alfred B. Jaeger. 
I^'land B. Lvermore, John R. Martin. Captain, 
George T. Mueller, Heihert E. Riley, Raymond 
A. Shulander, Jo^n M. Turner, .\iistin S. Childs. 
Charles R. Dondcrs. Stephen A. Kldred. Edward 
C. Erlandson. Jr., Roger L. Hershey, Thomas J. 
O'Connor. Franklin W. Prest-ott. Jr., rdwin M. 
Ryder, Fram is R. Sievers. J. Luis Zuretti, Edward 
L. UUman. Russell J. Wood. 

CROSS-COITNTRY 
Paul O. Koistinen. Harold J. Pearson. Milton R. 
Swanson. Mgr., Lawrence H. BLickmer. William 
L. Pendergast. 

Tlie following cross-country men rei-eived 
numerals: I.<>land S. Towne, Beni.iniin Baren- 
haum. Prcscott W. Chase, Marsliall J. Rice. 



'^ ®n an^ Off the "Row 






Final standings in Interfraternity sports 
for the Fall term: 

g.T.V 211 

Kappa Sigma l''l 

Sigma I'hi Epsilon .... 1~~ 

Theta Chi I'i2 

Phi .Sigma Kappa .... l-''^' 
Lambda Chi Alpha .... 140 

Kappa Fpsilon l-H 

Alpha Sigma Phi .... 124 
Delia I'hi -Alpha . lIC 

.Alpha C.amma Rho . lU} 

Sigma Phi Epsilon won the football 
championship. (J.T.\ . won soccer, while 
Theta Chi and Kappa Sigma tied for 
swimming. 



This ad has been placed in all the 

Inasmuch as it is sometimes diffiLult to <lislingiiish between letters which are, ' . ', . " ' 

intended as personal mess;iges to the editor and those which are intended as contri- j DANCINt. I.LSSONS. $1 AN HR. 
butions for publication, wc ask that contributions for publication be plainly deiig- 1 Drag a co-ed to a vie party and have 
nated as such. We a|K)logize for any misunderstanding which ma\ have resulted three or four hours of dancing lessons 
from this confusion. free of charge. 



JUDGING TEAM RETURNS 

FROM C;HICAC;0 EXPOSITION 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

contest. The college team tied with the 
University of \ irginia and jilaced eight- 
eenth, defeated the Connecticut State 
College, the only other New England 
team entered. Ohio State University won 
the contest and brought the title east of 
the Mi-ssisiippi for the second time since 
1920. 

On Sunday, the team attended the 
banquet held for the college judging teams 
entered in the contest. On Monday, the 
teams visited the field museum, plana- 
tarium, the accpiarium, and the buildings 
erected for the World's Fair next year. 

In the contest for the meat judging 
teams, held on Tuesday, the college 
placed eighth, defeating Pennsylvania 
State College, the only other team from 
the east. Wednesday the team departed 
from Chicago, and arrived in .Amherst 
early Friday morning, December 2. 

The members of the livestock judging 
team were: Charles Entwistle, Cordon 
Houran, William Smith, Edwin Thomp- 
son, and Richard Whitcomb. The meat 
judging team comprised Thompson, Smith 
and Entwistle. Ralph Bickford was the 
student manager of the teams. 



DR. LINDSEY TO RETIRE 

FRO-M COLLEGE POSIlJON 
(Continued from Page 1) 

In IKKS, he married Miss H. Fr.mcis 
Dickinson, a daughter oi Captain Dick- 
inson of North .Amherst. .After leavini; 
the employ of the Darling Company, he 
sailed for (iermany in 1880 wher, he 
studied at the I'niversity of (iottinnen. 
He received his degree of Dcnrtor of 
Philosojihy there and studied later at 
the Polytechnic Institute in Zurich, 
Switzerland. Returning to America in 
18U2, he came to this college and hct.inK' 
research professor in animal nutrition. In 
IHtt.") Dr. Lindsey became head of the 
newly formed division of the chemistry 
department of feeds and feeding. .After 
Dr. (ioessmann's death in 1007. he became 
head of the Chemistry department which 
had been reorganized. He was given the 
title of (joessmann Professor of Cheinistrv 
in UU 1 and was elected to be head of the 
academic department of chemistry. He 
served in this capacity until 192S when 
he resigned to continue his studies in the 
experiment station. It was under his 
leadership of the department that the 
(joessmann Laboratory was construi ttil. 

Dr. Lindsey has written over one 
hundred and fifty pamphlets, bulletins, 
and papers on animal nutrition ami 
agricultural chemistry. Original creative 
work of much value to all agricultnralisi- 
has been fostered and accomplished hy 
this man. As a student in Euroiie, m 
(iermany and in Switzerland. Dr. Lindsey 
acted as correspondent for the college 
pajwr of that time, The College Signal, 
and then Aggie Life. During his many 
years as a teacher and worker on the 
campus he never failed to take an inter- 
est in student life, and he wrote many 
communicaticms to the Collegian which 
revealed him to be not only a chemist 
but also a philosopher and humanitarian, 

Through his efforts, several laws now 
recognized to be of inestimable value in 
the protection of agricultural interests 
were initiated and passed in the st.iie 
legislature. He was a member ol the 
.Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity when it wa^ 
known as the Shakespearean Cluh. In 
the official publication of that fraurnit\ 
a few years ago (l(»2;{i he was ii.il'i t 
noteworthy tribute. 

.At the faculty reception last Saturday, 
Dr. Lindsey was gi\en a tribute worthy 
of a man who has spent his life in serNint 
this college. Dr. Homer Wheeler ol 
Montclair, N. J., a classmate "f I'r 
Lindsey and representative of the .ilumni 
s|>oke in praise of the teacher. He saifi 
in part: 

'Upon retirement from a^ti^e duty. 
he has left an impress upon his students 
and colleagues that will never be forgotten. 
We who know him intimately in tollegc 
considered him our uncut diamond. .^ 
more kindly heart never beat, though 
parth' obscured by a seemingly sonic 
what rough exterior, and no student en 
the campus exerted a n ore restraining 
insj^i.ing. and continuous influence for all 
that was best in college life." 



VARIOUS SPORTS .ANNOUNCK 

VARSITY LETTER AU ARPS 
(Continued from Pafte I) 

ford. Sibson. Leavitt. Lojko, H:^clo» 
Sheff, White, Frigard. Coburn. M< uiitain. 
and Managtr Minerick. 

Roy Cowing is captain of next year? 
scKTer team, succeeding Robert la' 
The following were awarded letters i" 
soccer: 

Captain Taft, Captain-elect ' "«'"^ 
Mackimmic, Kozlowski, Jacksim H<""i' 
stein, Blackburn, Pruyne. 111'.;^!"" 
Houran, Dcjbbie, Landsman, 
Russell Taft, Talbcjt. Beeler, 
(iuralnick. 

Dave Caird will again lead tl > ^r^'*'" 
country team. The following i' " """^ 
awarded letters: 

Captain Caird. Crawford. M"'^'*-' 
Crosby, Little, and Manager Newtofl- 



unian. 
Mi:r 



•*• 



•*• 



SPORTS 



•*• 



Soccer and Cross-Country 
All-Opponent Teams 



THREE AMHERST MEN 
AMOSG MVAL BOOTERS 

\ itierst leads in having the most men 
III! I lie all-opponent soccer team chosen 
bv the State varsity btx)ters. This team 

;n.ide up of the outstanding players 
ironi the college teams that State met 
(luring the last season. (Ireenough of the 
Loril Jeffs was probably the best man to 
play against the Marcxin and White 
team; and as captain of the Siibriiias, he 
was cme of the causes for State's only 
ihtf.il of the season. 

Three members from the Fitchburg 
club that tied State- are on the all- 
oppcment team; one of them, Ponte, tied 
with an .Amherst man for a position, 
(lark has two players, and Worcester 
Tech and Wesle\an, one each. Connecti- 
lUt Aggie is not represented at all. 

The line-up of the selected team wcjuld 
be as follows: g. Forest of Clark; rib, 
(Ireenough of .Amherst; Ifb, Hebel of 
W IM : rhb. Pease of Fitchburg; chb, 
1' 11 Ward of Amherst; Ihb, Higgins of 
Aiiiiierst; ol, Southworth of Fitchburg; 
il. Brooks of Wesleyan; c, Davidscm of 
Amherst; ir, Brierly of Clark; or, tie 
hetween .Allis of .Amherst and Ponte of 
Fitchburg. 

Honorable mention went to: g, Allen 
of Wesleyan; fb, (iailoway of Wesle>aii; 
rhh, Hayn of Wesleyan, Knox of .Amherst, 
l.ehtinen of Clark, Whittum of W.P.L; 
Ihb. Hannum of Wesleyan, Riley of 
Fitchburg; ol, Talliot of Wesleyan; il, 
tlilton of .Amherst; ir. White of Wes- 
leyan, Klaer of Amherst; or, R. Talbot 
of Wesleyan. 



Interclass Athletic Board 

Announces Awards 



The Interclass Athletic Board held a 
meeting in the Physical Educ:ation build- 
ini; on December 2nd and voted the 
Miiner.d awards for all s[H)rts this term. 
The Interclass .Athletic Board consists of 
ei^ht members, two men representing 
c.uh class in the meetings. Larry M. 
liri^ns serves in the capacity of faculty 
.I'hisor for the board. In the meeting of 
1 •(•(■ember 2nd, Edward Fawcett was 
elected president of the board, and 
Theod(jre M. Leary was elected secretary- 
treasurer, both men to hold office for 
the yc.ir !<.t.{2-:i;5. The Intercla.ss .Ath- 
(Contlnued on Pafte 4, Column 5) 



HUSKIES HAVE THREE 
ON THE HARRIER TEAM 

On the ,ill-opiM)n,iil i ross-country te.im 
chosen by Captain Caird, Crawford and 
Murray- State's three leading runners 
during the past season, there are three 
Northeastern harriers, two frcjm .Amherst, 
and one each from Tufts and Worcester 
Tech. None of the men who compose 
this team of rival stars were able to place 
ahead of the three Maroon and While 
aces. 

Lamb was easily the choice for first 
m.m on the team, as he put up a great 
fight for first place against Dave Caird 
in the Northeastern-State r.ice. The other 
two Huskies are Captain Morang and 
Stimpson. The Lord J.'ffs on this team 
are Swc^tt and Hill, who fiiii>hed foinlli 
and sixth in the Stat.- race. Bow in from 
Tufts and Brewer of Worcester Tech are 
the other two components of the mythical 
( lub, both of these men finished fourth 
in their respecti\e meets with State. St. 
Stephens, the only other club that State 
met in a dual meet during the p.ist season, 
has no represent.it i\es on the team. 

TR.ACK PR.ACTICE STARTED 

FOR SIX MEET SCHEDULE 

Informal practice has already started 
for varsity and freshman winter track in 
the cage. Formal track practice will not 
start until after the Christmas recess. 

On the varsity schedule for meets this 
winter, there are three dual meets and 
three intercollegiate meets. In two of the 
latter, the Prout Memorial Cames and 
the B..A..A. meet. State has entered only 
a relay team; while the whole track 
team will compete in the University 
CTub meet. In these inti'rcollegiate meets, 
the Marcxm and W'hite trackmen will \ ie 
for honors in the class for small colleges. 

Freshman track candidates will have a 

chance to show their skill in a series of 

meets with the class teams from .Amherst 

College, some of these In-ing held in the 

State cage and others in the Lord Jefl 

gym. The l'.t2t» track team will also hold 

a meet with Stockbridge in the cage. 

The varsity track schedule: 
Jan. 2S Proiit Mcnmrial (iami-s In Boston Ciar- 

(len (relay team only) 
Feb. 4 Boston I 'nivtTsity in Boston 
Feb. 11 B.A..\. \UfX in Boston Arena (relay 

team only) 
Feb. 18 I'niversity flub Mc-«'t at Boston (ianlen 

(full team) 
Feb. 22 VVortester Tech at Masd. State 
Feb. 2.» Dual Meet i>en(line (probably to Ix- 

tilled by Trinity. Conn. AtJKie. or 

Rhode Island State) 



STAMPED STATI0M:KV 
with Name and Address — Makes a good Ciiristmas Present 



A. J. Hastings 



NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



LEATHER BAGS 

and 
ZIPPER PURSES 

in 
^»w and Fascinating Colors 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



S. S. HYDE 

(3ptician and Jeweler 

Oculists' I'rescriptions lilled. Broken lenses 

accurat' ly replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

J PLEASANT .STREET, 'up on* flldht) 

IDA M. BRIDGEMAN 

Graduate of New Fngland Conservatory 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst, Mass. 



THE POETRY CURE 

• \ !• H ket medicine chest of verse 
by Schauffler 
t:. S2..->(>— green leather J;L(X) 

A M ANTHOLOGY 

•V.c ins for Men by Scliauffier S2.oO 

POEMS 

by Rand, Morion and Frost 
Autographed 



«1.(K) HOOKS 

Standard Books of British and 

American \'erse 

(.KK.AT SHORT STORIES OF 
THE WORLD 

WORLirS BE.ST POEMS 

WORLDS BEST ESSAYS 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



|; ^bni the Iknot Ibolc ^ 

Now th.u til.- interlratvrniiN sjunis .iic 
over, this column jiublislies the n.imes of 
the outstanding players in each sport. 

The .All-Opponeiii l-"tH)ib.dl team as 
chosen by a group, consisting of the 
captain of fcM>tball at each fraternity, is 
asfcdiows: Cain, .A.C.R.; Bob I'ecklKim, 
S.P.E.; P. W.MxI. P.S.K ; T. I.e.iry. 
S.P.E.; Hammcmd. L.C.A.; Bailey, A. 
S.P.; Scoti, K.S.; Collins. (J.IW. 

riie .AIl-t)pponent Soccer team cdiosc-n 
by a group consisting of the captain of 
soccer at e.icli fraternity, is as follows: 
Pease, (J. r. v.; /icdinski, .A.S.P.; Steph.ui 
K.S.; Congdon, O.T.V.; Clarke. Q.T.X.; 
D.ividsoii. I.e.; Wheeler, T.(\ 

Joe Rogers, former Woici-ster Tech 
swimming coach and now coach at State, 
chose the outstanding natators of the 
season: 

l.")<)-y.ird medley relay: 1st te.tm 
back stroke. Batstone; breast stroke. 
Edney; crawl stroke. Hunter. Second 
team back stroke. Cone; bre.ist stroke, 
Hobart; crawl stroke, Eldridge. 

2()0-yard frc-style relay: 1st tram 
Hunter, Eldridge. C<me, Nisbet. 2nd 
team Merrill, (ilick, Lake, Tani. 



Louie Bush, stell.ir .State li.dfback, is 
coming in for his share of -All -.American 
honors. Bush, the nation's leader in the 
football scoring race, was gi\'en honorable 
mention cjii the Asscxiated Press .All-East 
team. Bush, also won further honors 
when he was given hcmorable mention 
on the Asscx:iated Press .AII-.Ainerican 
team. 



Bob Jackson and Jim Blackburn, mem- 
bers of Larry Brigu's stellar s<M-<er team, 
were selected cm the .All-Opp<ment team 
of Clark University. Jackwjn was chosen 
as cent.'r forward and Blackburn as 
right halfback. 



Every morning, the workers in the 
kitchen at the college cafeteria are set to 
work, in teams of three, scrubbing and 
polishing rusty trays. After a heated 
coin|H-tition, the combination of Bush, 
Maclinn and Beeler, have la-en ac 
claimed the undisputed winners. The 
champions have received an invitation 
from Citliforni.i to scrub out the Rose- 
Bowl after the Southern C.iliforiiia 
Pittsburg contest. 

Dan Leary. fiery leader oi the .Maroon 
and White football ele\en this fall, is a 
most vers;itile young man. Immedi.iteK 
after the footb.dl se.ison closed. Dan 
stepperl from the gridiron to the stage. 
He will sing in a selected men's glee club, 
composed of St.ite students, at Hartford 
tomorrow night in a concert for the 
benefit cjf a Hartford hospital. 

Speaking of versatility. Bill Frigard is 
not doing so badly. Bill played a st.dlar 
rcjle as fullback cm the football team this 
vcar. Now he is devoting his talents to 
jelly making in a < la.ss at the Mort. Man. 
building. Bill says that the reascm that 
his jellv is so good is that he aluaN's jiuts 
a little more ingre<lients into his jelly 
than is called for in the recipe. 

The Physical Education department 
has adopted a uniform sweater to be 
awarded for all si^rts. It is maroon- 
colored with a crew neck style. Letter 
wijiners in football, baseball, basketball, 
soccer, and hockey will receive the uni- 
form sweater, differing cmly in the form 
cjf the letter cjf the respective sjKjrt. 

Much favorable comment has been 
heard about the suggestion "Massassoits " 
as a name for the .Marcnm and White 
football eleven. .A new name has also 
been mentioned. "The Maroon Maraud- 
ers." How about it? 



Ellert Builds Hoop Team 
State to Play Yale First 



HARVARD BASKETEERS 
WILL PLAY M.S.C. HERE 

t)pening the hardest and most ambitious 
silu'dnle in the hisloi\ of M.issachiiselts 
Sl.ite b.isketb.ill, Coach I'lUrt will send 
his Maroon and White cpiintet against 
Sale at New ll.ivcn, Janu.ir\ 10. \'.ile 
had a most successful hcH>p season l.tst 
year and will present a powerful team 
this >cMr, .dtlioiigh the ser\ices of .Albie 
Booth will be missed in the forc-cciurt. 
Mass.u'luisetts State rcwiters will have 
their first chance to view the latest 
edition of Co.icli Ellert 's hoopsters when 
the Stale li\e meets Clark, in .Anilursl 
on Januar>' 1 1. To close a most strenuous 
opening wec-k, M.issachiiset Is will journey 
U|> to X'crmoiit (o pi. IN' .Middlebury on 
January 12. 

< bi J.inuar\' IS, the M.ir<M)n ;ind White 
b.isketeers .ig.iin play in .Amherst, with 
Williams, a team which defeated State 
last year, as the itppom-nt. Connecticut 
.Aggie will attempt to revenge the defeat 
.idmiiiistered to them by .State in football 
when it meets .State, in Amherst on 
January 21. .After a week's rest, Ellert 's 
band of athletes will again hit the north- 
ern trail, this time to engage New Hamp- 
shire at Durham on January 2S. On 
J.inuary '.il, Massach'usetts .State's cjuin 
tet will play Springfit-ld College at Spring 
field in what promises to be one of the 
most interesting contests of the year. 

The Maroon and White five cro8.ses 
over to .New X'ork to meet a strong 
Hamilton College team, in Clinton on 
February 4. On February S, State will 
attempt to atone for last year's defeal, 
when it plays in Amherst. Providence- 
College, the best basketball team that 
ap|>c-ared in .Amherst last winter. Coaih 
Ellert 's cpiintc-t will play X'ernnmt cm 
l"(-bruary 11. and Tufts on Fc-bruary l.'{. 
both of these games will be ctmtested in 
.Amherst. 

The .St.ite hoopsters will attempt to 
continue the work of the fcH>tball te.im 
■iKainst .Amiu-rst, when tlu-\' iiu-et the 
S,ilirina team .it .Amherst College- on 
I'ebruary 22. Then i-oiiie^ the- highlight 
of the Imm)P se-.ison, the- contest with 
H.ir\'ard College tc» be played in .Amherst 
on February 21. Massiichusetts State 
defeated H.ir\ard the- last time the- two 
institutions met in lt)2K and the .M.irooii 
anel White cpjintet was led to vie'tejry by 
Captain l-'rc-e|ely l-llle-rt, pr.'sent \ar»ity 
li;isketball eoaeh at Stale. The final game 
of the season is with We>rce-ste-r Ti'< li in 
-Amherst on l-'ebruary 2S. Tech was erne- 
of th.- few te-;ims th.it <lefi-.ited Massa- 
(Contlnued on Pufte 4, Column 4) 



HOURAN NEW LEADER 
of MAROON and WHITE 



Coach I'Veddy l-.llert, MasAachuselts 
St.ite b.isketball miiilor has been ilrilliiig 
(he M.iroon .iikI While hoop Mpi.iel lor 
the past week, stressing fiindamentals 
,111(1 ollense pl.iy. E\c-r\' pr.ictiet- has 
been used to expl.iin the- \.irious elemen- 
tary points of the st\le of basketball 
pl.iyed at M.iss;i( hiisell^ St.ite- to the 
niweemiers te> the team, .mil I'.llert is 
highly s;itistieil with the work of the 
soplomores, Nassif and Javorski, niem- 
liers of last year's stellar freshmen te-am. 
The sm.ill dynamic .St.ite- nii-ntoi has 
not be-eii drilling the players tiM> exten- 
si\e-l\- be-c.iiise- he wishe-s eve-r\' man to 
round out into sli.ipe slowly. However, 
.liter final examination week and tlie 
winter v.ic.ition h.i\e- passeil, |-~.llert will 
assemble the hoop si|uael in the st.ige .iiiel 
make strenuous efforts to develop a 
smiM>th, peiwc-rful conibin.ilion for the 
opening contest with Sale on J.inuary 10. 
The eeiiter problem h.is pro\ieieil no 
end e»f worry te> Coai h Ellerl anel he has 
spent .1 great amount of time anil work 
with the (.indielates who are seeking to 
fill Fletcher's place on the MareMin and 
White epiintet. Three men, all of them 
seniors, are making a determined bid for 
tilt- center position, Fawielt, Ahlstreini, 
anel Hager. i-'awe-i-tt anel .Ahlstrom won 
v.irsity letters last year in baBketball 
while Hager is out for u varsity txTth for 
the- first time. L.ist year's |K)we-rfiil for- 
waril pair. Bush anel Lojko, both juniors, 
appear to have their positions clinched 
anel will again le-.id the- Massaehiiselts 
State offensive. However, Bob Hanson, a 
senior anel a letterman, and i-^ddie Nassif, 
a sophomore, are waging a strong fight 
with Bush and Lojko for the- starting 
forece)iirt pe>-i ions and will see plc-nty of 
actiem on tie State epiintet this winter. 

Captain "Doggie" Houran, who filayed 
an exc llcnt defensive game last year, will 
be in en- guard |Kisitiem in the starling 
lineup. The- other b.iiki'oiirl position, 
left \acaiit by the graduation of Captain 
Foley, will be filleel by one of the following 
pl.i\c-rs, Javorski, I'Vi^ard, MeKelligol, 
O'Brien and Sheft. She-ff, .i member of 
the William and Mary hcH>p ejuintet two 
ye-ars ago, has not yet reiKirled for prae- 
tice beiaiis- he- is rieo\«ring from a foot- 
b.<.ll injury, but he is ex|M-e ted to make a 
strong bid for a giianl |M>silioii. 

The- folliiwiiiK nie-n (omprisc- the v.irsity 

sipi.iel under Coae h Lllirl, former Mas^a- 

ihusi-tts Slate hoop i-aptain: iioiiran. 

Hush, Lojko, Ibuisoii, Ahlstrom, lawee-ll, 

(Continued on PaHe 4, Ck>lumn 2) 



WARM (iLOVHS 
\V(X)L Sf)X 
HOKSKUFDi: (OATS 

wool polo ( o.ats 
zipim:k ski coats 
hkavyovi.kcoa'is 



$i.f)0 to $:iurt 

2."»c to .^1.0(1 

.S7..'.() t«) .SI l..")0 

$!t.00 

S4.4o 

$-2-2.:>ii to .si2.r.o 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



SKATE OUTFITS— FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

High grade skate outfits for men and women 
Exceptional Value at $.').0f) 

Hfxkey Sticks .j(K' ami $1 .00 I'lirks !Sc 

Woolen .Skatiii^i Soc k- .'{.'(e- t.'i ."((ic 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



XMAS PRESENTS 

Buy your Xmas Presents in a Man's Shop, for Brother and Dad. 
Neckwear, Hosiery and Jewelry priced reasonably. 



E. M. SWITZER JR., Inc. 



^IZ^ - 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. DECEMBER 8, 1932 



NETTLETON SHOES 

They Pass the Pencil Test of Fine Shoemaking 

Do you know the comfort and economy of shoes with Flat Bottoms? All Nettleton wearers do. This 

characteristic of fine shoeniakiiiK' is exclusive to our Nettleton Shoes. — Try The Pencil Test 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



BAY STATK REVIKW IIKIJ) 

I,AST FRIDAY KVENING 
(Contlnuad from Pag* I) 

Kntitlfd "Kho Uammit Klio Frater- 
nity" was a skit acted l)V Honjamin 
Isgur, Josi-pi) Doditur, ll.irold Sliuiii.iii, 
and Howard M i(-hels<jii which was en- 
tluisiastically received by the audience. 
"Tiiree Hoys and a (iuitar" was the title 
of a trio composed ot Henjaniin VVein- 
bertjer, Joseph Zillnian, and Harry liern- 
stein. The trio ren<lere(l several pojuilar 
sonns. Charles Daniels and Albert 
IJodjje were the participants in a wrestling 
match of fifteeti minutes duration. Neither 
one was di-clared vi(tor by Judge Lester 
Williams, until Charles Daniels secured 
a fail in a match of three minutes. IVank 
Small was the referee. 

The College C.lee Club under the 
management of David CosgrilT and the 
direction of \V. ( irant Duidiam gave its 
first public concert at the Revue. They 
sang four numbers- Dear Old Mnssuchu- 
n-tti, The Old Man Who Satd '•\\'cll," 
Shttdtnc March, and Winter Son^. Thurl 
Brown and Nelson Heeler with Rol)ert 
Noble at the piano presented llieir 
dance skit under the title of "Silent 
Movers." A male quartet coni|>oscd of 
William Mnller. Roger HIackburn, Sulo 
Tani, and Miles Hoylan siing four num- 
bers of the semi-classical type. 

Margerite Ford and Harold Shuman 
presented an exhibition waltz after Miss 
Ford gave a toe dance. The concluding 
act was a group of numbers by the 



College Hand under the (lire«t ion of W. 
(.rant Dunham. The numbers were: 
On the Mall by (loldinan, National Cdory 
overture by Kind, and the Stars and 
Stripes Forever by Sousa. 



IIOLRAN M:W LEADFR 

OF MAROON AND WHITE 
(Continued from Pag* 3) 

Frigard, Zielinski, Nassif, and Javorski. 
The junior varsity squad is coached by 
Daniel J. l.eary, leatler of the Maroon 
and White football eleven for the |)ast 
s.-ason, an<l includes the following players: 
Minerik. Cowan, Cenest, McKelligot, 
Harris, M. Davis, MuIUr, Thayer, llager, 
Landis, Sibson, Kingsbury, FLlliot, O'Brien 
McC.av, R. Taft,and R. Davis. 



"PEG O' MY HEART" 

TO BE WINTER PLAY 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

peopb, it will hold a pleasant memory, if 
properly revived. 

There have been to date f(»ur inquiries 
concerning ofT-campus presentations of 
the play, and it is probable that there 
will be at least three or four which will 
materialize. Following is the cast: 
Mrs. Chichester Ruth Redman ;.34 

Footman VMoi. Landsman J4 

Ethel, Mrs. Chichester's daughter 

Janice Munson A.i 
Alaric, Mrs. Chichester's son Theodore I-aw '■.<,& 
Christian Brent Nathaniel Hill .54 

Peg Shirley McCarthy .34 

Montgomery Hawkes. solicitor Thurl Brown |:»4 
Maid Mae\\einer 3fi 

jerry Warren bouthworth '.54 

l^nderstudies: Sylvia Wilson '33 and Marguerite 
Ford '36 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

DECEMBER 12-17. 1932 

Monday, l>ec. 13, i-4 p.m. 

Freshman Course 4 Hort MfK 61 HM UO 

114 Land .\rch .-iO \VH 

Mill Cn A I'hysiol 63 M 2K 

Draw 30 VVII Ag Knu 75 111 

Mil •J.') G Aud Ag Kng 7H 1 13 

Hot ."/I CH H Bact s2 M 27 
Km M KB K 

Tuesday, Dec. 13, H.liS-IO.lS a.m. 



Agron 1 113 

(ierman 4 O 2H 

Hort 1 F 209. 102 

K.ig 2^ 

C. Aud. 20, CH A 
Bot :*s 
Kng 64 
Knt r>-i 



Orient 1 

<; Aud, CH 
Forestry 55 
French 50 

F.C 25 
Mr. Glick 
110, 111 



Flori 50 F 106 

Math .50 MB c; 

Phys ,50 I'L B 

I'oni .53 F 210 

Ag lU! K\ 1 1 4 

CH B Farm Mgt 75 102 

110 Hort MIg SI HM 110 

KB K I'liys Kd 71 F Ed 

Tuesday, I0..t0-I2.30 ir. 

Zool 69 EB O 

A, FB D AgKnK82 110 

F 210 I'hys Ed 74 P F^d 
F KW 
Tuesday, 3-4 p.m. 

Mr. Mackimmie 

G Aud, 26. 28 

113,114 Poult .50 212 



Wednesday. Dec. 14, H.I.S-10.1S a.m. 



rH» THfATin- ^^ 



Thurs.-Fri.. Dec. 8-9 



Janet (iay nor— Charles F'arrell— in 

"TESS OF STORM 
COUNTRY" 



Saturday, Dec. 10 

Charles Laughton 
Maureen (V.Sullivan — in 

"PAYMENT DEFERRED" 



Monday. Dec. 12 

PAUL MINT 
— in — 

"I AM A FUGITIVE 
FROM A CHAIN GANG" 



Tuesday. Dec. 13 

DOIC.LAS FAIRBANKS 

— in — 

MR. ROBINSON CRUSOE" 



Wednesday. Dec. 14 

PAT O'BRIEN— in 

"AIR MAIL" 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that'8 the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goo«1year Welt System Emjiloyetl" 

FISHER'S 

P A J A M A S 

X'elveteen 
Corduroy 
Terrycloth 
Rayon 
. Crepe 

Broadcloth 

$1.00 to $4.50 



C,cr'2H G 2« Hi.st .50 

.\k Kd 52 c; And Hist .54 

An Hiis .50 102 Clu-m HO 

Bact 60 CH A I-and Arch 75 

Kiig(i5 no I'om 75 

Flori .53 F ItW 

Wednesday. 10.30- U..)0 n>. 



F 209 

212 

G 2H 

\VH B 

F 102 



HARVARD B.ASKETEERS 

WILL PLAV M.S.C. HERE 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

chusetts State last \i'ar and Coarh Ellert 
will send his strongest combination 
agaitist the Engineers to seek revenge. 
Vale, Conn. Aggie, Vermont, and Har- 
vard are newcomers on the Maroon and 
White list. 

The complete schedule, as compiled by 
Manager I'arker I.. Sis.siin, is as follows: 

Jan. 10 Yale at New Haven 
11 Clark, here, S p.m. 

Middlebiiry, here, 8 p.m. 



Feb 



12 -.. - . 

18 Williams, here. 8 p.m. 

21 

28 

31 

4 

8 
11 



Conn. .XKKie, here. 8 i).m. 
New Hampshire at Durham 
Si)rin«tii'ld at Sprinntield 
Hamilton at Clinton, N.V. 
I'rovidence, hi-re. 8 p.m. 

.. W-rmont, here. 8 p.m. 

15 Tufts, here, H p.m. 

22 Amlierst at .\iulierst 

24 Harvard, here, S p.m. 

28 Worcester, here, 8 p.m. 



(hem 1 G Aud. 26. 28 I'hy.s 25 PL B, CH A 
t him 4 G Aud. KB D 

Wednesday, 2-4 p.m. 

102 Hort .50 F 209 

P Ed Bact 75 M 47 

P Fd Dairy 76 FL O 

CH B Ent 83 EB K 

EB H I^nd Arch 81 WH 

EB B Pom 80 F 210 
316 



15. 8.15-IO.IS a.m. 

French 75 F 106 

Home F:c 81 EB K 

Poult 76 312 



Soils SI 
Ak Eng SI 
Flori S;j 
Fruit S4 
Poult S7 
SoiU S5 



Home Ec 1 
Phys Ed 2 
Phys Ed 25 
Bot .50 
|i:nt .5.3 
Geol .50 
Home Ec 46 

Thursday, Dec 

Eng 1 

.Miss Beaman FL 204 

Mr. Barnard li Aud 

Mr. Patterson 114 

Mr. Prince 102 

.Mr. Rand 12 

Mr. Troy F 209 

(hem 2<» G 28 

(hem 61 G 26 

AnHu3 75 110 

Bot 81 <"H A 

Thursday. 10..30-12.3O m. 

Fremh 28 F 102 Flori 7.5 

Home Ec 28 111 Oleri 75 

Hon 25 WH B 

Poult 25 312 Dairy SI 

Ai{EnK51 no VKGdSl 

A«ron 50 102 An Hus S3 

Bot 58 ( H B Ent SI 

Zool 65 EB (i Hort S7 

Ak Ed 79 114 Poult S3 

Ent 76 EB K 

Thursday, 2-4 p.m. 

Zool 26 EB D. K. H Ak Ec SI 

Hort MfR 51 HM 110 Flori S<> 

Hort S4 

Ag Opport SI Uri 

Friday, Dec. 16, 8.1S-10.I5 a.m 

French 1 F 102 Ent 79 

French 4 CH A Home Ec (6 

■\k Ed 55 *"» And Vet 75 

(hem 51 G26. 2H 

EnK 60 102 Bact SI 

(rt-r.50 111 Flori S2 

Oleri .51 F210 SoiU S4 

Phys .5:1 PL B Ar EnR S2 

S<x- .50 S Sem Forestry SI 

Ar Ec 77 1 10 Poult S6 

"AgEd76 114 



Aud 
212 
102 
210 
113 
20 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

14 MAIN STREET 
Between Town Hall and Masonic Buildlnft 

MEN'S WHOLE SOLES and %J^ 7C 

RUBBER HEELS *^.^i» 

MEN'S HALF SOLES and 

RUBBLR HEELS 

MEN'S RUBBER HEELS 

LADIES' HALF SOLES and 

RUBBER HEELS 



LADIES' RUBBER HEELS 
LADIES' LEATHER HEELS 

AJl Work Guaranteed 



1.50 
.40 

1.25 
.30 
.25 



Typiitg 
First CIa«s Work T.ow Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



PATRONIZE 
THE S.WDWICH MAX 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



Math 28 
Mr. Boutelle 
Mr. Machmer 

Oleri 25 

ScK- 27 

Ak Fc .50 

Ar Ed 51 

Ar Ed 85 

Bot 78 

(hem 75 



Friday, 10.30-l2..tO m. 

EuK 71 



MB G 
EB D 

F 210 

S S-m 

212 

113, 114 

102 

CH B 

G 26 



Ent 80 
Math 76 

Bus I-aw SI 
Ar EnK S:{ 
Dairy S;5 
Fruit S.5 
Hort S12 
\eR Gd S3 



Friday, 2-4 p.m. 



Draw 25 
(k-r 1 
Ger 25 

An Hus SI 
Flori SI 



WH 

G Aud 

G 26, 28 

113. 114 
F 102 



Poult SI 
Farm Mgt SI 
Fruit SI 
Fruit SIO 
Hort Mfg SI 



F 106 
F 210 

FL204 

F 209 

M 28 

EB D 

20 

113 



113. 114 
F 102 
WH B 



EB K 

113 
VL B 

M 2S 

F 106 

20 

12 

F 209 

312 



no. Ill 
EB K 
MB B 

G Aud 
12 

FL 204 
F 106 
CH A 
F 209 

102 

12 

F 106 

F 209 

HM 110 



LAST INFORM. \L OF TERM 

TO BE HELD THIS FRIDAY 
(Continued from Pafte I) 

con.sidcring these aijplieations he has not 
yet announced his final decision. The 
orchestra is a conglomeration of musical 
ability but Madinn says it is good. For 
some unknown reason the tickets wiil he 
s(jld under a new system. The price for 
an individual will he 40 cents, while the 
price per couple will he TA) cents. So if 
the boys can scraj)e up 10 cents extra 
"a good time will be had by all." 

— Try — 
THE YELLOW DIAMOND 

Prices Reasonable 

No Cover Charge 
Phone 632- VV 7 Northampton Rd. 



INFERCLASS ATHLETIC: BOARD 
ANNOUNCES NUMERAL AWARDS 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

letic FJoard also announced the dati i„r 
the interclass basketball games next i, rni 
as follows: On January 4. Stale FrLshiacn 
vs. State Seniors, SKxkbridge Fresh mtn 
vs. Stockbridge .Seniors, and State S; h„. 
mores vs. State Juniors. On Januar\ ."1. 
the semi-final will be played with the 
winner of the Sophonu)re-Junior - uue 
receiving a bye into the final, which will 
be pla\'ed January tl. 

The board awarded football nunu i,,!,, 
19.it), to the following men: Elnii r jj 
Allen, John McNally, Michael .An.i. ki. 
Edward .Soulliere, John I.. McCoiu hii-. 
Forrest D. Martin. Ralph T. .\(lanis, 
Frank Rose, (ieorge Munroe, Kmil j. 
Przystas, Paul Mandella. John E. Stewnrt, 
Arthur F. Hixby, Jack .Sturtevant, Ran- 
d()l|)h C. Barrows, Louis G. Haiznian, 
Emil J. Koenig, Francis A. Lord, DonaM 
M. Ballou, Myles C. Hoylan, and Cliarks 
L. -San Cleniente, Manager. 

For the first time in its history, the 
board awarded s<x-cer numerals, lit.}."), to 
the following men: Edward L. Packard, 
Walter Raleigh, Robert H. \Vo«m1, Frank 
Eaton, John P. X'eerling, VValttr S 
Mozden, Joseph Miller, Clayton H. 
(ieorge, Bernard J. Doyle, (".eorm- S 
Congdon, Curtis M. Clark, Ralph Eaton 
Norris, Ronald C. Mall(x:k, and .Mired 
E. Cox, Manager. 

The board also voted to award cross 
country numerals, WYM, to the following 
men: Raymond Prtxtor, Philip Miner. 
ThecKlore \V. Kerr. Jr., William \\. Hamr. 
Jr., Walter Lewis, William (Itxldard. Jr, 
Carl F". Dunker, and Gordon H. Bishop. 



COLONIAL INN 

C.OOD FOOD — REDUCED RATES 
WEEKLY BOARD $0.00 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
''Let Dave do it'' 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 
Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



Saturday. Dec. 17, 8.I5-I0.15 a.m. 



Math 1 
Mr. .Mdrich (i 26 

Mr. Boutelle 

G Aud 



Math 28 (Mr 



KB K 

F 102 



Everything in Hardware 

and Radio Equipment 

— PHILCO= 



Mr. Machmer 
Mr. Markuson 
Mr. Moore 

MB G. D 
Hist 28 

Saturday 

Fngti^h 28 
Mr. Barnard 
Mr. I'rince 

Ag Ec 80 
Ag Ed 78, 80 
Bot 7.5 
15airy 79 
Ent 8.') 
Hort Mfg 71 
Music. 7."), 50 
I'hvs 7.'), 8.'} 



. 28 

114 

12 



.■\g Ec .54 
Mil 50 
Pub Spk M 
Span 30 
Eng 75 
Mil 75 
Soc 7.5 

tO..)IO-12.30 m. 

Mr. Rand 
G Aud Mr. Troy 

ii:{. 114 
By Arranjlement 

Poult 80 
Span 7.5 
Soc- 76, 79 
Zool 75. 85 
Ag Eng 8:J 



Moore) 

MBG 

102 

DH A 

111 

F 106 

MB B 

DH B 

S Sem 



G 26 



GOTHAMETTES 

The New Run Proof Silk Hose — $1.35 /wtr 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE PRICES 

Owf Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guarantfta 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 
for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST. • MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



Eng SI 
Home Ec S5 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



FACULTY NOTES 

President Rost oc Thatcher left recently 
for Florida where he will s[)end the 
winter. He is exi>eeted to return to the 
college ill -^prii when he will take up his 
duties as research professor in agricul- 
tural chemistry. 

Dr. Charles Frakcr, Professor of French 
at the college and formerly teacher in the 
Philippine Islands, has loaned a collection 
of Philippine handicraft material to the 
Jones I-ibrary wheie it is now on exhibi- 
tion. 

Preliminary lonferences with the hud- 
^t t oIVk i lis of the state government indi- 
cate that the appropriations of the legis- 
lature for the next fiscal year beginning 
December 1 will be considerably reduced 
from thoM' <>l the year just closing. Cer- 
tain stringent economy measures which 
were put in force last year as emergencies 
will have to be continued. These in.dude 
the dis<ontinuanre of professional im- 
provement tr,i\el and the restriction re- 
garding the employment of special lec- 
turers. 



COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Collegiate Sportwear for Men and Women 

Riding Habits, Boots, Hilcing and Sport Jacket: 

We give free carfare with purchases of $.5.00 or up 




THE CANDY KITCHEN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 



SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 



INCORPORATED 



T A CURRENT EVENT IN jjj, 
•y* THE COLLEGIAN ^^ 

4* 



TrusteCK to conblder raUe in 
(iiltlon. S«e editurlaL 






Vol. XLIII 




A. C. liibrr.ry. 

lan 



OUT.STANDINt; EVENT *V* 
OF THE WEEK .A» 



The tiiilKlaiiillnA evt>ni of 
Ihv we«>k I. uwurilfii (i> the 
Jliiiv\ i'liivt*rN' iirodiii lUiiiof 
ihv tiiu> "Kluriivr In ihv Ke<J 
llurn" It) u tU|iucil> 
it utl tenia 



AMHERST MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 19.^3 



Number 1 1 



Barnard Opens Series of 
Literature Discussions 



Tuesday Eveninjl Lectures Sponsored 
|)V Department of Enftlisih 



Thai the principles which apply to the 
ciiiiii^ni of literature apply with ({iiial 
forte to all other i>lias«s()f human thoujiht , 
ttli.ihtr that thought is in religion, in 
|iliilo-')|)hy, in science, or an\ of the fine 
or practical arts, was stressed by Mr. 
Kll~wnrth Barnard of the Department of 
Iji-li-h in his treatment of "Critirism of 
l.ilf .iTid Literature" in Stockbridge Hall 
\(>tt rday evening. Mr. Barnard's s(Ke( h 
was I lie first of the season's series of dis- 
ui-»i'iiis siH)nsore<l by the English de- 
pariinent and given by the various niem- 
1„ r> <•! the de[)artment on Tuesday 
ivciiiiins at ():4.T. 

Mr. Barnard outlined fhe various 
imthiKls of criticism of literature and 
interpretations of life. He descrilK-d the 
(Continued on P«A« 2, Column 4) 



Dr. Barbour Addresses 
Sunday Chapel Assembly 

"By faith, Abraham, when he was 
called to a place he should receive as 
inheritance, went out, not knowing 
whither he went" — so we go into the 
rtuionsof the new year, said Dr. Barl)our, 
President of Brown University, a<ldressing 
the first Sunday Cha|K'l of the term on 
J,inuary 8. From the answer to the 
(|uesiiun of what lies on the other side 
ol the hill, has come the growth of 
natifttis, tril>es, empires, history, and 
<(<)^;r.iphy. Just as the settlers along the 
.\tlaiitic gradually ventured by stages to 
the r.i(it"ic, so we go into new territory 
.i> we enter upon the new year. \Ve go 
oui "not knowing whither we go." 

Thi> uiKcrtainty a|)plies to the great 
Imsiness of living with which we are all 
oimerned. There are vast regions lic- 
yimd the horizons of our present intel- 
intu.il life, but too many jx-ople imagine 
ih.ii iluy are thin»cing when they are 
iiierely rearranging their prejudices. Such 
;«op!i' are sta\ing near the Atlantic and 
n main at the mercy of demigods. Find- 
ing iiiii what lies lK"yon«l the horizon of 
.nt.llf, tual life is what makes life worth 
living. According to Dr. Barbour, Irom 
the lime one gives himself to the study of 
truly ureal things, the lesser things seem 

'i' I!) and vulgar. 
" iking of the realm of the senses, he 
flat one who <loes not go beyond the 
- nf mu^ic, misses one of the finest 
Continued on Pafte 4, Column 2) 



< HRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

SUNDAY DKSCUSSIONS 

li't ( liri-<tian .\-sociation under the 

leadir-hip of Benton Cummings, presi- 

I lie organization, inauguratetl a 

"'"' "I Sunday afttrnoon imelings 

w'hifh he^an last Sunday. The >ubject 

' ' ' • i'l us.,ion which took the form of 

"1 "iK.li tDnim was "Is There a (iod?" 

^'M Sunday the mecing will be held 

Memorial Building at 2:30. The 

"11 whi( h will center arounfl the 

■ "Can One Let His Conscience 

uifle?" will Im- under the dircc- 

i M ilcolm Fowler. 



< OLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

-vi 'importunity for all thor-e who are 

intin Mfd in extra-curricula activities, 

' '■ Lirly journalism, will be offered 

next week when the competition for 

'■'"'i'l to the editoriil board of the 

.»; begins. Any male students 

»n th. four-year course will hje welcome. 

'■ work require*! will cover a 

"1 ei^ht weeks during which 

H'l' ai newspafjer assignments such as 

^'t"i-i.il>, news stories and the like will 

"tulud. E!e;tions will be made on 

titive basis. 
iiH- tir^t m<eting will Ije held Tucs- 
"iriry 17, at 7::}0 p.m. in the 
Building. 



'Us 

M 



REPORT SHOWS STATUS 
OF COLLEGE FINANCES 

Many Receivinii Aid. Total Expendi- 
tures Cut 

(In a series of articles, the Boston 
Evenin'i Transcript is presenting the 
financial condition of the leading New 
England colleges in their attempt to 
weather the present fin;iii(ial crisis. Re- 
sponding to a re(|uest from that news- 
pajH-r for a financial rvytort Secretary 
Hawley prepared the following article.') 

The income of the Massachusetts 
State College is derived chiefly from 
api)ropriation of State funds although 
approximately $1S(),(KH) is received each 
year from federal grants and the income 
from approximately $lo(),(MK) in trust 
funds is available. All receipts from fees 
and sale of products are returned to the 
State Treasury and, in effect, ofTset 
appropriations. In the fiscal year just 
closed these amounted to $274,()(K). In 
19.'n appropriations for maintenance and 
capital expenditures amounted to $1,257, 
705 while in 1<.>;J2 they decreased to 
$1,201,050. This decrease was entirely 
due to a reduction of the State appro- 
priation. We shall not know what funds 
will be available from State sources for 
the current fiscal year which iK-gan 
December 1, VXVl until appropriations 
are made by the Legislature of \\Y.V.\. In 
the meantime we are limiting our monthly 
expenditures to one-twelfth of the ap- 
projjriation of last year. 

These funds jirovidc for the several 
educational activities of the State College 
which include resident instruction of 
undergraduate level, graduate courses 
and short non-degree courses; the Ex- 
periment Station for agricultural re- 
search; the Control Service for the en- 
forcement of certain l.iws pertaining to 
the .Agricultural industry and the Ex- 
tension .Service in agrii ulture and home 
economics. In all of these departments 
the demand for ser\i< e has inc reased and 
we ha\e tried to meet this demand with 
decreased funds. The pressure has been 
particularly great in resident instruction. 
.Student enrollment increased 211^ last 
year, 1% this year and during the last five 
>ears it has inc reased .'ilT. In that same 
(Continued on PaHe 4, Column i) 

I 3 Faculty Members 
Attend Scientific Meeting 

Atlantic City Scene of Convention 

riiirttt n members of the teaching anci 
exfKrimenl station stafi of the college 
attended the meeting of the Ameiican 
Assoc iat ion for the .-Xdvancement c f 
Science in .Atlantic- City cluring (he 
Christmas holitlays. 

Several of the profc s^mrs read ()aixrs 
Ix-fore the- various .actions of the con- 
yention. Dr. Arthur Beaumont, pro- 
fessor of Agronomy, Dr. H. \V. Davis, 
professfjr of plant pathology and ni>- 
cology. Dr. Carl Feller^, research pro- 
fessor in horticultural manufactures, and 
.\rthur French. as:>i>tant professor of 
|)omology presented papers concerning 
original research work in the ir resfjective 
fields. 

Other members cjf the staff to attend 
included; Jacob Shaw, and Oliver Frenc h 
of the department of pomology; -Arthur 
Bourne of the department ol entomology 
who is secretary of the entomobgicai 
society; John Blague Erne>t Smith, 
Paul Isham. and .Mi( h.iel O'Connor of 
the horticultural manufactures depart- 
ment; Oran Boyd and Ih rlnrt Bergm.m 
of the research dejiartment. 

The Association for the Advancement 
of Science is made up of more than fifty 
various scientific sck ieties and their 
annual meetings are attended by more 
than several thousand scientists from all 
p,irts of the nation. 




Trustees to Consider 

Raise in College Tuition 



Willard Raymond Ward '^^ 



WARD RESIGNS AS 

COLLEGIAN HEAD 

Committee to Direct Until New 
Editor is Picked 

Ik-cause of ill-health, Willard Raymond 
Ward 'Xi resigned from his fiosition as 
editor-in-chief of the Massazhusetts Col- 
legian. Until a new editor is chcjsen 
Alfreda L. Ordway "A'.i, Eugene (luralnic k 
".V.i, and Raymond Royal "AA will serve 
on an editorial committee to direct the 
|M)lic ies of the sc hool publication. 

W. Raymond Ward was elected editor- 
in-chief following the resignaticm of 
Joseph Politella last October. Even at 
that time, Ward felt that his hc-alth 
would not iH-rmit him to carry on the 
duties of the editorship along with his 
studies and his other activities, but as 
the members of the- editorial bcjard had 
dwindled down to three seniors, he w.is 
|>ersuaded to assume the duties of the 
|K)sition. He served as editor-in-chief 
from the first of October until the final 
issue of the fall tc-rm l>efc»re his ill-health 
finally forced him to resign as editor and 
from further aclivt- participation on tin 
.-c hool pa|x'r. Ward has sc r\fd as a 
memlxr of the Massachusetts Collegian 
for more th.in three- \ears an<l previous 
to his election a-> e ciiior-in-c hief he- w.is 
the managing editor, lie-ides his work 
on the C'olleditin, W.arcl is piisidcnt of the- 
International Relations (lull and a 
memlHr of the LiU ral Club, the Christian 
Association Cabine t , and i he- < )iitinK Club. 

UNUSUAL PICTURES 

NOW ON EXHIBITION 

Old Dutch Peasant CoKtumes IIIuh- 
t rated in Present Series 

Old Dutch (easiint costumes illustrated 
b\ an inure ting and different series of 
p.iintinj^s arc- on exhibitiejn in the .Memej- 
rial Building. These pictures were- re- 
ceived from the American Federaticm of 
.Arts in Washington through Professor 
Frank -A. W.oikIi who arr.iiiKi 'I the ex 
hibition. 

F-'orty-one unusii.d and attrac tive paint- 
ings in brilliant colors represe-nt Diitc h 
costumes of several jh tIckIs anel IcMalitii s 
Besides Ixing of great liistejrieal ititerest. 
the paintings are of artistic Uauty as 
well. They are of value tej stuelents of 
ecjhtuine design, it Ix-ing well known that 
the- old jicasant costumes are constantly 
elrawn u(K)n for man\' ideas in modern 
fashions. 

Cos*. ..ities. both eonteiit|K)r,ir\ and 
those- no longer we»rn, from the epiainl. 
old \ill.iv(es of Holland, such as ilineje-l- 
oopen, Frieslancl, Zee-land, and .Vlarken 
Island are- of intricate <lcsit{ti. The- faces 
of the nie-n, woiiic-n. .uicj children in 1 he- 
|)aintin^'s have furnisheel amusement to 
m.inv who have- -'en i he- exliibii ion. 

J. Paul Williams to 

Address Sunday Chapel 

J. Paul Williams. riire(t«»r of religious 
work at the college and also a member 
of the Department of History, will sjK-ak 
at Sunday Chaixl. January 15. Mis s(d»- 
j<-ct will In- "The Effertive Power for 
Ac hieving an Integrated Life. 

Since his graduation from B.iker I'ni- 
ve r-ity in l'.^22 Mr. Williams has l>ecn 
taking an active part in re Iigif)iis work. 
(Continued on Page 4, Column I) 



DEBATERS UNDERTAKE 
DIFFICULT SCHEDULE 

Co-eds to Have Narslty Team and 
Outside Contests 

Confronting the X'arsity debating team 
this year is the most extensive and ri^cir 
ons schedule that was ever ariangecl. 
There are ten deluites listed for the men's 
tc .1111, an increase of four over last \ear, 
while the eo-eel team has seeuieel three- 
contests with other women's scK-ielies. 

The- high s|>ot of the se-ason will be a 
four-day torn tlirou),(li the S)uth during 
the spring vacation when the debaters 
will meet five colleges. Unfortunately 
there- will only be- three meetings t)n 
campus. The-re is a |M»ssibilit\' that two 
debate-s will 1m- broadcast so that the 
college- will not entirely mi.ss forensic 
e-nlertainment . 

On January 18, the varsity team will 
give a debate- before the- llolyoke \.M. 
C.A. Both sides ejf the- dispute on "The 
Cancellation of War Debts" will Ix- 
taken by dilfe-reiit memlM-rs of the- team. 
Two old ejp|K)nents, Springfield College 
anel the Ameriean International ColU-ge, 
will 1m- met February 10 at .Springfield. 
Last \ear the M.S.C. me-n held a no- 
dee ision contest with the former anel won 
from the latter. Both arguments will Im- 
on the "Ke-connition of Russia." State- 
eleb.iteis will .ippear on campus to op|K>se 
I he "Cane ellat ion of War Debts" in a 
elcb.ilc- with Bowelciii). This will be .'it 
.S p.m., I'c'bru.iry 14. 

Much te-rritory will Ik- coven-el to 
meet the senilhern colleges. The- tour 
will include- Rutgeis I'niversit y e»n March 
21, Muhlenlierg Ceille-ge on March 22, 
I'nive-rsitv of Marvl.ind on March 2.'{. 
A debate- at 2..J0 p.m., March 24. with 
the University eif Pe-nnsylvania will Im- 
(Conllnupd on Page 2, Column .<) 



Hoard Will Meet on January l'> to 
Make Final Decision 

The S|M-cial Legislative Commission 
on slate anel municipal expendiliires has 
recomtnendi tl to the Bo.ird of Trustees 
of the college that the tuition be- im reased 
from sixty to one hundred dedlars for 
slueh-nts from the htale and from one 
huneliecl and eighty to thice hundred 
dollars for out of state students. At their 
semi annual meetiiiK in Boston on Jan, 
lit, the Board of Trustees will vote to 
accejit t)r reject this recommendation. 

Should the- Board of Trustees reject 
this recommendation, it is ex|K'cted that 
the S|)c.ial Coniniissie^n will introduce a 
bill into the Legislature providing for 
such an increase. If pa.ssed the bill will 
go into effect in September of this year. 
The present tuition charge was set by 
(Continued on Pag* 4. Column I) 

BERTHE HEBERT GIVES 
RECITAL AT ASSEMBLY 



(Costumes Add Color t<i Prodram of 
Kulk Sunfts 



J 



itney Players Present 
Evening of Novel Drama 

'Murder in the Red Barn" ThrillH 
Capacity Audience 



".An evening c»f rare elelinht," as l he- 
New V'ork Evenitifi, World «x(>resM-h it 
well de-sefibes last Frie|;iy nielli, January 
r>, at whie h lime- a large- aiidie-nce- hissed 
the villain and a[>plaude-d the heroine in 
llie |M-ifc>rnianc e- of "The- Murder in ihe- 
Re-(| Barn," by John Latimer, plave"'! at 
Bowke r Aiielitorium. 

L'niepie- in the line ejf .Social Union 
entertainments presented on catnpus this 
comeely me lf)drama tif 1S40 ke pt an e n- 
ihusiastic- aiidienee in laughter for two 
hours. The Jitney Players, direete-d by 
David Elliott, ably pre-st-nteel this m« lo- 
'Iranta of the- "gcjoel ejlel clays." 

Particular ereelit giMS lei Willi. im 
("order, the villain. Mister Marten, t he 
"hone-st rustic," and .Maria .Marten, the 
le-ailinn Ia«lv. f)tlic-r e li.irae t<-rs whose- 
[H rfcrmances were v-C'" rally e njoye e| 
kS( II the Gypsy; Tim Bobbin, the- e-omt* 
dian; and ,Annc- Marten. From (he 
village- green, to the- wooel, tf> the- Reel 
B.irn, to the scaffejl'l, ili<- sc e-ne- shifted 
with liv,'htning rapielily. 

By way ejf divert isemerit , between the- 
.icts, the- company pre-sente-d ".\I.m t he- 
Life Bo.its" by tientlemcn of the Com- 
(iiiny, "The Fatal We-cMing," a te-ticjr solo 
by a come-'li.in, .inel "Cf)nie. Birdie-, 
Come" by a mixe-d epiarte t i allowing 
is a list of fhe characters: ; 

William (ejrder, son of the? Sfjuire- flli-.iv, I^e-afl) ' 

Mi-itc-r Marten, an lion«-st rustic 'n<-av-y Fath»-r) I 

John Maroney I 
Istimapl \jp*. :i f«yi»sy fSrrond Hf-avy .Man) i 

e tmrloc Krarlo^lca | 
pharo- I ■ "H luvcinlf U-ail) 

e tiarlf-! Kraeloslca 
Mark. <»yp»y 'Wallting (ie'ntle-man^ 

l^-*- e rowe 
Tim Bot»V>in M-'ifet I./>w Come-rlian; 

Marrifon Dowd 
Flatf at< her & TolxTfloii^r (Showm»-n at Fair) 

Sam I'earee- & het Oowe 
Maria Marten flx^ding I^ady) Alice (.hene?y 

lytmf Marten 'C harac ler (M I-ady) F.llen l>ovr 
Anne- Marten f( hamt»er .Vlaid) Helen Morrow 

Vveite (I'tility .Maid) Barl»ara Benedict 



Bert he- HelM-rt, V(>r8atile mezzo-con- 

ir.dlo, pie-se-nte-el :i cr)stume re-cital of 

foreign .iiid Ameiican c harae tc-r folk songs 

at the lirst assembly of the- winter te-rni 

January II. Colciifiil costumes added 

gieatlv' to the- ciramatic inlerpie tat ions 

in iMitli French .md English. Miss 

HelM-rl was brought he-re- at the reepic-st 

ol I'lofesseir < •oding anel under t In- 

aiispices *\ the c-cill«>ge-. The- varieel 

selections ine luclt-el the- following: 

1 
SonKH of tlic- A|i|>alac liian Mr>iin(;iin!i 
iKc-iitcii ky-Niiiili c .ttoliiiu) 
Tlie- N'iuiiiliitiiili- i-'nKli'<li f>ri«In 

l.itlle- SiMrfKW S (III h ( 'riKiii 

1 Ik- Wi-ililinK of .Mi*'-< l>iii k iUUU Origin 

II 
liiniane lie- a l.'Aeilire 

MiiiK'l I>(ivrlt Howard 
SmRH iif Hte-iiin Folk Arr liy Tlie-o Kotrcl 

l>o iwlit (iii-Koiii- e liililti-ii'n S<inK 

\a' iiiiiik jjeilt InciKe de Clioli-I Stililicr SoilK 

Arr. t)y liourKacill-DeiKoinlray 
l,a iiiie-rc 'le-x Ar/onnais I'aiilun Song 

!.«■ wiiiix- ail lail Wi-ddiiiK Song 

III 
CowlHiy.-i' Itre-akdowii r>iiion 

Muriel I.OVI-C I How, lid 
< owlioy Kalliidic (jf Texa.s 
l>OKii- Smik 
HoIlM- on iIm- KaliKe 

* lid I'.iiiii, ilii' e ow-Horiir 
Tlu- OviiiK I oAlioy 
K<iiind<-<l t ')> in (ilory 

WO.MKN'S LITTLE 

.SYMPHONY ORCHIS IRA 

In the- Weiiiien's l.ilile- Sv inphony 
Orchestra of Boston, (ilaying here next 
Siinelay .'ifternoejii at .'{..'tO p.m. imelcr the 
auspices of .S>e i.d I'nion. the- e.impiis is 
e)fferee| an unusual opfKirt unity tei he-ar 
good music. The- orche-stra. (e)m|Hiv((| nf 
sixtce-n nic-mlM-rs. is a well known kioii|i 
which apiie-ars fie-e|ue-nllv' in .tiiel about 
Boston. .Nicolas Slonimsky wliei c e»rii|iie-»H 
the- orchestra is a me-mlM-r o( the- Boston 
Symphony .inel has eondiie-tc-d the Cham- 
be r Club. 

Sloiiimsk> w.is born in Ru.ssia and 
came tej America in I5>2.'{ to the Fliisiman 
School f)f Miisie . He- came- to lioston in 
1025 and has eoritribiite-d tc> the Boste»n 
T.vemttf^ Tmnssript, The A mencan Mercury, 
The Academy if .\fu\tc, and other piibli- 
1 .it ions. 



CAMPUS CALE.NDAR 



Srtw tkt Sem Year rtvifing old d*firt\. 
1 he Ihiiughlful Siml to 'iilituiie relim. 
-Huhiyal nf Omar Khayyam 

l-it^i^ftatd 

Thuritelay, January 12 

HrCjOi, II) \,ir-(ity Uasketball: .Mi Idle-tjury 
iiere; 
Friday, January l.t 

\'.ir^ity II'H !(>•>■ : K.itea at I.ewiston 
Saturday, January 14 

N'ar-'ity llwkey: Colby at Waterloo n 

"Vii;" Parties 
.Sunday, January IS 

9:00 am. Sunday ( haH- J I'a'i' VVUIi.imi 

'l.'Miit.m. ( hriKtian Aswxiation Uisrunion, 
Memorial Hall 

.'J:.'{e) p.m. SfKial t'nkin. Women's Uttle 
Symiiliony e)riliestra. Ikjwker Aud 
Monday, January lb 

UA'i i> III V'.VV.e .\ ( abinct Meeting 
Tuesday, January 17 

6:4.') pni. LanKiiage and Literature. Mr. 
Troy. Room 1 1 t, Stockbridge 

7 :M) p.!).. ( oll.--.iian ( ompctition 
Wednasday, January III 

4:Uei p.m. ( ollegian Distribution 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY U, 1933 







/nbassacbueetP CoUeQian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusttts State College, Published every 
Thursday by thi- students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Kditnrial Commit tM 

EUOENE GURALNICK "M AlKKKDA L. ORDWAY "33 RAYMOND ROYAL "34 

EUCBNB GURALNICK '33 Alfrbda L. Ordway '33 

ilanotint Editor Associ<M Editor 

DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 

Campua Athletlca 

Raymond Royal '34, Editor Theodore M. Lsary '35 

Alfrxda L. Ordway '33 Sila« Little. Jr. 'M 

Ruth D. Campbell '34 Glen Shaw 30 
Harriette M. Jackson '34 
Mary L. Allen '35 

David L. Arenberg '35 - .. ^ 

Elizabeth K. Harrwgton 35 Eich«ii4«« 

Ediih Parsons 36 . Alfreoa L. Ordway '33. EdUor 

FMltUf* 

Stanly F. Sbperski '34 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
AdMrtisint Manafir 

Frank Batstone '34 

W. Lawrence Schenck '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ASHLBY B. Gurney '33 
Butiiuss Managtr 



BualncM AMlatanti 



John Ward '36 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
CirctUalioH Managtr 

Nelson Stephens '36 
George Pease '36 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 

as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. _^ 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of pOTtage provided for in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authoriied August 20. 1918. 



^ ^ 4^ EDITORIALS '^ ^ ^ 

AGAINST INCREASED TUITION 

There has come a recrudcscencf of the many arguments once promulgated 
against free public education. They arc now being usc-fl in support of the recom- 
mendation of the SfK'cial Let;islativc commission to the Board of Trustees that 
tuition be raised. Of greater weight than these once refuted arguments in the support 
of the Commission's recommendation is the serious condition of State finances. Ex- 
penditures must he reduced or otiu rwisc new sources of income must be found. Thus 
it appears not only justifiable and expecJiint but absolutely necessary to increase 
tuition in the present crucial situation. Yet we question the expediency and justice 
of such a move for we believe that the uhimale results of raising tuition must be of 
suflTicient benefit to olTsit any evil elTet ts such action might have. 

The first effect and perhajjs the most unfortunate is clearly described in this 
excerpt from a recent editorial in the Spriiigruld RepuUican. 

The recommendation that tuition be heavily increased at the Massachusetts 
State College must be studied with special reference to the fact that a large 
number of the students would be forced l)> such an increase to leave the institu- 
tion and seek jobs undir the present conditions of unemployment. The effect 
would be to throw those students into competition with the army of jobless 
already walking the streits and intensify especially the crisis of technological 
unemployment. 
If the money received from an increased tuition can justify the dropping of fifty or 
a hundred students from college, we advocate the adoption of the Commission's 
recommendation. If this additional money is of sufficient benefit to the state in the 
present crisis, we further advocate the adoption of that recommendation. With the 
dropping out of these unfortunate students and with a decrease in future enrollment 
necessarily caused by a high tuition fee the fifty thousand dollar income estimated 
on a constantly increasing enrollment shall shrink. In a budget of sixty million 
dollars (which is ever growing) the compjiratively small sum of fifty thousand dollars 
(which will ever grow smaller) cannot be so necessary as to sacrifice these students 
by relegating them to the numbers of the unemployed. 

There was no tuition charge at the college several years ago and in that way the 
college adhered to one of its primary attributes, free education. The fee of sixty 
dollars which was later established is practically negligible in comparison with the 
fees of other colleges. In the land grant colleges where free higher education began, 
the average tuition fee today is only sixty-one dollars and seventy cents and this 
figure includes the tuition of the great western and mid-western universities. Com- 
paratively then Massachusetts State College still is a school of free education. But 
with an increase in tuition it shall l>ecome a state college in name only. 

There are other methods of economizing and of securing the much needed funds 
beside the present plan. Professor Thomas Riggs of Teacher's College, Columbia 
University writing in the New York Times recently, outlined twelve ways and means 
by which savings may be made without injury to the college and without shifting the 
burden of the state to students and faculty. Among his ix)ints for the reduction of 
expendiiures are found these plans: elimination of waste and increase in administra- 
tive efficiency, elimination of the |)Oor and unfit teachers and students, enlargement 
of classes, and alwlition of courses without value. 

With more study the Legislative Commission most assuredly could have found a 
more expedient and effective way of saving money for the Commonwealth than an 
increase in the tuition of the State College. 



srME 



Remember freshmen that ahhough 
many are called, only a few are chosen— 
and nothing can be done about it. 

ss 

The case where a wife buys her hus- 
band a Christmas present and then sends 
him the bill for it, is paralleled by the 
case of the sophomore who sent his 
father a Christmas telegram and then 
reversed the charges. 

ss 

A professor on this campus told one of 
his classes that many of his stories are 
not believed by some of his pupils and 
there were some that he did not believe 
himself. Just another case of, "Vass you 
there Charlie?" 

ss 

The depression has finally reached the 
inhabitants of Tin Pan Alley. The song 
writers, instead of turning out song hits 
with such titles as "Penthouse Serenade," 
"Paradise," etc., are now writing about 
Old Shanties on Tumbledown Streets and 
Romance found at ten cents a dance. 

ss 

His blufT called. "The lad who scorns 
the lassies and razzes Cupid may really 
be covering up — down deep he may be 
worried because he thinks he has no sex 
apj)eal," states Professor Goodwin Wat- 
son of New York Teachers College. 

"We have many cases of men who feel 
that they have no personality (S.A.) — 
that they can't attract the opposite sex. 
Then the man makes believe he is not 
interested, that he is above being silly." 



^ 
* 



®n an& off the "Kow 



^ 
* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY II. 193.^ 



* 



"Woticee 



Echo from the finals: 

Question: "Give three characteristics 
of Chaucer." 

Answer: "(1) Good, (2) Bad. (3) In- 
tlifTerent." 

Now you guess whether or not he 
passed. 

— — ss 

Knute Rockne's famous remark to one 
of his football players that he was saving 
him for the Prom will not hold any 
longer at this Ohio College. Wilmington 
College dropped football Iiecause the 
sport did not pay for itself. On the other 
hand, Knox College, whose football team 
did not win one game, discontinued the 
Junior Prom as an economy measure. 
Now if the schools merged . . . ? 
■ ss- — • — 

It seems that it takes more than one 
year to orient some of our freshmen. 
ss — • — 

A junior is trying to sell or swap a 
co-ed's locker room ticket. In the big 
rush at the treasurer's office he received 
a yellow instead of a white ticket. Too 
bad he wasn't color blind. 



At the end of the second term rushing 
season, Monday, January 9, the houses 
have the following announcements: 

Phi Sigma Kappa has pledged the 
following men: Reilly, Congdon, Cook, 
Hartin, Soushier, Sullivan. All are mem- 
bers of '36. 

Q.T.V. has pledged Kenneth C. Miner 
•33, Michael Avacki '36, Daniel Balavich 
'36, Charles San Clement '36. Francis A. 
Lord '36. 

Kappa Sigma has pledged David 
Taylor '36, Fred Bull '36, J. Woolcott '36. 

Theta Chi announces the pledging of 
Roger Allen '36, Adin Hixon '36, Cannoll 
Johnson '36, Ted Kerr '36. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon has pledged John 
Dennis '34, Kenneth Cuthbertson '36, 
and John Sturtevant '36. 

Alpha Gamma Rho has pledged Ken- 
neth Farrell '36. 

Kappa Epsilon has pledged the follow- 
ing men: J. de Wilde Snow, and Lewis of 
the class of '36. 

Delta Phi Alpha has pledged Arthur S. 
Levine '35, and H. Atlas, L. Taizman. 
M. Baizman, J. Barton, M. Frank, I. 
Gottesman, A. Gold, S. Garber, L. Haffer, 
A. Kaufman, D. Klckstein, A. Michael- 
son, J. Rutstein, D. Permutter, A. 
Shulkin, M. Vidaborsky of '36. 

The sororities also announce their 
pledges in the freshman class: 

Sigma Teta Chi has pledged Helen 
Burns, Elva Britton, Dorothy Corcoran, 
Eleanor Fillmore, Marguerite Ford, Con- 
stance Hall, Virginia Kellogg, Priscilla 
King, Dorothy Masters, Katherine O- 
'Brien, Edith Priest, Beatrice Rafter, 
and Helen Reardon. 

Phi Zeta has pledged Ernestine Brown- 
ing, Frances Driscoll, Anne Flynn, 
Christine Habanson, Margaret Hutchin, 
son, Priscilla Ilartwell, Edythe Parsons, 
Maid Riggs, P'rancene Smith, Virginia 
Smith. 

Lambda Delta Mu announces the 
pledging of Harriet Andres, Louise Haley, 
Leonta Horrigan, Evelyn Makory, Doro- 
thy Nurmi, Ruth Ordway, Helen Sawyer, 
Marjorie Whitney and Mildred Hovery 
and Mary Kingston '35. 

Alpha Lambda Mu pledge<l Eilizabeth 
Boucher, Marion Bullard, Mary Cawley, 
Madelyn Chase, Mary Cooney. Alice 
Hopkins, Eloise Leonard, Elizalx'th Loa, 
Phyllis Macintosh, Marion Paulding, 
Virginia Stratton, and Sylvia Winsor. 



Owing to unavoidable circumstances 
the Amherst Community Concert pre- 
senting Tostha Seidel has been jjosj. 
poned until Wednesday evening, Feb. 22, 
at 8M p.m. 

Warren Miller, Oxford graduate and 
meml)er of the Labor Party, will fixak 
on "Behind Politics in England and 
America" at the Unity Church on Sunday, 
January 15, at 8 p.m. 

Since the hall at the Memorial Building 
has been closed indefinitely, Sunday radio 
concerts can not be heard there until 
further notice. 

Tuesday, January 17, at 6:45 p.m. in 
Stockbridge auditorium, Mr. Frederick 
S. Troy of the English department will 
talk on "Christian Platonism and the 
'Fairie Queene'." 

Through the kindness of the Depart- 
ment of Economics, History, and Soci- 
ology of the Massachusetts State College 
the Library has received copies of under- 
graduate theses of local interest as fol- 
lows: "Amherst Negroes," by B. Brain- 
ard Bell; "Old Industries of Sunderland," 
by Catherine N. Hubbard; and 'The 
Scotch-Irish in Pelham," by Margaret 
Boston. 



|; Stocllbri^GC | 



-ss- 



Theta Chi has been congratulating one 
of its members on his marriage announced 
last week. Dean Asquith was married to 
Miss Doris H. Redman, a student at the 
University of New Hampshire, on October 
29, 1932. 



Stockbridge will be represented in 
three sports this winter. Already tht 
hockey, basketball, and track candidates 
are working out under the rcs(H>ctive 
coaches. Eighteen men have reported to 
Coach Red Ball for basketball and a 
schedule has been partly completed. 

The basketball schedule as it is now: 

Jan. 24 American International College, here 

27 Agawam HikIi. there 

30 Hopltins .Vtadeiiiy, here 

Feb. 2 Open 

6 Turners Falls HiKh, here 

7 New Salem Academy, here 
1 1 Williston Aiademy, here 
14 VVestfield lliKh. here 

17 F:ssex AKrii ultural Schoo .there 

18 St. .Anselm's Frep, there 
21 Amherst High, here 

Twenty men have rejxjrted to Ernest 
Mitchell, coach for the Stockbridge can- 
didates and varsity goalie on the -State 
hockey team of last year. Outstanding- 
men who have had experience on other 
clubs are: Joseph Norris, Robert Hall 
Ed Ryder, Charles Godin, Robert Fulton, 
and Marshall Rice. A six-game schedule 
is being arranged with tentative date5 
already settled with Deerfield and Wil- 
liston academies. 



CALVIN COOLIDGE 

It is futile for us and presuniptuous of us to attempt an etiology of Calvin Coolidge. 
There can be no value in our exi)ressions of sorrow or sympathy with Mrs. Coolidge 
for real sorrow and real sympathy are beyond the power of expression, they lie within. 
Yet we cannot ignore the death of such a man especially when the life of that man 
was so inextricably woven into our times and our locality. Many of us saw him at 
his last public appearance, the inauguration of President King in November. 

From a study of his life and untimely death there are to be taken great truths 
not only of life but also of death. Through his destiny ran the many and varied 
forces that mold contemixjrary life and thought. In his destiny there are found the 
fates that bring to each of us success or failure. Most unfortunately in his phenome- 
nal life and sudden death, there lies tragedy . He was an ajwstle of prosperity and 
yet he lived to see his era pass into a period of [wverty under the administration of a 
man he highly commended. He was an earnest believer in the principles of the Re- 
publican party and he heard them ccmlemned as the causes of a financial calamity. 
He saw all his cherished jxilitical ideals discarded in the victory of the Democratic 
party. And finally he who had lived undramatically and simply, died dramatically 
and suddenly. His funeral attended by the dignitaries of state and nation though 
simi)le in service was pompons in aj^pearance. 

The age of sixty is a yoiithfid age in which to die in this |>eriod of advanced 
medicine. The nation's editors are complaining totlay that the life of C.dvin Coolidge 
was shortened by the t;reat burden of the Presidency. They ask .America to consider 
the price she <lemands of men who would be presiilcnt. That these writers are correct 
to a certain <le^ree cannot be doubted, but not only the burden of the presidency but 
thr furious pace of modern life is responsible for the early deaths of our great men. 
I \i was c\en depri\<'d of !i\int; lo t he end i>f his life. 



How many noticed the new curtains 
for the stage? . . The audience did as 
much acting as the Jitney players them- 
selves. . . They furnished the sound ef- 
fects. . . Murders arc not the only things 
that take place in old barns. . . What a 
male chorus for the Interfraternity Sing... 
The second one from the left recalled 
many such instances that have actually 
happened in the Public Speaking classes, 
only they were not so funny. . . The 
Jitney tenor soloist is almost as gootl as 
some of our crooners. . . But not of the 
class of dream singers. . . More of a 
nightmare type. . . And how that villain 
could take it! — ^ss 

Winter and winter sports are once 
more with us. Basketball is going full 
blast. Varsity, interclass, and inter- 
fraternity basketball teams are in full 
swing. The only way a fraternity team 
resembles the varsity is that it also has 
five men on a team. So[)hs are the class 
champs. . . Good swimming lately down 
at the rink. . . Diving l)oard will be set 
up next week. . . Red Ball has more men 
out for goalies than he has for the de- 
fense positions. . . Red has run out of 
pads, so the freshmen will have to use 
North College mattresses. . . . Dick 
Hammond, hockey captain, has a little 
memento of the Brown game. . . Its the 
mouse of his eye. . . Don't be frightened 
f)y the grunts and groans emitting from 
the Phys. Ed. building. . . It's only the 
wrestling squad having its daily neck- 
ing. . . Some fellows are taking a crack 
at the manly ,iit of self defent-e. . . This 1 
boxing (?) s(iuad i^ noticeable by the 
lack of art and absence of men. . . No! 
fraternity bowling league this winter, but i 
a volley ball league instead. . . Did you ' 
go to a Ixjy 's camp too? 



Kappa Ep has had few members able 
to answer "Present" at roll calls. Abbott, 
StefTanides, and Phinney have been at 
the infirmary while Jaworski and Runvik 
are athletically disabled. 



Stockbridge track will be headed by 
Harold Pearson, a veteran niiddli -dis- 
tance runner. He with his team-mates 
who have been practicing under Coach 
Derby will meet the Amherst and State 
freshmen in dual meets as well as taking 
part in the interclass meet. 



Delta Phi Alpha has elected the follow- 
ing officers for the remainder of the year: 
president, S. Shepard '33; vice-president, 
E. Guralnick '.i.?, secretary. B. Wein- 
l)erger '34; treasurer, H. Bernstein '34. 



George "Red" Emery '24 was the guest 
speaker at the first formal dinner in the 
new Sig Ep dining hall. 



Walt Madinn is back from New- 
Orleans where he represented the Senate 
at the National Student Federation of 
.•\nierica. He stems to have h.id a very 
enjoyable .ime and has many interesting 
tales. Drop around and listen to Theta 
Chi's sage. 



DEB.\TERS UNDERTAKE 

DIFFICULT SCHEDULE 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

broadcast over WC.M'. In the evening, 
C.C.N.Y., which was defeated last year 
will be met in New York. The debates 
will all be on the subject: Resolved. 
"War Debts Shouhl Be Cancelled." The 
team will uphold both sides of the argu- 
ment in the meets. 

Having co-ed debaters is an inovation 
intrtxluced by Manager Hill '■"^'l. Three 
meetings will Ik- held: Pendiroke College 
at Brown University, F"ebruary 16; 
Boston University at Boston, February 
17; a tlebatc on campus with RaddifTe 
Ci)!lege that will enable the women to 
display their talent to their friends. 



BARNARD OPENS SERIES OF 

LITERATURE DISCUSSIONS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

Classic as an attempt to reach an nhjn- 
live estimate of the intrinsic value ot i 
work; the Romantic, an attempt to 
interpret a work impressionisticallv. it" 
Historical, the a|)proach to a work Iron 
the ix)int of view of the circumstance 
under which it was written; and the 
Naturalistic, the explanation of the 
(pialities of a w<jrk on a rational ba?i? 
He illustrated these methods from critical 
works and from the literatures of ma") 
languages. .Attaclcing each one, he >ho»i'. 
their fallacies and deficiencies. 

"The first principle of a soiin<l crii- 
cism," Mr. Barnard said, "is that it '^ 
the duty of the critic to interpret trutii 
to men." He must have definiu- con- 
victions concerning all things: hv niu^ 
accept certain things and reject other- 
su<h as naturalism and insinccriiv. . f 
Barnard asked the question. "How i? » « 
critic to know trmh? Criticisni> of l'|^ 
are opposed and it ap|H'ars that t er 
can be no real standards, sino criti>^ 
disagree. This is the fault of the criti 
and not life, for there are certain thm^- 
in the worhl which are eternal ht' '" 
changing." . ..j. 

In conclusion, Mr. Barnard -aici. ^^ 
is through entering mystically '"^.^^ ^^j, 
oneness of humanity that the ' "^ "v..^" 
gain assured knowledge of "^'" ' ^,„;, 
a consummation can Ix- achieved «'', 
through righteousness, 'a ngnf 
heart," or love which then l« ' ■ " 
final basis of all true criticism.' 



SPORTS 



-*• 



•*• 



State Bows to Brown 

Meets Bates and Colby 



MAROON SEXTET GOES 
TO UAISE COLLEGES 



The Mass. State College hockey sextet 
under the guidance of Coach Red Ball is 
anticipating a hard week-end. Friday 
night will find the Maroon and White 
engaging the sextet representing Bates 
College at Lewiston, Maine, while Satur- 
day at Waterville, Colby, Maine State 
champions will provide the opposition. 

The strength of the Bates sextet is 
relatively untried as yet, but indications 
point to a real battle when the State 
pucksters stack up against this team, 
Bates have five lettermen back from last 
year, and although the team lost a prac- 
tice game last week to a strong semi-pro 
team, Coach Morey has assembled a 
fighting group of pucksters who are given 
a good chance of annexing the Maine 
State championship. The lettermen in- 
clude Herb Berry, football star, and a 
strong defense man; Joe Murphy, Jr., 
former Huntington Prep star and a lead- 
ing Bates wingman; Flynn, veteran 
goalie; Hal Soba, defense man; and 
Ral()h McCluskey, veteran offense man. 
In addition. Coach Morey has several 
stars from the freshman team as well as 
men who have served their apprentice- 
ship under varsity men of the past two 
seasons. 

Coach Bill Millet's Colbyites annexed 
the Maine Slate championship last year, 
and lost only two men by graduation for 
the team this year. Colby, like Bates, 
has five lettermen back as well as a 
wealth of promising new material. The 
lettermen are: Captain Bill Wilson, 
center; Ulric Pomerlau, star wingman 
and spark|)lug of the team; Elbrielge 
Ross, right wing; Bob Violette, goalie; 
and Bill Hucke, defense. All of these 
men with the exceirtion of Pomerlau, 
who is out with a broken wrist, will 
prohably be in action Siiturday night 
against the State sextet in what promises 
to he an interesting battle. 

Coach Red Ball reports that all of his 
men are in gtxxl condition after the 
Brown game last Friday and are anxious 
to go. A comparison of the last two 
games which State played against these 
foes in 1931, resulted in a win for State 
over Bates and a loss for State against 
Colhy. Last season the Maroon and 
White did not play either Bates or Colby 
due to lack of ice. 



STATE FORCES BROWN 
TEAM INTO OVERTIME 



The Massachusetts State htKkey team 
journeyed down to Providence last Friday 
night in search of the hides of the Brown 
University Bears. Ahhough not com- 
pletely successful in their quest. Coach 
Red Ball's men managed to give the 
Bruins considerable of a scare. The final 
score after one overitme (x^riod had been 
found necessary to settle the issue read 
Brown 4 Mass. State 3. 

Brown opened the first period with a 
furious rush and succeeded in scoring 
two goals in the first minute and one- 
half of play on two long shots. Un- 
daunted the charges of Red Ball fought 
back with increasing vigor and al- 
though State eventually lost they out- 
played and outfought the Bruins during 
the last two periods and most of the 
overtime perioti. 

Mass. State scored its first goal at 
13.31 in the second |xriod on a sally of 
the Brown net by Cain, Snow and Henry 
in which Cain scored. Just l»efore the 
close of the second period George Cain 
once again poked the rubber i)ast the 
Brown goalie and tieil the score. Brown 
went ahead once again after alxtut seven 
minutes in the third period on a shot by 
the Brown center which caromed ofT the 
skate of Russ .Snow an<l into the Mass. 
.State net but State refused to stay be- 
hind. After IS minutes in the last period 
(Continued on Pufte 4, Column 4) 



Track Practise for 

Winter Season Started 



With the first meet more than two 
weeks away, the State varsity track team 
has Ijegun serious training for the differ- 
ent eve'nts. Only the ri-l;iy ti'am i-. 
entered in the first nie«-t, s[>on.sored by 
the Knights of Colundms and held in 
Boston, January 28. To make up the 
necessary quartet, Coach Derby has two 
vt>terans, Pruyne anri Crawford, and 
several new prospects from which to 
choose. 

More men are exjxcttMl to report this 
week as several lettermen of last year 
have not yet reported. In consideration 
of the men j)ractising at present for the 
different events, the team will probably 
be weak in the hurtlles and ptile vault 



SPORTS CALENDAR 



January II 

Ka'ikethall: (Marie here at K p.m. 

A.Sl'. v-8. KC.E.. 9:15 p.m.. B.isitctball 
\'olli-yl)all. 
January 13 

H.tskelhall: Middlebury here at 8 p.m. 
January 13 

HiH'ltey: Bates at Lewiston. 

K.S. vs. D.l'.A.. 7:30 p.m 
Volleyball. 

A.G.R. vs. P.S.K., 8:15 p.m 
Volleyball. 
January 14 

Hockey: Colby at Waterville. 
January 17 

L.C.A. vg. K.E., 8:30 p.m. 

S.P.K. vs. Q.T.V., 9:15 p.m. 



Basketball. 
Basketball. 



•«• 



Sbru tl7e Itnot Dole 



•¥ 




This columnist says: 

Yale is ttxi strong for Massachusetts 
.State . . . .State will double Clark's score 
Wednestlay night . . . and Ellert's hoop- 
sters will take Middlebury by 10 points. 



Nature in the raw — the State sopho- 
more-junior basketball game. 



A squat! of 3,3 has reported to Coach 
Larry Briggs as candidates for the fresh- 
men basketball team. The frosh will 
play New Salem Academy, Turners Falls 
High, Hopkins Academy, Agawam High 
and games are jx-nding with South 
Hadley Falls High and Deerfield High. 



Ernie Mitchell last year's varsity 
goalie is co.aching the frosh hockey team. 
Two of his iM'st prosfx^cts are the P»'ck- 
ham twins. Bob and Dick of Me«lfor<l. 
For the benefit of the freshmen co-eds 
Bob combs his hair on the side ami Dick 
in the middle. 



Did you know that an artist wanted 
Lou Bii-<h, the nation's h-.iding football 
scorer, to sit for a jMjrtrait at a gathering 
of the Amherst Women's Club? Lou de- 
dined courteously, saying that he wouhl 
not surrt-nder to "the sake of art." 



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Insures- Dryer, Cleaner, Cooler Smoke— $ 1.00 ONLY 



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NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



CUT FLOWERS 
and PLANTS 

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that do not fade or soil 

FOR YOUR FRIENDS OR HOME 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' I'rescriptions Killed. Broken lenses 

accuratily replaced 

BIG BEN ALAR.VI CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one BIftht) 



Walt Maclinn, number of the .Senate, 
who represented this college at the mert- 
ing of the .Asmm iai ion of Student Ctn-ern- 
ing Boartis in Colleges, tells a rather 
strange (to us at least) story of colhge 
slHifts. It s(ems that the (piestion of 
subsidizing athletes was discussed in the 
New Orleans convention. Mac re|K)rts 
th.it Orville Mohler, star Sf)uihern Cali- 
fornia tpiarterback said, in a rathtr 
serious tone, "I believe that a fxrson 
that plays football on a college varsity 
shouhl receive ONLY his board, room, 
tin'lion, and a little consi<leralion to 
bfKit." No wonder Southern California 
has great football teams! Jerry Dal- 
rymple, All-American enti at Tulane last 
year, an<l Bill Corbus, All-American guard 
at Stanford this year, attended the con- 
vention also. 



The fraternity basketball season will 
o[)en this week. Kappa Sigma, last year's 
champions, will be on hand to defend its 
title. 



IDA M. BRIDGEMAN 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst, Mass. 



1933 DESK CALENDARS 
and Refills 



DIARIES 

^I' IJENT ACCOUNT BOOKS 

WORLD ALMANAC 
leave your orders now 



CHILTON FOUNTAIN PENS 
Half Price 

WEBSTER'S 

COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY 

$3..50 formerly $5.00 



BOX LETTER FILES -50c 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



The Middlebury hockey game, sched- 
uled for yesterday, was called ofT because- 
of snow. 



The following men have reporte<l for 
frosh track: Anderson, Bishoj), Davidson, 
Harrows, Potter, Pro< tor, Wilrlner, H.it- 
tles, Dinio<h, Kerr, Dunker, Allen, 
Miner, Whitaker, I-Vank. The fresbriK-n 
will (ompete in the interclass nu-et, the 
interfraternity nuet, the Stockbrirlge 
freshmen meet, and the Amherst fro-.h 
meet . 



and only slightly stronger in the wt ight 
events. The relay team has Captain 
Pruyne and Crawford for lettermen an«l 
an excellent pros[«?ct in (iillette. Murray, 
one of State's I»cst cross-country men 
during the past reason antl a gooti relay 
team prosjM-'ct, has not yet reportcfl. 

The cHiiflidates who have reiK)rted: 
Cai)tain Pruyne, Crawford, MacMackin, 
Cairtl, Stephan, Jackson, Chase, Tarrett, 
Nislnt, Rogers, R. Allen, Shaw, Cam- 
ming, Jordan, Little, Trask, Dobijii-. 
tieorKC, .md Michelsfm. 



Yale Trounces State 
Clark and Middlebury Here 



VETERAN VERMONT FIVE 
HAS FAIR RECORD 



The loyal sup|X)rters of the Manmn 
and White will have their first op|)ort unity 
to see Coach Ellert's 1933 edition of the 
Massachusetts State College iKisketball 
team in action in Amherst when the 
State five meets Clark University on the 
Cage floor at 8 p.m. January 11. Last 
year the Maroon antl White hoopsters 
won six games and lost one on the Physi- 
cal Education building floor, a strong 
Providence College combine defeating 
State 3fi-21 in the final game of the 
season. Ellert's hoopsters had a very 
successful season in 1932, winning ten 
games and losing but four. 

The Clark contest will Iw the second 
game of the .scison for the M.issachusctts 
State quintet while Clark has played 
three games in its schedule. However, 
the Maroon and White five are confident 
of a win in the first home game because 
the Worcestcrites have not yet broken 
into the victory column. 

Clark University opened up its sched- 
ule in a contest with Northeastern Uni- 
versity, Clark going down to defeat, 
27-14. The Clark five played commend- 
able b.asketball in scrinunage but poor 
foul shooting ruined Cl.irk's chance for a 
victory, the Worcester team caging only 
five of twenty-two free tosses. In its 
seccmd game, Cl.irk was subdued by a 
hard-fighting Brown team, 31-22 in a 
.stublM)rn game. By its viitory Brown 
avenged the .lefcat which Cl.irk handetl 
to the Bears five in last year's game at 
Providence. Northeast«-rn gaine<l its 
second victory over (lark this season 
when it trounced the Wonester tpiintel 
in a dull game .3.^-21. 

The Clark University team h.is |)lenty 
of scoring |Miw»-r but in its first three 
games it has not shown a very tight 
branfl of thfensive pl.iy, its opponents 
piling up HH |Mjints to Clark's rt7. The 
outstanding player on the Clark combine 
is Brierly, regular center who has led his 
ieani in scoring in ivery <-ontesl. 

A strong MiddU-bury C.)llrge five will 
attempt to avenge last year's <lef< at at 
the hanels of St.ite when the Vermont 
hoopsters clash with the IVIarotm and 
White basketcers on the Massachusetts 
State College floor at H p.m., J.muary 12. 
In 1932, Little Lou Bush h-d Massachu- 
setts Stale to a 24-20 win over the Ver- 
monters, scoring ten fK)ints himself. 

Middlebury College has t>laye<l a 
rather extensiye schetlule so far this 
(Continued on Pafte 4. Column .S) 



BUSH AND NASSIF 

LEAD ELLERTMEN 

Outpl.iyed in every department of the 
game except courage, the Mar<H)n .md 
While basketcers of Massiu husetts State 
College were smotheretl under the intwer" 
till attack of a veteran Yale five at New 
Haven last night. .'■)2 17. The Ellertmen, 
playing their first game of the year, couhl 
not co|H- with the sniooth-finu tioning 
t)(Tense «>f the Blue team, and after the 
first few minutes Yale's exi)erience«l 
tpiintet seoreel |H>iiits pr.utically at will. 
Lou Hush led the .State .storing with four 
b.isket8 antl a foul but the feature of the 
game was the sens^itional defensive wt)rk 

• )f Eildie Nassif, sophom«>re guard, wht> 
playe.l Nikkei of Nale, l.ist year's leading 
storer in I he Eii.stern Intt rcollegiat.- 
Basketball Leagin-, for half of the game 
.md helel the Eli sl.u to one basket. 

The game ojiened slowly, with no 
seoriiig in the first few minutes. Then 
Nikk.l s;iiik a b.isket, Capl.iin O'Coniu-ll 
made giMwl a free try, and ^'.lk' led 3 (». 
On the next pl.iy. Captain Houran chalk.-d 
up the first |N>int for Slate in I!>;{.{ |,y 
seoring a foul shot. O'Coimell, Yale 
center, and Miles, Eli giiani sjink two 
baskets in succession to give- the- Blue- 
te.im a six point le.id. Lojko scored a 
dee try for Slate- .iiid then Frigard, starl- 
ing his lirsl v.irsity game, slip|K(l through 
the w.iry \'.ile delense- lo drop in a double 

• lee ker. Ucsse made kcmmI a free shot for 
^^lIe bill Lou Hush kept .Slate- in the 
nmiiiiig by seoring a b.iskit from the 
ce-nier of the- Hoot. A minute later, the- 
State st.ir again got away from Miles, 
N'ale- gii.irel, and score-el another twin- 
[Hiinler lo lie the- seetre. 

Up to this stage- of the n.iine | jie 
M.irooii aiiel White- lonibini- h.id fiiiie - 
tioiied siiioolliiy but .liter tying the- seoie- 
till- Si, lie defense- cnmibUel ami the- \nU- 
lorw.iril^ and eeiiti-r ran wild. Nikkei 
.md Sine r m ore el double ile-ckirs for Y.ile-. 
Hush of Stale and O'Coimell of \nU- sink 
Ire-e shots and ihe-ii Nikkt-I got away from 
Fiig.ird lo •,eore- two baskets. Re e->.e- ami 
O'Comiell ( h.ilkeel up double e|e < kt is aiiel 
just In-fore the half O'Conne-ll siiiik a free 
shot to give N'.ile- ,1 22 H lead. 

Yale- opened the- seeonel hall with a 
rush with Sjiner eluding Houran lo seore- 
three- sue e essive- baskets. .Milts, O'Con 
iiell anel Nikkei sank I win-|M)inlers lo 
further increase Yale's margin. Afie-r a 
brief lime-tiiil, Yale eonlinued its whirl- 
wind pace- with Nikkei, S;iner anel Re e-se- 
sioring baskets, l.oii Hush came- through 
(C>>ntlnued on Piite 2, Ckilumn 3) 



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WOOL ZM'I'KK COATS - Ncm f.i.ir, 
fORDI ROY TROI SI,RS - \f»w $2.4.') 



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THE MASSACIIUSEITS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1933 



BURBERRY OVERCOATS 

111 select ini; your overcoat for this season you do not have to choose between luxury and utility. There is 
one ovtMcoai (liat will j^ive you both, the Burberry. It will outwear any other overcoat you ever owned. 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



J. I'All, W II. MAMS TO 

ADDRKSS SUNDAY CIIAPKL 
(Continued from Pafte I) 

Befon- romini,' to M.S.C. lie Ii.kI Imcii 
aswH-iati- (lirtH-tor of the Wesley Foun- 
dation ill I'rljana, 111., and assistant in 
stiKknt work at kiversidi- Chunh, New 
York. 

During tliis time lie leccised his H.I), 
denrcc from (iainlt Hildical Institute in 
l'.)27, and his M.A. degree from Columbia 
IJiliveisity in 1028, at whii h time he 
eame to this (-olle^;*-. lie is a member of 
Ka|>|)a Sixiiia, Phi Ka|)|)a Delta, Fellow 
of the National Council on Kelinion. 



TRUSFEKS CONSIDER RAISE 

IN com.i:c;e iuition 

(Continued from Pait* ■) 

the Boiird of Trustees. 

This coniniission was created by the 
legislature to study the fiscal problem of 
the state in prcimration for the budjjet 
of 19;{:{. Because of the decreased 
revenues from taxation for the support 
of the school, the commission recom- 
mended that the students should be 
made to pay a larger part of the ex[)ense 
of the college. The increase of tuition is 
expected to add $2.'),00() in ly.'JS and 
$50,000 each year thereafter to the in- 
come of the slate, 

As part of the plan to reduce the ex- 
penditures of the state the tuition of the 



.Massachusetts Nautical, Art, and Tex- 
tile schools is also ex|x.'cted to be in- 
creased. 

DR. BARBOUR ADDRESSES 

SUNDAY CHAPEL ASSEMBLY 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

sensations and asked why, in these da> s 
when great music is available, one should 
choose to live in the cellar. Discussing 
the attitude to take toward alleged new 
truth, he explained two etiually bad ones: 
to reject it merely because it is new; to 
accept it merely because it is new. On 
the other hand, there is only one right 
attitude to follow the alleged truth to 
see whether it is true. This attitudi' 
means going out between the parallels to 
find out. 

In conclusion, Dr. Barbour reminded 
his audience that everyone eventually 
(onus to the Pacific shore from which he 
Mts out on another stage of the journey, 
another voyage of discovery. Over 
Nonder there are undoiibteflly opiK)r- 
t unities for iliscoveries which cannot \h; 
made here. S])eaking of Mr. Co<jlidge's 
journey into the unknown. Dr. BarlK)ur 
wondered what his inquiring mind had 
already found there and observed that 
he who lives learning and dies learning, 
doubtless goes on learning and Ix-lieves — 
"I only know I cannot drift beyond His 
love and care." 



SKI TOGS AND 

SKATING TOGS for 

STATE COLLEGE 

MEN and WOMEN! 

COLODNY 

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CO. 

32 MAIN ST. 

(Xear Depot) 

NORTHAMPTON, 
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and Riding Habits. 

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of S5.00 » r over 



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Velveteen 
Corduroy 
Terrycloth 
Rayon 
Crepe 

Broadcloth 

$1.00 to $4.50 



REPORT SHOWS STATUS 

OF COLLEGE FINANCES 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

time appropriations have grown only 101 
To meet this situation the College has 
lor two years limite<l the enrollment of 
new stu<!eiUs and substantially increased 
the teaching load of individual instruc- 
tors. Summer School was omitted in 
iy.'i2 and will be again in l!>;j:{ and drastic 
economy has been practiced in all 
ojHrating expenditures. 

There is urgent iieetl for additional 
dormitory accommodations at the Col- 
lege. The growth in student enrollment 
has overrun the limited housing facilities 
of the town and students are compelled 
to live long distances from the campus 
and frequently under unsatisfactory con- 
ditions of social and sanitary environ- 
ment. Since dormitories can be self- 
sup|M)rting and .self-liquidating finan- 
cially, the Trustees have felt that the 
State might well take advantage of 
present low co.sts, to construct a men's 
and a women's dormitcjry on the campus. 
They have, therefore, introduced a bill 
for the consideration of the Legislature 
which proix)ses such construction this 
year. 

The effect of the economic situation 
upon our students has Inen serious. 
Some have had to withdraw from college 
and many others are maintaining them- 
selves here by the barest existence. The 
College is doing all that it can to help 
such students. It granted sixty tuition 
scholarships out of the income of its 
trust funds, made loans to 122 students 
and provided jiart time employment to 
403 others. In spite of this help which 
the College has been able to give, its 
facilities have not bten adequate to 
fully meet the needs of worthy stu<lents. 



STATE FORCES BROWN 

TE:AM INTO OVERTIME 
(Continued from Pa|le 3) 

Pop Henry shoved a rebound ofl the 
Brown goalie's pads into the net to lie 
the score and force an overtime (Kriod. 

It didn't take Brov.n long however to 
once more forge into the lead for just 
21 seconds after the start of overtime 
play Peiin Hargrove broke lof)se on a 
long solo dash to score what proved to Ix- 
ihe winning (xjint. This last score proved 
a bit too miich for the Maroon and White 
to overcome and although they fought 
to the last they couUI not even up the 
score. 

The line-up: 

Brown Mass. State 

t liase, Iw Iw, Henry 

I.<«R. c f . -^now 

HarRrove. rw nv, Cochran 

Tracy, 1(1 Id. A. Urown 

(lenient, rrt rU. Hamin<)nil 

I'rokluiiu, K K. McGuckiau 

Score: Urown 1, Mass. State 3. 

First iierlod: 1, Urown, Lcrk. .1**; 2, Brown, 
l-egg (Chase), 1.32. 

Second i)eriod: -i. Mass. State, Cain (Henry, 
Snow). 13.31; 4. Mass. State. Cain, 19,40. Penal- 
ties: Johnson, Snow. 

Third period: '>. Brown, l.eKi{, 7.51; 6, Mass. 
State. Henry, IK.OO. I'enalties, Chase, Nolan, 
A. Brown, Blackburn. 

Overtime: 7, Brown, Hargrove. .21. 

Brown spares: Nolan, Johnson, Hart, Slock- 
bridge. Hall, ilenshaw. 

Mass. State spares: \V. C. Brown, Cain, R. 
Blackburn. 



BUSH AND NASSIF 

LEAD ELLERTMIN 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

for State with a basket and then the ^ iK- 
seconds entered the game with the scire 
40- 1:5, Vale leading. 

Click and Elliot sank (wo doi M, 
deckers apiece for Yale ami Kennedy ,iri(| 
Dickson completed the Eli scoiing w i!i 
two more b.iskets. The Maroon .iml 
White tiuintet was still ver> much in the 
game, liowexcr, and Lojko, Bush mi] 
Sievers dropped in t win-|>ointers ior iln 
Ellertmen Ix-fore the game ended. 



Yale 








Maes. State 






B. 


F. 


p. 




B. 


1- !■ 


.Saner, rf 


;> 





10 


Bush.rf 


4 


1 1 


Kennedy.rf 


1 


() 


2 


Hanson, rf 





U 1 


Uickson.rf 


1 





2 


Lojko,l( 


1 


1 :t 


.Nikk.-l.lf 


6 





12 


Fawcett ,c 





(1 1 


KelloKK.lf 











Sievers,c 


1 


" L 


l,arsen,lf 





n 





Zielinski.c 





II 1 


O'Connell.c 


3 


3 


» 


Friuard.rg 


1 


II 


KUiot.c 


2 





4 


Nassif.rg 





II 1 


Kecse.rK 


2 


1 


5 


Houran.lK 







(ilick.rK 


2 





4 


Ahlslroni,lg 





U 1 


Watson. rg 











Javorski.lg 





11 1 


.Miles.le 


2 





4 








Bender, Ig 



















24 


4 52 




7 


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Prices Reasonable No ("«>\cr Charge We Satisfy 



Nassif, Davis, and Genest 
Lead Sophs to Win 

After three successive days of compe- 
tition, the Massachusetts State sopho- 
more finally emerged the winners of the 
iiiterdass b.isketball title when they 
ttounicd the seniors in a one-r.ide<l game 
in the physi<al educ.uion building on 
J.iiui.iry ('(, 27-i:i. In the lirsi round of 
play the State soplu)mores defeate<l the 
Si .lit- juniors in a liard-foiighl game. .\1m) 
in the lirst round the Sl.iie seniors de- 
fe:'.ted the State freshmen ami the Siock- 
bridge fnshmen deflated the Stockbridge 
etiiors. On J.uiu.try .">, the S'ale -i niurs 
di fealed ihe Stoc khtidge fresh nun, :i7-25, 
to » nur the final round. 

In the ih.im; ionship v;iiiie, t lu- S;,iii 



sophomores jumped into an early lead 
over the State seniors and were never 
headed. At the half the sophomores were 
leading LWi with Nassif, Genest, and 
Davis bearing the brunt of the attack. 
Although the sophomore second team 
played the greater part of the second 
half, the seniors could not function 
stmKxhly and the contest ended 27-l.'i in 
favor of the class of '35. Pruyne was the 
leatling scorer for the seniors with two 
baskets and five fouls. The score: 



Sophomores 






Senior 


rs 






B. 


K. 


p. 




B. 


h. 


P, 


.\assif.lf 1 


1 


3 


Minarik.rg 


1 





*> 


( onsolatti.lf 2 





4 


Gallup.lg 











U' Urien.lf 1 





2 


I lager c 


1 





•> 


C^nest.rf 3 





6 


Pruyne. rf 


2 


5 


5 


MuUer.rf 1 





2 


White.lf 











McCleary,rf 
















Harris.rf 
















Davis,c 3 





tj 










Muller.c 
















l-eary c 
















McKellisott,lR 1 





2 










Landis.lg 





() 










laworski.rg 1 















Mc( Icary.rs 
















.MuIler,rK 

















13 1 27 



.5 13 



VETERAN VERMONT FIVE 

HAS FAIR RECORD 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

season, defeating Ithaca in the opening 
game and then meeting in succession. I 
Upsiila, Rutgers, and Rider Collect | 
Middlebury gained victories over Upsah, 
fell before Rider and the Vermont quintti 
was trounced by Rutgers, 5()-30. In the 
Rutgers game, Middlebury's defense a- 
gainst the Rutgers forward line was viry 
weak, the forwards of the New Jersty 
team amassing thirty jjoints. Corliss at 
left guard antl Chalmers at left forward, 
led the Vernionters attack against Rut- 
gers, each player scorer making (out| 
baskets. The bright s|X)t of the Middit- 
bury quintet this seas^)n has been the I 
sparkling work of Captain Corliss, Ixith 
ofTensively and defensively. 

Coat h Ellert will send his stronj;(st I 
comtiination u(x>n the floor against the 
Middlebury five for he realizes that tht 
Maroon and White team, having played 
\'ale and Clark on the two preceding | 
nights will not be at the [xak of its yanie 
ami that his basketball team will hiv*| 
to be at full strength to turn Ixiik ih' 
strong Middlebury threat. 



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Ricii.\Ki) nix 
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Friday, Jan. 13 

II. (,. Well.' Thrillin.- Novel 

''ISLE OF LOST SOULS" 

.with 

Charles I.aughton — Hela l.ucosi 

Richard ."Vrien — I.eila Hyanis 

and the 

"PANTHER WOMAN" 

Sa turday, Jan. 14 — 2 Featu res 

CAKOI.K LOMHARD— in 
"NO MORE ORCHIDS" 

. Co-Feature • 

Wni. Collier Ir. — loan Marsh— in 

"SPEED DEMON" 

Mon.-Tues.. Jan. 16-17 

Krnest Hemingway's 

"FAREWELL TO ARMS" 

with (.ARY COOPKR 
Helen H.^VES— Adolphe MENJOf 



COLONIAL INN 

(.OOD FOOD — REDL'CKD RATES 
WKKKLV BOARD Sfi.oo 

M.S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

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AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 

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v. A. C. Library. 



A CURRENT EVENT IN 
THE COLLEGIAN 

Read "College Men in Slntf H^ 

SInft." « kurrey of the A 

morality of collefte gradu- ^jj 

a tee In today's Agora Hg^ 

column. ^i 



/ftassacbugi 







OUT8TANOING EVENT 
OP THE WEEK 



'I'he Wonien'n Little Sym- ^^ 
|ih«>iiy Orchrmlru of lluslon'a 

(ilaylnit ul .Sunday's StHial 
iiiiin (^incrrl In the must 
iiifiiioralile event of the 
past week. 



t 

t 



Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1933 



Number 12 



Women's Little Symphony 
in Social Union Program 



Music of the Romantic School 
Dominates Program 



leatnrinn compo >itions of Schulx-rt, 
Hi/it, Sihtlius and other iomi)o.sers of 
tht Romantic School, the WouR-n's Little 
Symijhony of Boston presented a pro- 
^!.vi\ itf senii-classical music in Bowkir 
.\iiilitorium last Sunday. The orchestra 
tt I., under the direction of Nicolas 
Sliiiiinisky. 

A-i nuinlx'rs of the Boston Symphony 
Orihcstra, the sixteen women comprising 
the Women's Little Symphony are tal- 
, nted and acconi[)iished musicians. Their 
(liridor, Nicolas SUniimsky, has been 
connected with the Boston Symphony 
since 1925 and has written many musical 
(Oin|«sitions. One of his com ix»sit ions 
entitled "Aromas de Leyenda" was to be 
[il.iyed as a violin solo by Miss Relx-cca 
Dnlfcr, Owing to unavoidable circum- 
stances Miss Dulfer was unable to apjx-ar 
ami the piece was not played. 

.As a feature of the program, Miss 
Shaw played a violin solo entitled 'Tan- 
tansia on Gounod's Faust" by de Sara- 
(Contlnued on Page 4, Column 4) 



PROF, WAUGH WRITES 
ON FAMOUS SHRINE 



Describes MeijI Shrine in Springfield 
Paper 

Satisfying the heart more than the 
churches of America and the cathedrals 
of Europe, the Meiji Shrine in Tokio is 
the most religious spot in the world, 
according to Professor Frank Waugh in 
an article in the Springfield Republican 
and Union for January 15. 

Explaining this statement, Professor 
Waugh wrote: "By this I mean it more 
completely satisfies the mind and heart. 
It has a more palpable religious atmos- 
phere. . . More than any other work of 
ecclesiastical architecture it floods the 
consciousness with rich emotions of 
solemnity and peace and lifts the heart 
in prayer." 

To the Meiji Shrine come pilgrims 
from all Japan and so potent is the spirit 
of the buildings that each visitor regard- 
less of creed bends his head in prayer. 
Entire schools led by their teachers come 
to s()end the day in devotion to Japan's 
gfxls. There are no priests, no liturgy, 
no service at this shrine only silent pil- 
grims. On special occasions the Meiji 
Shrine is visited by crowds of eighty 
thousand to a hundred thousand people. 

Professor Waugh was so impressed by 
the Shrine that he doubts if Christianity 
is any better than the so called paganism 
of these people. "I have no doubt but 
that Christian Religion has had a great 
an<l beneficial influence in Japan . . . but 
tnianwhiie it would seem wholly fitting 
■or the Japanese to send their mission- 
ariis to America to build a few sanctu- 
ario like the Meiji Shrine to the glory of 
the universal God." 



Dr. Hugh Black to be 

Next Chapel Speaker 

I^r. Hugh Black, professor of practical 
th'ology at the Union Theology Seminary 
*ill lie the chapel speaker on Sunday, 
January 22. Dr. Black was born in 
"^"'land in 1868, attended the Scottish 
^' hoolrs and was graduated from Rothesay 
^' il< rny, Glasgow University, and the 
''^" Church College. After coming to 
'Hn ountry, he received his D.D. degree 
'^"•' Yale University in 1908, from 
Pnr, rton University and from Glasgow 
>-niv,rsity in 1911. His studies culmin- 
•"<'i m the receipt of the degree of D.Litt. 
'^"1" the University of Pittsburgh in 
"'• Since 190fj, he has been professor 
"f practical theology at Union Theologi- 
'"I'l S ininary in New York City. He is 

' author of several books among them 

ri, n.lship," "The Open Door," and 

' ' • W. Forget." 




WALTER MACLINN 
M.S.C. Reprokentathe at Tulane 



MACLINN ATTENDS 
N.S.F.A. CONVENTION 

Honor System, Athletics, Publica- 
tions in Discussion 

"That Massachusetts State College 
ranks very high among the colleges of 
the United States in the matter of con- 
structive s(u<lent govtrnmenf" is what 
made the greatest impression uix)n Walter 
MacLinn "S.i as a result of his recent trip 
to the convention of the National Stu- 
dent Feiieration of .America held this 
year at New Orleans, La. This organiza- 
tion is the fKirent Inxly of the Student 
Government Ixxlies of ieaeling colleges in 
the country, and Mr. MacLinn made the 
trip as a representative of the Massa- 
chusetts State College Senate. 

The convention was held this year at 
Tulane University from December 28 to 
January 1 and was attended by delegates 
from all the leading colleges in the 
country. An illustration of the high 
character and serious intentions of this 
convention can be gathered from the 
nature of the topics which came up for 
discussion, such as honor systems, stud- 
ent governments in small colleges and the 
elimination of fraternity politics, the 
problem of governing school publications 
with the view to maintaining a high 
standard, athletics, state and tax sup- 
ported schools, and compulsory military 
training in land grant colleges. 

From the discussions which took place, 
Mr. MacLinn stated it was very apr>arent 
that very many institutions do not pro- 
vide their students with the privileges 
and advantages which we have here at 
Mass. State, nor are the student bodies 
(Continued on Page 4, Coiumn 5) 



REV. J. PAUL WILLIAMS 
SUN. CHAPEL SPEAKER 



"Pull Yourself Together" Subject of 
Address 



That one must maintain a clear-cut 
purpose, a sense of humor, and the power 
of prayer, if he would achieve integration, 
was stressed by Rev. J. Paul Williams in 
his chajiel address last Sunday morning. 
A vocal sfjio by Mr. Rol)ert Quirk, prin- 
cipal of the Amherst Junior High School, 
preceded Mr. Williams' address. 

Mr. Williams <Ies<:rilKd a boy of twelve 
who, culminating a series of remarkable 
feats, was such a genius that he lectured 
on the fourth dimension to a Harvard 
mathematics class. Since then he has 
amounted to nothing, Ix-causc he had 
nothing to accomplish. H«- had a great 
gun, but nothing to shoot at. In other 
words, his liie was disinte.;rate<l. 

Harry Emer on Fosdick recently pub- 
lishe<l a sermon "Pull Yourself Together" 
and from that title Mr. Williams con- 
ceived the sermon whie h he delivered 
Sunday. The force l>ehin.l the title aims 
at every one of us, from the fxrtential 
genius dovm to the least endowed. Sir 
Eelwin Arnold, preaching to stuelents at 
Harvard, said, "In 177r. you coneiuered 
your fathers, in 18^.5 your brothers; 
your next victory must be over your- 
selves." 

(ConHnued on Pa4e 4. Column 5) 



221 Students on 

Fall Honor List 

Two IJpperclassmen Only in *)0-100 
(jroup 

Only the clasM-s of IK.W .md IH.M .ire 
rcpKMiiieil in the lir^t luim>r .Uvrage of 
W-m), the Dean's S li(.l.,rship gre.up 
shows for tlu' f.ill term. .A total ol 221 
stu<ients in.ide the hejuor roll, wliiih 
e-oniprises about ^.VJ of the student IwHly. 
Fifty-six |HTcent of the ^etiior class anel 
20i of the junior class have average> 
within the honor groups. The li>l follows: 
(;r()| I' I 

Cla.ts of new— B. Ugur, (;. K. .'^t.-rtanides, J, C. 
Swnrt/wcldiT. 

y\;\n.i of l<mi— Miss E. e'ook, II. .'^. Driimark, 
W. iC<>2loNvski. 

GROfl' II 

t laM of 1933- Mlsii M. 1.. An.l.rsoii. Mias I. K" 
AriiistroiiK, U. A!«iiiith, J. H. Il.irr, J. (". Harter. 

A. K. H«Mrs«', MiHs K. !•!. licriiiaii. Miss 1). <1. 
Best, Miss M. M. Boston. II. W. Clirnowt'th, 

B. e . e;o<><lrll, a. B. lluni.y, R. Hanson. R. S. 
llosliird. Miss K. Klaiitkc, 1'. J. Le'vcrraiilt. J. L. 
Marcliflewicz. Miss C. W. Miller. Miss J. Mun.son, 
J. G. () Mara. A. C. Farkcr, R. K. IVliswiir, J, 
I'olitella, A. A. Riiniaki, 1'. L. Sisson. W. T. 
Smith, L. Suutliwick, K. J. Thoin|>sou, W. S. 
I tiry , W. R. Ward. 

Class of Itt34-Mis8 L. K. A.latns, C. K. Ains- 
worth, ei. A. iimirceois, 3i(l, I). \V. Caird, Miss 
R. O, {'ampMI, K. M. Col.-, R. T. foleman, 
T. K. Cooke Jr., (". K. C'oonibs, R. T. Cowinri. 

C. L. Krenih, \V'. Krinard. Miss K. A. llaK<'r, 
Miss I'. L. IlililM-rK, A. A. Ilotlnian. Miss 11. M. 
Jai kson, J. Ixijku, Miss K. J. M.ii Donald, A. C. 
Merrill Jr., Miss R. S. Redman, Miss N. K. Russell, 

A. S. Ryan, K. K. Steffek. Miss K. P. Stoeber. 
Mi)W M. I. Taylor, II. A. Walker, Mis,s K, Wheeler. 
N. A. Wheeler, J. A. Whitney. 

Class of l<t.t.> R. W. Al.tiott. W. H. Boynton, 
J. C. Kldricl»{e, Miss M. K. KinKston, A. E. New- 
ton, W. A. S-olt, W. Stepat. 

Class of 1<»36— A. H. Briierkner, Miss Billiard, 
W. W. Chilson, R. C. l)«-»niond. A. II. Kisher, 
Miss llaKer, J. V. T. Keiniilun, .Miss Ixjw. 

GROUP III 

< la.ss of 1<)3.3— (;. E. Aldrith. Miss D. B. 
Benjamin, B. I). Belts. R H. Biikfoid, J. C. 
Biilman, Miss Vi. E. (."ary, I). Crosliy, J. B. 
( rowell, J. M. Dethter. C. C. Entwisllc. J. M. 
Kowler, Miss A. E. Garity, S. R. <;ilmore, Misa 
1. R. CWnsburK, C. T. t.leason, Mi»» K. treason, 
R. C. Hammond, A. K. Hovey, R. M. Howes, 
Miss C. N. Huhhard, Miss K. M. Kane, h.. R. 
Karlson. W. M. KuliUx k. K. C. Miner, E. Nash. 
H. R. Nelson. Miss A. L. Ordway, J. Polar. T. H. 
Powell, A. G. Priest, S. B. Stott. W. M. Semanic, 
J. J. Sheff. S. Sttepard. R. Taft, F. H. Taylor. 
S. W. Tyler, Mitt S B. Wilson. 

ClaM of 19:t4— H. R. Alton, R. G. Bates. 
H. Bernstein, U. L. Birk. <;. T. Bowler. S. Brcs- 
nick, L. J. Bush, Miss E. S. Cande, N. S. ( hapin 
E. G. (lark. Mi»» M. L. Clark, R. D. Coldwell. 
R. K. Cole, Miss F. L. Cook. Miss F. (J. < osta, 
R. W. Dexter. Miss C. M. Ellis. J. B. Farrar, 
Miss B. K. Cemtd. N. B. Hill. A. R. Hodgen. 
C. Hurwitz. H. Jenkins, E. Landsman, W. S. 
Lister Jr., MissS. E. Mc< arthy, A. T. McGuckian, 
N. P. Nichols, C. F. O'Neil. Miss S. A. I'easlee. 
J. F. Pozzi, H. Pyenson. J. W. Rot>ert»on Jr., 
Miss L. E. Rowland, A. Sherman, Mi.ss A. E. 
Skipton. D. H. Smith, Miss E. Smith, W. H. 
Southworth, R. Sturtevant. Miss G. E. Tiffany, 

B. Weinl>e.-Ber. E. R. Wyman. J. F. Zielinski. 
Class of 19.'J5 — G. M. Biune. Miss M. E. Currier. 

G. B. Dennis. H. D. Epstein. Mise C. L. Frey. 
E. H. Genest. Miss E. A. Gunn, G. A. Hartwetl. 
R. H. Ilermanson, R. W. Hubbard, A. S. Irvine. 
R. F. Libbey. S. Little J... Mlw E. Lorinx, J. J. 
Moulton, Miss M. A. Murphy, E. L. Packard, 
L. Pollin. P. Robinton, G. F. Shaw. Miss M. E. 
Smith. J. J. Valentine, J. P. Veerllng. 

Class of 1936— A. C. Battles, A. F. Bixby. 
Miss M. A. Cawley. Miss M. Ihase. J. W. Clapp. 
P. J. Driscoll, P. J. Fitzgerald, J. E. Franco. 
IS. Gottcsman. MissC. H Hall, MiseL. Horrigan. 
Miss Hutchinson, E. V. I^w, Miss LeDuc, R. M. 
Logan. T. H. Lord. C. L. Lothrop, Miss Macin- 
tosh. Miss Malmquist. C. W. Marsh. S. Neuman. 
Miss Nurml. H. D. Pratt, A. P. Richards, Miss 
E. Riley, C. L. SanClemente, A. S. Shulkiu. C. N. 
Sjogren. Miss F. Smith. J. W. Stewart. A. J. 
Stuart, H. S. Tubiash, Miss L. L'rban, G. A. 
Vassos Jr., W. Wainio. Miss Whitney. 

PRESIDENT BAKER TO ATTEND 

TRUSTEES' MEETING 

President Hugh P. Fiaker will attenel 
the annual meeting of the lk)ard of 
Trustees in lioston on Friday, January 19. 
At that time, Presielent Baker will stuely 
many of the preiblems of the eollege with 
which he will deal after Feljruary 1. He 
will also take part in the diseussiwis eon- 
eerning such vital issues as the int rea^c 
in tuition and the limitation of enrollment 
in Se-ptemUr. During the meeting Dean 
Machnier, .Secretary llawley. Treasurer 
Kenney, and the heads of the Experiment 
Station and Extension Service will give 
their annual refxirts. 



CAMPII.S CALF.NOAR 



Silence'. Ok, well are Death and Slrrp and Thou 
Three hrelhrtn named, tht guardians nl'iomy- 

Ti-inged, 
Of one abyss, vhere Itf' and truth and ]»y 
Are swaWrwed up. 

—.Shelley — Fragmenti, .Silence 

Wedneaday. January 18 

«(X)p.m. \'arsity Basketball, Williams 
Thursday. January i» 

8.00 p.m. SprinKtw Id Community < omcrt. 
Allx-rt S[)alding, violini-st 
Saturday, January 2t ^ „ ,. . . 

8.00 p.m. \arsity Haskelt)all. Connecticut 

Sunday, January 22 „ ^ oi b 

9 00 a.m. Chai>el. Professor Hugh Black 

2.'J0pm. Christian Association, .Memorial 
Hall 
Monday. January 23 

K.OO p.m. e,lrs' ( lub. Memorial Hall 
Tuesday. January 24 

6 4.5 p m. Uinuuatrc and Literature Talk, 
Stockbridge ,, , 

S (JO p.m. ( ampus Chorus, Memorial Hall 

K.OO p.m. Orchestra Rehearsal 



Troy Talks on Christian 
Platonism in Discussions 



SHOWS ITS INFLUENt:E IN 

SPENCERS FAIRIE gUEENE 

That Platonism foreshade>wed Christ i- 
.tiiity, later iiu r^;ed with it, and was re- 
Ixnii ill the Ken.ii^sani e e^petialh in the 
IHH'lry of Eelmunei Sjieneer was the idea 




MR. FREDERICK TROY 



NEW MEMBERS ELECTED 
TO COLLEGIAN BOARD 



inilMtelicd in "Christian Platonism and t he 
I'airie niuiiie," a talk ni\«n liy Mr. 
Frediriik Troy ol tin- deparlimnt of 
laiglish last evening. This was the se-conel 
ol ,1 series of dise usmohn by the iminlH-rs 
of the- (li|i.iiliiient of l.mgiiaur aiiei 
lilei.it iif r.K h Tiieselay evening at 
tl.4.'> p.m. ill Slot kill id^e Hall. 

Mr. Tiny ,s.iiil ill. It PI,iioiiir,iu was erne 
nl the gnale'st philosophies I'uiit'eiveel by 
111. in, htre.sseil the- mniepts e»f biauty, 
UiMidiiis^, and truth as I he attributes e»f 
i'.ixl. riie teachings eif Jesus which 
I'lilu's iheiiinht foresh.idoMed sliowetl 
(.od also as a rrinil>. To Pl.Ko, man 
|K)sse.s.sed a ehi.il nature, the tw<j elements 
of whi( h were the finite and the infinite. 
.\ prolilein which the philosopher could 
not .sol\e r.ition.illy and which troubled 
lliidclh.t w.is to line! or know "the dynamic 
Imjiic! Utweeii the- (inile and (he infinite." 
liiidclh.i laiiKht repuili.it ion of sell, diH- 
lonleiit with the finite and life in the 
infinite. Ji-mis, who w.is JMith man and 
<><mI, laiiKht that man was one with the 
Father, and in the |H-rsonality of Jesus 
the "dynamic lioiid" was found, love. 

During the Middle Ages, PlaltMiism as 
a basis for Christianity gave way to the 
le-achings of Aristotle and was ec li|>sed 
for He viral centuries. With the Renais- 
sance and the rebirth of science and art, 
Platonism returned, and found expression 
in the great |)oetry and art of the age. 
(Continued on Pafte 3. Column 3) 



Parsons and Shaw Chosen from 
Twenty (>andidate8 



Edith M. Parsons '."JO and Glenn F 
Shaw 'lid have Ijcen eh-cted to the edi- 
torial lioard of the Massachusetts Collrgiitn 
according to an announcement by the 
editors of the weekly. Miss Parsons will 
se-rve in the news deiNirtment, while Mr. 
Shaw will Ik- engaged in s|M)rts re|Mirting. 

Both candidates were elected from a 
group of twenty students who entered 
in the competition during the nine weeks 
of the fall term. The comijetition con- 
sisted of weekly assignments. Quality 
of work, and ability to write and to 
discover news, were the standards on 
which the election was based. 

During the winter term, another com- 
(letition will Ik- held which is o|)en to all 
stuelents including (hose who com|K't4*d 
during the fall term. The ColUf^ian as an 
activity presents an exeellcnt opportunity 
for students tc» write and to l)ccome ac- 
quainted with the college activities. 

DR. CHARLES^WALKER 
DIES IN CONNECTICUT 

Professor of Political .Science from 
IKR6 to 1906 



PROCTOR RECEIVES 

HOOD SCHOLARSHIP 



Bickford, Potter, Andrews, Other 
Recipients 



Dr. Charles S. Walker, professor of 
[Kjlitical science at the College from IKWi 
to 1906 and chaplain of the College dur- 
ing that time, died in Darien, Conn. 
Ia.st Saturday at the age of eighty-six. 
Dr. Walker who was the only man to 
receive a dtxlorate of philosophy frejrn 
Anihe-rst Ce>llege came to this College in 
imi. Between ISKC, and 190(5, while 
teaching at the College, he held several 
ministries in and alniut Amherst anel at 
one time was acting jiresident of the 
College. The Lter years of his life after 
leaving the College he flevejteel to writing 
and lec-turing. His two Mmn, Claude and 
Charles Walker, are iKJth graduates of 
the Cfjilege. 

During his professejrshij), ln' hcl()ed 
one c<f tlie present memlje rs of the 
Supreme Court of the I'nited States, 
Justice Harlan Stone wlio was stiirlying 
agriculture at M.A.C. Through the in- 
fluence of his professor, Harlan Stone 
transferrecl himse-lf tcj Arnlu-rst (College 
and cngageel in the ttudy of (K)litical 
science. It was this move that turned 
him to law as a profession anel later to 
accept the- ap(»ointment cif as.soei.it e 
justice cjf the- Siirjieine- ("oiirt. 



Raymond Norris Proitor of the class 
of 19.'ir» has In-cn awarded the Hooel 
Scholarship of $200 according to an 
announcement by .Secretary llawley. 
This is one of the four scholarships 
awarded to one me-mlM-r of each of the 
four classes by Dr. Charles H. Hexxl of 
the H. P. Hcjod & .Sons Dairy Coni|)any. 

These scholarships are awarded to 
those men and women students "whose 
aim is to defmitely promote farming as 
a life op|>ort unity, particularly in the 
produeiion of milk." The meml^ers of 
the three up|)er clas.se8 who received the 
scholarshi|>s in Octolx-r are Ralph Bick- 
ford '.'{.}, Harold Potter '.'M, and Frederick 
Andrews ",i('>. 

Secretary llawley. Dean Machmer, and 
Treasurer Kenney comprised the com- 
mittee which awarded the scholarships. 



Mass. Collision Makes 
Appearance on Campus 

Entitle-d the Massac husrtts Collision, a 
weekly newspa|M-r has ap|x-ared on cam- 
pus, whose- editorial |>olicy is to "make 
the- Colltsion a pafie-r, the understanding 
of whic h is within the grasp of the deaf, 
the blind, or anyone who may have a 
few niiniite-s, the wasting of which will 
not we-igh too heavil> on his consc ienre." 
The Cdlltsion is edited by Burns Robbing 
'.'{4, Costas (!aragianis '.'*.'{, l^-njamin 
Be tts 'X\, anel Philip Anelerson '.m. 

Tfie outstanding article of the- |)a|K-r is 
a parexly on the rushing anel pledging of 
the fejur sororities, which, in the Colltsion, 
assume- the- forms of a .Minerva, a Venus, 
a Diana, and a Ceres. An exceedingly 
lengthy article is wiitten em the alxtlish- 
nic-ni of morning cha|Kl, in which the 
eclitcjrs frankly apfirove of the action. 
Cont.iine-d in the- arti< le- (with notes) is a 
"liK id discussion of the next Sunday's 
sfieake r." 

The e-diiorials list, for the lienefit of 
jxrplexe-d readers, the jMilicy and duty 
(if the Massiichusetts Colliston. "...the 
staff hhall piibli'-h only the- unbiased, un- 
prejudice'l, and im|>artial cle-c ihions reach- 
ed after a scanty, hasty, and daz«-d con- 
fide raticjii of the facts, if any, of one side 
of the question only." The publication 
is intended for weekly issuance. 



> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1933 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1933 



/Bbaesacbiiee 




(ToUcQian 



Official newspapei of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



BOARD or EDITORS 

JOSEIU POLITKLLA 

Editcr-in-Ckitf 



EUCBNB CURALNICK '33 
it ana ting Edilor 



Alfrbda L. Ordway "33 
Atsociatt Editor 



STATE 




NewH Department 
Raymond Royal '34, Edited 
Alfrkda L. Ordway '33 
Ruth D. Campbku- '34 
Harribttb M. Jackson '34 
Mary L. Allkn '35 
Davio L. Arinbbrg '35 
Elizabeth K. HAKRiNtiTON 
Ediih M. Parsons "M 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 
Editorial 

JOSEI'H Poi.ITELLA 

Athletics 
Theodore M. Lbary '35 
Silas Little. Jr. '35 
Glenn K. Shaw '35 



■35 



Feature 

Stanley F. Sbpbrski '34 



Eicbanftea 
Alprboa L. Ordway '33, Editor 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
AdurtUini Manater 

Frank Batitone '34 

W. Lawrence Schenck '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. Gurney '33 

Butin*si Managtr 



Never turn your back on a fraternity 
brother — for he may sink a snowball 
down your neck. 

ss ■ 

Nero fiddled while Rome was burning, 
but Bill Essellen looked for a nickel while 
Q.T.V. was burning. P.S.— Q.T.V. has Uented in Sing Sing Prison, but the ma 
a nickel-in-the-slot phone. | Jority of crimes for which college men 

are jailed are different from those in the 

Nevertheless, many will still find an | case of non-college men, declares Anthony 



"COLLEGE MEN IN SING SING" 

Representatives of All Leading 
Colleges 

All the best known colleges are repre- 



Buslnese Asslatants 

John Wood "35 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Managtr 

Nelson Stevens '35 

GBORCB PBAbB '35 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 

as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as ecoond-claM matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for maJling «t soec 
Su£e provided for In SecUon 1103. Act of October. 1017, authorised Auguet 20, 1918. 



ial rate 



of poetage provided 



^ ^ ^ EDITORIALS ^ 

EDUCATION FOR CRIMINAL EFFICIENCY 

As a shock to many men of taste and refinement, and in particular to those 
modernists to whom the word "education" is an omnii)otent fetish against all social 
evils, has come a report from Sing Sing prison with the information that graduates 
of the lea<ling colleges and universities in the United States have adequate represen- 
tation in that jH-nal institution. We are told how for their transgressions, these 
prisoners are made to share the tasks of prison routine "with men whose mentality 
is that of little chiUlren; underiirivileged boys who have never Inen taught to read 
and write; and foreigners who cannot speak intelligible English." The greatest 
tribute which this re|K)rt can pay to the role of education in developing the moral 
side of a man's life, is to the efTert that college graduates rarely stoop to crimes in- 
volving brute force, or bear the stamp of physical drudgery. Wry few of the col!e^;e 
men in Sing Sing are there for safe-blowing, kidnapping, or murder; their activities 
center principally around forgery and larceny. That is to say, that while there is 
nothing to prevent college men from commiting every crime in the calemlar, tluir 
suix.-rior education, their si)ecialized training by the educative process, leads them 
to what might lie called the "aesthetic" crimes— those requiring subtlety and finesse 
in their execution. 

As far as these facts are concerned, we cannot adopt the attitude of conservative 
broadmindedness, and exclaim, "For shame! For shame! Even college men commit 
crime!", and proceed to console ourselves that after all human nature will always l)e 
what it is. The main consideration must be not so much that college men commit 
crime, but that men with the highest technical education, are employing their trained 
faculties, their dcvelo|)cd sense of what is true and what is nf)t true, their moral 
judgments and their aesthetic judgments, to serve the cause of evil. When we con- 
si«ler the kteiily ileveloiied sense of craftiness which the successful execution of such 
crimes as larceny and forgery demands; when we add to this the intractable guile 
involved in cornering the stock market, in numopolizing industry, in thwarting the 
course of justice when it punishes corjKmitions or organiaiiions which can aflfor<l to 
pay for protection— all these by no means infrequent activities of college graduates— 
we iK'gin to ask, seriously enough, whether or not we are educating for criminal 

efficiency. 

It seems to us, that, in particular, these maladjustments between our social life 
and our moral life are to Iw laid at the door of two principles of our educational 
philosoi)hy which are stressed and practised at the present time. The first of these 
is the notion that if a man has lieen "educated," that is to say, that if he has s|)ent 
from twelve to twenty-five years in educational institutions, he has culled a sufficient 
number of leaves from the tree of knowledge to have appropriated the virtues of 
temiRrrance, of manliness, of courage, and of wistlom. It is the belief that intellectual 
development and morality go hand in hand, and finds expression in the ojiinions of 
such reformers who maintain that the ideal republic lies in the immediate future if 
we will only provide etjual op|)ort unities and schooling facility's for every niemlK-r 
of the social group. Thus a student who has completed a high school training is 
more moral than one who has been only in the elementary schools, l)ecause he has 
had access to more subjects for study. Similarly, greater moral development is to be 
found among college graduates, until in the doctor of jihilosophy degree we have 
abMilute assurance of the fullest development of the Platonic virtues. This t\\K of 
education negleds the fundamental role of character in the development of the 
pcrstmality. It fails to take note of the chasm which lies between knowledge and 
character; the tools of the mind, and the discipline of the nnnd. This notion does 
not understand that after all the intellect, our mental faculties, knowledge, are 
merely tools of our selves, and cannot exist as ends in themselves. They know no 
difference Ix-twcen the rosc-coU)retl glasses, and the eye which looks through them. 
Our knowledge is concerned with theories as to what constitutes good deetls, not 
how to live the good life. Men in the process of being educated today never proffer 
themselves "to W killed and Iwiled" provided that they can be turned out good 
men, but are willing to siurificc themselves with no less ardor to have external 
knowledge of what good men should l)c. 

The second notion, which is, in a sense, merely the logical outcome of the first, 
is the one of whi( h Professor John Dewey, I^ertrand Russell, and other menilxTS of 
the socialist schools, are notable (irotagonists. It is the outcome of the utilitarian 
philosophy which found expression particularly with John Stuart Mill, and makes 
the pragmatic test the criterion of the summum ftowMW -social welfare is the supreme 
test of goo<lncss, and conseciuently of social morality. As Professor Dewey states it, 
"Democracy has many meanings, but if it has a moral meaning, it is found in resolving 
that the supreme test of all |)olitical institutions and industrial arrangements shall 
be the contribution they make to the all-around growih of every memlwr of societv." 
These are the typical doctrines of the pragmatic sch<H)l of philosophy: "the greatest 
goo<l for the greatest numbir," to achieve heahh, wealth, and happiness— these are 
the finalities of life. Is a man a i)hilanthropist? Has he accumulated his fortune by 
insidious means? It is not criminal to have done so, if he will (miy distribute for 
social pur|ioses. This is the social welfare test. These advocates do not understand 
that a man is not goofi because he does goo<l deeds, but that those deeds are go(xl 
only when the heart whi( h prompts them is gof)d. It is all the difference lictween 

(Gontlnusd on Paga 4) 



excuse to attend other religious services 
besi<les Sunday chapels. 

ss 

And still they come to college. The 
f)erennial cute little thing {co-ed) was 
overheard asking her companion (at- 
tendant) at the Clark game, "Why do 
all the players wave their hands and 
fingers in the air before that man in the 
gorgeous striped shirt throws the ball in 
the air? Are they mad at him?" 

ss 

Out of a total enrollment of 3620 stu- 
dents at the University of Detroit only 
77 are men. Wonder what they call the 
other fellows? 

ss 

"Are blondes more intelligent than 
brunettes" was the subject of a debate 
between three blondes and three bru- 
nettes at Wittenburg. By the way, the 
brunettes won the debate but the question 
is still open for discussion. 

■ ss 



A Rutgers professor says that satire is 
the best sign of intelligence and a giggle 
is a sign of insanity. 

It was the night before Pat's condition 
exam. A poor sophomore was having a 
nightmare and this is what his fraternity 
brothers overheard. 

Fair Daffodils, we weep to see 

The thirst that from the soul doth rise. 
And with a stronger faith embrace 

A women well-bred and well taught. 

She is all softness and sweetness 

A sword, a horse, a shield, 
Not marble, nor gilded monuments 

But might I of Jove's nectar sup. 

Tell me not. Sweet, I am unkind 
Or leave a kiss but in the cup. 

Time doth transfix the flourish set on 
youth. 
And sent'st it back to me. 

I sent thee late a rosy wreath 

As quick a growth to meet decay, 

Since when it grows, and smells, I swear 
With the additional accomplishments 
of knowledge and Ixhavior. 

Give me liberty, or give me death! 1 1 



ss 

And they still insist upon calling the 
basketball team the Zebras and let the 
officials get away with those shirts. . . 
Evidently the mezzo-contralto never 
rode one of the Military horses at a slow- 
gallop. . . The dean tried to smooth over 
Mac's embarrassment, but it takes more 
than merely looking on to remember. . . 
Catching forward passes is Bush's special- 
ty .. . especially with Yoik on the throw- 
ing end. . . Alpha Sig's Venus de Milo 
was missing something more than her 
arms the morning after her debut. . . 
The lawns round about the library are 
receiving their usual amount of vitamins. 
ss 

A Purdue University co-ed recently 
called a doctor in great haste one morning 
with what seemed to be a fine case of 
small pox. It all turned out that she 
had taken a shower the night before and 
while still damp (not entirely all wet) had 
donned her polka dot pajamas. It was 
just a case of rash judgment. 



DEBATING SOCIETY AT 

HOLYOKE Y.M.C.A 



A demonstration debate upon the sub- 
ject of war debt cancellation will be held 
f>eforc the Holyoke Y.M.C.A. by mem- 
bers of the M.S.C. debating society to- 
night at eight o'clock. The opposing 
teams are under the managership of 
Nathaniel B. Hill '34. 

The affirmative will be upheld by 
Alden R. Ilodgcn *34 of Hubbardston, 
a former debater at Arms Academy, and 
Arthur S. Gold '36 of Boston, who has 
had experience on the Boston Latin 
team. J. Malcolm Fowler '33 of West 
Newton, and Ashley B. Gurney '33 will 
uphold the negative. The meeting will 
be in charge of Mr. W. M. McDonald of 
the Holyoke Y.M.C.A. 



N. Petersen, Protestant chaplain of the 
prison. College prisoners comntit larceny 
three times as frequently as others; 
forgery is their most popular crime, and 
very rare is the prisoner who has worked 
his way through college, declares Chap- 
lain Petersen in an analysis in Redbook 
for February: 

"Alumni of the best-known colleges 
and universities (including my own) share 
prison tasks with men whose mentality is 
that of a little child, under-privileged 
boys who have never l>een taught to read 
and write, and foreigners who cannot 
speak intelligible English. The son of 
one of the leading educators in America 
has served two terms in Sing Sing — and 
I should not be surprised to see him here 
again. 

"On a single day last week, entirely 
without prearrangement, I had occasion 
to talk with former students of Princeton, 
Cornell, Syracuse, Pennsylvania and Ok- 
lahoma universities. Among other col- 
leges and universities that 1 recall having 
had representatives here are Harvard, 
Yale, Williams, Hamilton, Bowdoin, Ni- 
agara, Dickinson, Fiske, Carlisle, Van- 
derbilt, Michigan, Minnesota, Tennessee, 
Oregon, Iowa, Southern California, Brook- 
lyn Tech, Columbia, Fordham, New York 
Universit>, the University of the City of 
New York, Cambridge, Glasgow, Berlin, 
Paris, Seven Oaks College (England), and 
St. Joseph's College (Holland), besides 
gymnasia and jiedagogia in various Euro- 
pean countries. When a college glee-club 
or choir sings here, there is almost cer- 
tain to be an alumni reunion with at 
least one man who wears the prison gray. 
Sing Sing Culture 
"The intellectual atmosphere of Sing 
Sing is far more cultured than most 
people suppose. Among the inmates are 
exjH'rts in history, literature, journalism, 
philosojihy, comparative philology, science 
ami religion. We have college-trained 
lawyers who usually are glad to give 
legal advice to the other prisoners, and 
doctors who informally prescrilje for 
minor ailments of their fellow-inmates. 
We once had an unfrocked clergyman; a 
brilliant scholar he was, too. One of these 
highly educated men said to me: 'Chap- 
lain, you don't class me with the rest of 
the prisoners here, do you?' 'No,' I 
answered, 'I place you far below ihem. 
They did not have your training, your 
opportunities, your general background. 
So I consider that you are much more to 
be condemned than these other poor 
fellows who never had the chance in life 
that you did.' 

"It is seldom, however, that our college 
men show such a conceited spirit. On 
the contrary, they seem to feel the dis- 
grace of their conviction and imprison- 
ment more intensely than any other group 
of inmates. Usually, too, they think back 
of the punishment to the crime for which 
it was inflicted. But however much a 
highlyeducatedman may feel the disgrace 
of imprisonment and shrink from the 
associations of prison life, his superior 
intelligence prompts him to accept (piietly 
the exigencies of his new situation, and 
as a rule our college men are model 
prisoners. In fact, disciplinary measures 
among them are practically unknown. 

"For economy of prison administra- 
tion, among other reasons, they are not 
often put to such menial tasks as sweep- 
ing up refuse, but are assigned work for 
which their previous training especially 
fits them. So they are to he found in the 
prison library, or doing clerical or secre- 
tarial work in our many offices. The 
present chief clerk in the central office is 
a college-trained expert accountant who 
turned to forgery. Other college men 
work in our well-equipped hospital wards, 
or in our clinics and laboratories. Many 
of the instructors in the school are also 
college men — among whom is one of the 
most remarkable teachers I have ever 
known; and many others are assigned as 
advisers to the inmates who are taking 
advanced studies through corresponflence 
courses. 



No College Professor* 

"To the best of my knowledge, we havt 
not had any school-teachers or collegt 
professors among our prisoners. Whether 
this is because such men do acquire a 
real education at college, or because of 
something connected with the essential 
altruism of their profession, the truth 
remains that those who make teaching 
their life-work do not come to Sing Sing. 
"How does it happen that so many of 
them are in prison? Why should men 
who belong to what is popularly considered 
our most privileged class make such a 
failure of life that they have to be shut 
up behind the bars? A college man now 
at Sing Sing is inclined to lay the blame 
on social and economic conditions. He 
says that in pieriods of financial depression 
the pro[)ortion of highly educated men 
who are in prison should be expected to 
increase, because, in the first place, a 
depression hits earliest and hardest those 
who are holding white-collar jobs, and in 
the second place, these men are used to 
living better and more expensively than 
laborers or mechanics, and so, when the 
crisis comes, they are less able and willing 
to adapt themselves to a lower scale o( 
living. I have not yet been able to get 
any statistical check on this theory; but 
as far as it goes, it sounds plausible. 

"Hard drinking and sexual excesses are, 
of course, nearly always associated with 
a life of crime; but it would take a pro- 
fessional criminologist to say just how far 
they are causes of crime, how far they 
are effects of crime, and to what extent 
they are merely concomitant results of 
the ethical and emotional instability 
which leads to both dissipation and crime. 
As regards college men who are sentenced 
to prison, I am certain that drink and, 
to a less extent, sexual excesses (especially 
when followed by disease) are distinctly 
causes of crime. It is rarely that a 
college man comes here without a history 
of alcoholism, which usually (though not 
(Continued on Pag* 4, Column i) 




Professor Walter E. Prince will lecture 
ne.\t Tuesday, January 24, at the Lang- 
uage and Literature meeting at 0:4.5 on 
"A Modern V'ersion of 'Troilus and 
Cressida'." 

All those interested in forming a 
"Chess aiul Checker Club" arc asked to 
meet Louis Winokur in Memorial Hall, 
Saturday, at 1:30 p.m. 

The cl.iss in Greek for students who 
took the course last term will be held 
every Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. in Clark Hall, 
Room H. The beginners' class will be 
held every Wednesday at 3:20 p.m. when 
tjiere is no assembly. This class will aliO 
be held in Clark Hall, Room B. 



♦ 
* 



Stocf^bribge | 



Harold Pearson, captain of the Stock- 
bridge track team, has been invited to 
participate in the Bishop Cheverus 10(10- 
yard run at the William C. Prout Memo- 
rial Games to be held in the Boston 
Garden, Saturday, January 28th. Thf«' 
games are sponsored by the Kniyhts ol 
Columbus and are the 12th annual indoor 
meet to be staged by that organization 
The event in which Pearson is entered is 
open to runners by invitation only. 



About fifty couples attended 'hf 
Freshman Class Dance on Saturday night 
in the Drill Hall Stockbridge -^cniorr 
and Winter School students were guests 
of the class. Professor and Mrs. tiuy > 
Glatfelter and Mr. and Mrs. Harold ^ 
Smart acted as chaperones. 



JACKIMCZYK SAVES 

GRADUATE ASSIST.\NT 

During Chemistry laboratory on 
January 13, the hydrogen sulfide gen- 
erator became out of order. Hydrogen 
sidfidc is a very deadly and poisonou? 
gas. As it was necessary that the 
Chemistry 25 class should u«r the 
hydrogen sulfide for an experiment 
during the period, Doctor Serex !•'■ 
graduate assistant, went into the room 
where the generator was stationed m 
onler to repair it. He was overcome 
by some of the deadly fumes leaking 
from the generator. He was final') 
revived by the skillful application of 
artificial respiration by Jackinifzy'^ 



•«• 



SPORTS 



* 



* 



Wildcats, Sabrinas Here, 
Fraternity Sports Open 



\SUTE SEXTET MEETS 
TWO VISITING TEAMS 

Coach Red Ball and his Mass. State 
|hocke> sextet will play host to two teams 
on home ice during the coming week, 
I'niversity of New Hampshire on Satur- 
day, and our "across the town" rivals, 
Amiierst College, on Wednestlay, the 25th. 
Both games are scheduled for the after- 

Inoon. 

Disappointed in their efforts to play 
<lK(iiileil games last week due to poor 

lice conditions, the Maroon and White 
pla>crs are going through vigorous prac- 
tice sessions this week in an attem])t to 
keep in good trim for the coming games 

I with the Wildcats and the Sabrinas. 
Niw Hampshire thus far this season 

I has I'l^t its only two games, to Brown and 
to B<j\vdoin. Coach Ernest Christenson 
and his Wildcats are coming down here 
Saturday with the definite intentions of 
chalking up their first victory of the sea- 

Ison. Coach Christenson has seven letter- 

Imen back from last year's team and 

I several promising sophomores around 

1 which his present team has been built. 
His probable lineup will include George 
Bachellor and Tuck White, defense men, 
Charlie Doloff, goalie, and George Abbe 
and Francis McSwinney as wings. On 
the basis of past performance, Mass. 
State should win this game because the 
State sextet forced Brown into an over- 
time fieriod before succumbing, whereas 

I the Wildcats gave Brown no such battle. 
Coach "Red" Richardson has built his 

I present Sabrina hockey edition around 
four lettermen — Captain Frank Fonl, 
Bill Pomeroy, Bill Owen and Finley 
Greene. In addition. Coach Richardson 

I has two other veterans, Sam Badger and 
Bob Flint as well as several promising 

[sophomores including Harry Thomas, 
Jack Grose and Ike Patch with which to 
fill the vacant places and provide replace- 
ments Amherst has not played any 
games this year, as yet, and no forecast^ 
can be made of its probable strength. 
Last year, Mass. State had no difficulty 
in overcoming the Sabrinas, emerging 
victorious from Ixjth struggles. 



WINNERS in BASKETBALL 
LOSE in VOLLEYBALL 

In the first week of interfraternity 
athletics. Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Phi 
Epsilon, Kappa E|)silon, and Kappa 
Sigma were the winners in basketball, 
but the losers in volleyball. Phi Sigma 
Ka|>pa lo.st its basketball game with 
Lambda Chi, but won the volleyball. 
Delta Phi Alpha and Alpha Sigma Phi 
were the other winners in volleyball. 
Mueller of Lambda Chi pile<l up sixteen 
[xjints to lead the scorers in the Lambda 
Chi- Phi Sigma Kappa game; while Bige- 
low led in the .Sig Ep-Delta Phi Alpha 
match. On the other nights, Joe Coburn 
made .seven baskets for Kappa Sig; and 
Consolatti hel|H;d his Kappa Kp mates 
sink Alpha Sig by tossing six through the 
hoo|). The summaries: 
Tuesday, January 10 



SIftma Phi Epallon 


Delta Phi Alpha 






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Wednesday, 


January II 








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Prices Reasonable No Cover Charge We Satisfy 

Phone 632-\V— Amherst, Mass.— 7 Northampton Rd. 



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Mr. Parker, creator of famous Parker Duofold Pens, Ixilieves this new marvel is as 

great an advance in pens as Free Wheeling and Four Wheel Brakes are to 

Automobiles.— SEE THE NEW "PARKER" 



A.J. Hastings 



NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



WOOL SCARFS 

for 

Snowy Weather 

or Skating 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



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Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions 1 illed. Broken lenses 

accurat'ly replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

1 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



IDA M. BRIDGEMAN 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
12.3 Main St. Tel. G7-J Amherst, Mass. 



Just Out— WORLD ALMANAC— 50c 



Van Dine's KENNEL MURDER CASE 
$2.00 



Fl N IN BED 
The Convalescent's Handbook— $2.00 

-mes Cozzen's, THE LAST ADAM 
The doctor in a small Connecticut town 
$2.60 



BOX FILES— 50c 

CARD INDE.X CABINETS 
Box with Co\er, Index and 100 Cards— 7 5c] 

SCRATCH PADS 
2 for 5c 

TYPEWRITER PAPER 
500 Sh« ts 7 9c 

WEBSTER'S DICTIONARIES— 50c 



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SPORTS CALENDAR 

Wednesday, January 18 

'.i.'M) p III. N'arsiiy Hookey. VVilli.tmii. here 
h.UOu.ni. Varsity Basketball. Williams in 

State Cane 
9.15 p.m. Interfraternity Gaines, Phi SiKUia 

Kappa VH. .Alpha Sicma Phi 
Thursday, January 19 

liilrrfrateriiity Kainex. Thota Chi vs. Delta 

Phi .Mpha at S.:U) p.m. 
l.uinbd.i t'hi Aliiha vs. .Mpha l^iaiiima Kho 

at H.l.'i p.m. 
Saturday, January 31 

M.Ol) p.m. Varsity Basketball, C'oniuvliiut 

AKUie at ^I..'^.C. 
H..SO p.m. X'arsity Hockey, New Hampshire 

at M.S.C. 
Tuesday, January 24 

O.IK) p.m. Interfraternity itaiiiet). Lambda 

(hi Alpha vs. Alpha Sit^ma Phi 
Wednesday, January 35 

;i.30 p.m. Xarsity Hockey, .\mhcrst, here 
Interfraternity Games, Sigma Phi Epsilun 

vs. Thcta Chi at 8.30 j).m. 
Phi Siitma K.ippa vs. Kapp.i Kpsilon at 

U.15 p.m. 



^ 
^ 



Zbvxx tbc Iknot l5olc 



•*• 



This tolumnist s.iys: Wilii.iins will 
beat State by ten |>oints. Hush, Lojko 
and company are 25 points l)etter than 
Connecticut Aggie. 



Did you know that the Maroon and 
White hoop leader said he had a date 
with an angel the other night? 



Lou Bush was the guest of honor at the 
Farmington, Conn. High School football 
ban(|uct last week. Lou presented the 
football letters and said he had a great 
time trying to pronounce some of the 
names of the Connecticut lads. 



Much praise is due to Larry Hriggs and 
his committee for their judicious decision 
to abolish the ten-second rule in the 
High School Basketball Tournament to 
be held at Massachusetts State the com- 
ing March. The committee feels that 
the game as |)layed under the old rule 
was sufficiently fast and fatiguing for the 
young high school players an«l that as 
one of the aims of the tourney is to 
promote heahh, use of the ten-.socon<l rule 
would have destructive results on the 
health of the contestants. 



The Yale News writes that Yale is 
planning to tievote more time to basket 
ball. Oh my! 



The cheer leaders have lieen conspicu- 
ous by their absence at the basketball 
games. As they arc under its suinrvision 



SHOWS ITS INFLUENCE IN 

SPENCER'S FAIRIE QUEENE 

(Continued from Pag* I) 

Edmund Spencer was but one in whose 
work the |>rin( iples of Platonism are 
found. Ill tin- great allegory of the Fairc 
yu<eiif, the <luality of man's nature is 
nafTirintd. The Knight .ind t'n;i tin 
Ixxliments of true manho<i<l ami true 
love, Plato coneeivetl them pass through 
,ill till- trials to which man is subject. 
With the ai<l of Una, the Knight battles 
with FalsehoofI, L'nfailh, Pride, Joyless- 
ness, an<l Despair until fnially he piissed 
thnjugh the less clestructive phases of 
life and defeated the dragon of the Essen- 
tial .Sin. Nations an<l < ivilizations must 
fight I hex- b.ittles as the Knight fought 
theni. Thus in the Fairie (^iieene are 
foun<l emlKxIiefl the <once|jts of Platf>. 

Mr. Troy in coik hiding, .inaKzefl con- 
1em|x)rary thought and pliilosfiph>' in 
regard to Christian Platonism. "Natural- 
ism because it took n«) regarri for the 
|)rin( i|)ies of Jesus or Plato is dvinn; '• 
was an absuni philosoph>. From the 
chaos of toda\'s t h(»iii{ht there; is JdiK 
one way out. Chiistian Platonic thought 
must Ik? the bas-is for the return to vital 
reliKion, it must be the basis of the 
religion of worship whi(h must Ik; sa\ed 
at all cost from an empty humanitarian- 
ism on the one hand and what is only too 
often blocKlless mysticism on the fjther." 



VOLLEYBALL RESULTS 

Tuesday, January 10 

D<Ua Phi Alpha defeated Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

I.Vf) and l.")-H. 
Phi Sigma Kappa defeated Lambda Chi Alpha, 
I.Vl and \rj-:i. 
Wednesday, January II 

Ali)ha Sisma Phi defeated Kappa Eps.lon, 
I. '.-6 and l.")-l.'{. 
Friday, January 13 

Delta Phi Alpha defeated Kappa Sigma, \r,-!i\ 
and 1.5-H. • 



Ellertmen Win Twice; 

Play Williams Here 



YOU CAN DEPEND ON IT 

When Nunn-Bush puts a price on a shoe, the value is there. It will serve you 

better— give you more comfort and keep its good looks 

longer than a shoe that sells for less. 



PURPLE QUINTET HAS 
WON FOUR, LOST ONE 

Having gained decisive victories over 
Clark and Midillebur>', the Maroon and 
White basketball court men will engage 
in two varsity contests this week, UHCt- 
ing a iHJwerful Williams College quintet 
in .XiiduTst on J.uuiar\- IS and .i mediocre 
t'oiiiu'cticut .Aggie lise beri' on Jan. '21. 

This is the tirst year that basketball 
has been a major spoit at Williams, t lu- 
st iident louucil voUil tin- (liange, basing 
the decision ii|)on the fact that basketball 
is one of the few sports in whii It the 
Purple have been able to hold their own 
with the larger colleges and universities 
of t he I-'ast . 

The Connecticut Aggie basketball team, 
faster, smoother and more |K)werful tli.m 
any Blue anil White aggregation in 
several years, has won two of its three 
games this season. Conneiticut Aggie 
o|)ened its .schedule with a .■};i-28 win 
o\er the Alumni. In its second game, the 
Blue and White team gained a '.i'A-22 
triumph over Upsala College, a team 
which Middlebiiry defeated decisively. 
Ill the third game, however, the Aggies 
met a tartar in the Boston Univ-ersity 
combination, and were overwhelmed, 
50-2;'), with Levitow and Daniels leading 
the Connecticut attack. 



the S<^n.ite should make sure that the 
cheer leaders are in action at the hoop 
contests. More co-operation and en- 
thusiasm on the part of the student IxMly 
is tiesired by the cheer lea«fers. They 
worked very hard at the football games 
to arouse enthusiasm for the Maroon 
and White grid forces but the State 
students were too in<li(Terent (or t<M» 
lazy) to cheer for the team. All the 
varsity coaches and players are ojK'nly 
disap|N)iiite(! with the failure of the 
students to sr.p|Kjrt the varsity teams by 
cheering at the games. 

Don't miss the Wdliams game tonight! 
It will Ik- the best contest played at 
home this season. 



Mass. Stata 
B. 



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STATE FIVE SHOWS 
MUCH IMPROVEMENT 

Smarting uiuler the <lisastrous ilefeat 
at Yale, Coach Fiei|<|y Ellert's greatly 
improveil Mass.ii Imsetts .State cptiiitet 
exhibited a sparkling brand of ofTensive 
b.isketball to gain <-oiiviiicing victories 
o\i-i Clark and Middlebiir> last week. 
The Maroon and White hoopsters far 
outclassed a courageous Clark University 
ttam on J.inuary 11, ,').'> .'ill, with Lou 
Bush sioiiii^ IH |Kiints to lead the Elleit- 
men. On January 12, Joe Lojko diipli- 
i.ited Bush's scoiiii^ feat of t he previous 
imkI", the .Slate kit forwani amassing 18 
IMiiiils lo feature the victory of the 
Maroon and While live over Mi«ldl«buryv 
■1S;{|. 



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Captain Corliss of Middlebury s;ink a 
basket t»i give the Vermont«rs an early 
lead. P'awcett and Bush tossed in <l(mble- 
deckers for State but then Middlebury 
Itroke through the Mai(Min and White 
defense with a basket by Sweet and fouls 
by Hoyle and Corliss. Hush sank a long 
shot and I'lagg tossed in a great left- 
handi'd shot for the Panther live. Batim- 
garlner sank a foul for Middlebury and 
Lojko drop|H-d in a b.isket for State. 
Then the Ellert men's offense began to 
function antl iloiiran, Fawccti, Nassif 
and Lojko scored t win-|Kiiiiters for Slate. 
Micldlebiiry cut clown the Maroon and 
White lead on baskets by Sweet and Hoyle 
just before' tin- half endecl, State leading, 
20 14. 

The play ol the Maroon .iiicl While 
fi\-e in the last two games has Im-c-ii very 
promising and there is every |)ros|K'et for 
a suci cssful season if the St.ite defense 
continues to improve. Bush .ind l.ojkp 
pla>'ed sensational offensi\'e basketl)all in 
the- Clark and .Middlebury coiilestH. 
Nassif, a sopboniore, has exhibilecl a 
briiliaiH brand of defensive play and 
C.iplaiii Hoiir.in's work in the last two 
names gives strong evidence that the 
.Maroon anci While leader is rounding 
back into his old-time, clever style of 
pla> . The- line-up: 



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wool. ZII'PKR COATS - Xt.w «:{.7r> 
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BASS SKI Bf)OTS $6.50— LE.ATHKK TOP RUBBERS $5.15 
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Iji 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 18. 1933 



NETTLETON SHOES 

A complete factory assortment of Nettleton Shoes will be on display at our store January 20th and 21st. 

Come in and see the latest styles at reduced prices. 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



EDITORIALS 
(GontlniMd from Patt* 3) 

external ki.<)Nslc.l«f, c.hl iind traiisieni, and intirnal, living kno\vk-<iKf, i^riHtual and 
cvfrlasting. Tlify fail to u-ali/c that social iiistonis and iKjlltical institutions art- 
merely projections of our inner nature. If there is evil in the worl.l it is %ve who have 
placed it there, and to exterminate all s<m ial evils we must work not on their external 
forms, but on their internal roots. We cannot agne vvith the insistence that ref(;rin 
in our .stK-ial life should start with the institution, and not with the mdivulual. A 
criminal taken out of his criminal environment, is still a criminal. College gra.luates 
who in spile of the advantages of privileged ass.K iatio.is and lile on a high mental 
plam, c.nnnit larceny, forgerv, and crimes which heaven alone records, since they 
are never discovered, arc brilliant exami.les of the falsehoo.l of this "en vironn.entalisl 
doctrine The depression is no more a cause of crime, than the >ea is the lause of a 
man's being drowne.l. The so. ial welfare test extols too much the immediate, over- 
emphasizes the a. tion of environment upon character, and neglects the developm< tit 
of ideals whi.h ar.- essential |.hases of that moral law which is perpetual and e%er 
lasting. It mak.-s so<i.ty a great Cod who can sim.tion llagrant immoralities, even 
pillage an<l slaughter, if can be shown that such crimes benefit a nation, and permit 
its peoples to live in health, wealth, and hap|.iness. Hetween social morality and 
absolute morality, our theorists have l.iid an unbridgalile gap. • ■• 

When. then, shall we cease to educate for < riminal etHi. ienc> ? When wdl this 
shariKMiing of wits, this developing of the intellect, be made t.. keep company with 
the .levelopn.ent of the character, of the inner inoial .en^'^ When shall we cease to 
extol intelle.tual efficiencv. subtlety, craft, domination, and raise the virtuous lite 
to llu pe<lestal on which it belongs? Our training of the intellect teaches men to 
sharpen iheir knives, but fails to show them how they are to be used. Hence the 
mis;ipplicalion of e<lucation; heme knowledge |H-rverted to the cause of evil. Our 
prisons will have "educate<l inmates only so long as we neglect the traming of 
character as an aim in iducation. .So long as we are willing to In-lieve that external 
knowledge makes for morality; so long as we glorify < riminality because it is on a 
large scale or executed with enviable cunning; so long as our individual salvation 
must be surrendered to the welfare of the s(x ial group, and no attempt us made to 
awaken that inner knowledge of realities which resides in the innermost depths of 
our being so long as this lasts, let us not lie disconcerte<l because even college men 

become criminals. 

♦ • » • 

EDITORIAL MISCELLANEA 

We are told that at the North Dakota State College a surxey recently conducted, 
shows that the student Ixnly is more intelligent than the faculty. The students are 
Siiiil to stay at home more, and .levote more time to their work than do the pedagogues. 

* * • * 

Describing the scene of an examination at Oxfonl. Mr. Geoffrey Wilson, a mem- 
ber of the Oxford debating team now touring the East, said to students at W'esi 
Virginia llniversit>, "First we light our pipes and sit around discussing the subject 
for three quarters of an hour. Then we start to write. And if you get stuck, you can 
always ask your next-door neighbor who will probably have something you don't 
know." In answer to a horrified gasp, he continued. "This is all e\|M-cted. You see, 
you can' write a painr unless \ou know a little something alx)Ut the subject. The\ 
just want to check up tosee what you're doing."— (NSFA) 



AGORA 
(Continued from Patfe 2) 

invariably) kgan during his undergradu- 
ate days. 

Not Murder 

"College men are seldom convicted of 
ofTenscs wht re either force or intimidation 
is involved, or even extreme physical 
exertion. They are not likely to become 
human flies, or cat burglars, or safe- 
blowers, or holdup men or racketeers, 
oT kidnajxrs, or mail-coach robbers. 
They are not addicted to the crime 
passionel. It is very rarely that, for any 
cause whatever, they commit murder 
Since I came to Sing Sing seventeen years 
ago. only one college man has been 
electrocuted. 

"As compared with the present inmates 
of Sing Sing who have only attended 
high school, the prisoners who have 
attended college have, in pro|)ortion to 
their total numlK-r. conimitled only one- 
eighth as many robberies (robkry being 
a crime that involves i^rsonal violence or 
the threat of violence), but they have 
committtcl three times as nian> larcenies. 
The typical college man's crime is taking 
money that does not Ixlong to him. while 
the owner is not watching, and doing this 
in what seems the easiest and safest way. 
"Of all crimes, college men seem most 
addicted to forgery. In view of the fact 
that this is one of the easiest crimes to 
detect, and also one of the easiest on 
which to obtain a conviction, their 
partiality to it would seem to supjxjrt 
the contention of the prisoner who 
doubts whether, after all, one gets an 
education in college. 

"I cannot recall that I ever talked with 
a prisoner here who had worked his way 
through college. 

Raisinft Your Boy 
"I venture to suggest how you can 
prepare your boy for college in such a 
way that his experiences there will not 
head him toward a State prison. First 
and foremost, see to it that he has a 



essential relation Ixtween money and 
work. Give him the largest allowance 
chat you can afford and that it seems 
wise for him to have, and then make him 
keep rigidly to it— but do not tempt him 
to lie by insisting on his accounting for 
every last cent of it. If he really needs 
more money than you can afford to give 
him, show him how he can earn it himself. 
If you want what is pretty nearly a one 
hundred fxrcent insurance against his 
ever going to prison, Ut him earn at 
least a part of his college exjx^nses. 

"Do not baby him. Treat him like 
the man that he already thinks he is. 
Encourage him in his awkward and often 
annoying attempts at self-expression and 
self-determination. When he gets into 
trouble Ixcause of his immature judgment, 
do not pull him out so cjuickly that he 
fails to connect cause and effect. Do not 
spoil him, and do not nag him. The one 
is as bad as the other. Give him every- 
increasing freedom while he is living 
with you — with the burdens and re- 
sfxjnsibilities and hard knocks that are 
inseparable from any true freedom— and 
he will not misuse the larger indeix-ndence 
of the college years." 

— Courtesy Redbook Magazine 



MACLINN ATTENDS 

N.S.F.A. CONVENTION I 
(Continued from Psft« I) 

able to govern themselves as efficicntlvl 
as here. Many colleges still have fn^j 
cha|X'ls a week at which attcndantt ^1 
compulsory. At others, the students arj 
not permitted any cuts from clas-i-, 
is well known that Massachusetts St^j 
is one of the few colleges in the ct/untrjl 
which has been able to maintain thtl 
honor system. In fact, most of the JrrJ 
provements recommended as bein^^ nc. 
and constructive, we have had at Mam| 
State for a numlxr of years. 

The organization this year rnuvj 
letters of commendation from LotJ 
President Hoo\er and President -decjl 
Roosevelt for the constructive worj 
which it has accomplished. Next yia: 
the convention is to be held at Wa hing.l 
ton. D.C.. and a fine array of t,il(m«l 
and nationally-famous s|x'akersare xlur,.! 
uled to apix'ur. 



SKI TOGS AND 

SKATING TOGS for 

STATE COLLEGE 

MEN and WOMEN! 

COLODNY 

CLOTHING 

CO. 

32 MAIN ST. 

{Near _ Depot) 

NORTHAMPTON, 
MASS. 

We stock full line of Ladies 

Ski Pants, Jackets, Ski Boots 

and Riding Habits. 

(Free Carfare on Purchases 
of $5.00 or over) 



FISHER'S 

YARDLEY'S 

Compacts 
Toilet Water 
Dusting Powder 
Face Powder 
Talcum Powder 
Complexion Cream 
Bath Salts 



WOMEN'S LITTLE SYMPHONY 

IN SOCIAL UNION PROGRAM 
(Continued frona Paft* 1) 

s;ite. The remainder of the program 
ranged from the somber tones of the 
"Valse Triste" of Silx-lius to the graceful 
"Minuette" of the "L'Arlesienne Suite 
No. 1." The immortal "First Movement 
from the Unfinished Symphony" of 
Franz 55chulx*rt, as the second selection 
of the orchestra, was enthusiastically re- 
ceived by the audience. 

The program consisted of the following 

selections: 

Overture to Oberon Welier 

First Movement from the Unfinished Symphony 

Scbut>ert 
Violin Solo, Fantasia on Gounod's Faust 

Miss Shaw de Sarasate 

home that always faces life squarely and L'Arlesienne Suite No. l Bizet 

. • • 1 <• f L ^ I (a) Prelude 

honestly, without foolish pretenses, un- ' 

convincing evasions or overemphasis on 
su|x-rficialities. A home that is less than 
fully honest in its attitude toward what 
may seem very inconsequential matters 
makes it easier for its children, later on 
in life, to be dishonest in what the law 
considers very important matters. So 
live within your income, even if that dees 
entail some sacrifices. Do not pretend 
to be what you are not, or to have what 
you do not have. 

"Very early in life begin to teach your 
boy financial responsibility, and the 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

14 MAIN STREET 
LB«twMn Town Hall and MmobIc Buildla* 

$2.25 

1.50 

.40 

1.25 

.30 

.25 



(b) Minuetto 




(c) Adagietto 




(d) U Carillon 




To A Wild Rose 


MacDowell 


Valae Triste 


Sibelius 


Parade of the Wooden Soldiers 


Heme 


Finlandia 


Sibeliut 



REV. J. PAUL WILLIAMS 

SUNDAY CHAPEL SPKAKEll 
(Continued from Pat* 1) 

At some time in our lives, ever> oiu ii| 
us needs integration. First of all, knoJ 
what you want, want something wonhJ 
of yourself, and you will achieve iriK^ 
tion. A f)urfK)se gives concentration anJ 
Mr. Williams cited the case of the latJ 
war, when, with the war psycholog\ upal 
us, our country was able to do sonuthinji 
big. By focusing the mind on a ilifiniti 
point, the trifles along the way— whidi 
make for disintegration — were forKOttfif 
Secondly, the achievement of a seial 
of humor is necessary for integratioil 
''A sense of humor is nature's disinfecil 
ant." And by a sense of humor is tidl 
meant making practical jokes or kin 
campus funny man, but rather b< in>; a^«| 
to laugh at oneself. 

Thirdly, utilize the power of liray«| 
insisted the six^aker. Some of us have mtl 
outgrown our childish idea of (irayetl 
Our prayer must not belittle us or till 
god prayed to. The rational plea is "in 
Lord, may I know thy spirit," rattie| 
than "Oh Lord, give my ... I pray.' 
"The value of prayer is that it forces i 
to look at the highest, not the lowe>t.' 



MEN'S HHOLE SOLES and 

RUBBER HEELS 

MEN'S HALF SOLES and 

RUBBbR HEELS 

MEN'S RUBBER HEELS 

LADIES* HALF SOLES and 

RUBBER HEELS 

LADIES* RUBBER HEELS 

LADIES' LEATHER HEELS 

All Work Guaranteed 



Everything in Hardware 

and Radio Equipment 



=PHILCO= 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



/^* rHfAfMf '^'l 



Typing 
First Class Work Low Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



THURS. 
JAN. 

19 



Edw. C. Robinson 

Behe Daniels 

in 

'SILVER DOLLAR" 



FRl. 

JAN. 

20 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

TH[ MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



SAT. 
JAN. 

21 



Warren William 

Lili Damita 

in 

"MATCH KING" 



Kathleen Norris' 
'SECOND HAND WIFE' 

with 
Sally Eilers-Ralph Bellamy 

— plus— 

JACK OAK IE - in 

'UPTOWN NEW YORK' 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"Let Dave do it" 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS| 
Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 

JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE NOW GOING ON 

Record breaking values in every department 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



MON. 

JAN. 

23 



Ruth Chatterton 

in 
FRISCO JENNY' 



TUES. 

JAN. 

24 



Lee Tracy 

in 

"HALF NAKED 

TRUTH" 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE PRICES 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, • MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



WED. 

JAN. 

25 



Robert Armstrong 
Constance Cummings 

in 

"BILLION DOLLAR 

SCANDAL" 



THE CANDY KITCHEN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 



SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 



INCORPORATED 



'^'^'^^'^'^'^'^^'^'1^ 

♦ 




Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 19.^3 



Number 13 



''Troilus and Criseyde" is 
Subject of Prof. Prince 



'""^^'ciS'u.^T'S.u Edith Wynne Mathison 



TO SMITH IN MARCH 



Old Leftend Traced from Homer to' 
Present Time 



Tracing the <k'veloi)nu'nt of the U-nend 
ol Troilus ami Grists (U- from Honur to 
the present, Professor Walter E. Prince 
of tlie Entilish tiepartment s|)oke on "The 
Md'krnization of Chaucer's Troilus and 
Crist\(le" at the Language and Literature 
nieeiing last evening. Professor Prince 
b.is.(l his talk on CH.'orge Phillip Krapp's 
version of the great |K>eni puldi^hed last 

year. 

"The Troilus and Criseyde legend be- 
^.111 with Homer. Although he did not 
mention Criseyde," Professor Prince said, 
"there are references in his work to 
Troilus, the son of Priam who was king 
of Troy." The earliest references to 
Troilus after Homer ap|x-ar in the works 
of two men: Dictys who wrote in the 
fourth century and Dares who wrote in 
the sixth century. Although the works 
of these two men are consi<lered forgeries, 
Chaucer referred to them as his authori- 
ties for the legend of Troilus and Criseyde. 

Benoit de Sainte-More in his (xietic 
btody, "Roman de Troie," first gives the 
(Continued on Pag* 3, Column 1) 



PROF. SPEIGHT, CHAPEL 
SPEAKER NEXT SUNDAY 



Former Pastor of King's Chapel in 
Boston 



Professor Harold E. B. Sjx'ight of 
Dartmouth College will speak at the 
next Sunday chapel, January 29. Mr. 
Sixight has l^ecn a professor in t,he 
bio}4ra|jliy department at Hanover since 
1U2<). 

Previous to this |K>sition the sjn'aker 
was professor of pliilosoj)hy at the same 
college. Since his graduation from the 
University of Al)erdeen in S<otland in 
1 '.•(•<) he has tlone a variety of work 
r.in^;ing from studying at Oxford and 
Tufts where he received his D.D. degric 
in 102.^5, to serving as jxistor at King's 
ChaiK'l, Boston. After his resignation 
from the latter (X)sition which he held 
from 1921-1927 he took up his duties at 
Dartmouth. In addition to his t« ai hing 
and I hurch duties he acted as chaplain 
owrsias during 1918-19. At present he 
i.-* literary editor of the Christian Leader, 
and also has written several books, among 
tlictn. Life and Writings of John Bunyan, 
ami ( 'mi live Lives. 




PROF. WALTKR E. PRINCE 
On Modern Version of Chaucer 



TEN MUSIC CONCERTS 
IN AMHERST VICINITY 

Seidel, Chernavisky Trio, and Eddy 
in Amiierst Series 



With the Hoi-ton and Dttioit Sym| bony 
Orchestras and V'ehudi Menuhin, vio- 
linist, scheduled to apfwar at Smith 
College; the Chernavisky Trio and Toscha 
Seidel in ihe Amherst Community Con- 
cert Series; and Harold Auer, piani-<t, at 
Springfield, lovers of music in Amherst 
and vicinity will he olfered many opinir- 
tunities to listen to the Ix'st in music 
inter|)retation this winnr. The Slate 
College Mu>ical Cli.bs and tin- D.irt- 
mouth Coll«-ge Musical CIuIjs are the 
only two org.ini/.at ions si lied uled to 
apjxar in Uowker .Xuditorium. 

The dates and Krou|)s which are to 

appear an<l which are accessible to State I 

College stud«n1s follow: ; 

Feb. 11 — IX-troit Symphony Orchi-sira ! 

Sinitli <oll<-Kc .S:(K) 
Feb. 17 — Dartmouth Colk'KP MusUal < liihs 

S(K ial fnion K:(X) 
Feb. 22 — Toscha St-iclol, X'iolinist | 

Amherst fomm. Concert 8:30 i 
Feb. 2.V-State CoIIck.- .Mu^i<al ( lubs | 

Sxial Inion 7:0t) 
Feb. 27 — Chernavi.sky Instrunifntul Trio | 

.\mh«Tst ( omiii. Concert S^TO i 
Feb. 2S — Boston Symphony Orrlicstra 

Smith Collctie H:t)0 
Mar. 6 — Harold Baiifr. pianist | 

Sprinufield Conim. Concert H:'M 
Mar. 10 — Vehudi Mcnuliin, violinist 

Smith College 8:(X) 
April 19 — Nelson Eddy, tenor 

.Xmtierst Comm. Concert H:'M) 
May 6— ("lior;il ton .rt Smith Vt,»<-K<- H:(K) . 



Massuchusetti State Has Kepresen* 
tat ion 

Massachusetts Stale, to^tthtr with 
thirty other colleges, will send delegates 
to the si.xth annual assembly of the Mo«lel 
League of Nations of New ICngland Col- 
leges which is to be held at .Smith College 
on March 9, 10, and 11. Rich delegate 
to the assembly will attempt to present 
the actual attitude of the cotmtry which 
he represents in the tliscussions planned 
for this year. 

Address«'s by Prc-sident King of Amherst 
and by President Neilson of Stnith will 
o|)en the meeting of the League aiul the 
jirocedurc will la* in the hands of an 
executive committee. The countries to 
be represented by Massachusetts State 
College delegates have not yet Ixen 
assigned. 

There are to be three committees this 
year. The Disarmament Conimittee, 
headed by Kulh Lawson of Mount 
Holyoke will discuss its problem from 
the angle of the manufacture and saU- of 
arms. The Political Committee on the 
Bolivia- Paraguay tlispute, under the 
leadership of E. A. Thompson of Tufts 
will talk on the basis of wh.it the League 
of Nations can do to stop war. The 
Economic Conmiittee will discuss the 
gold standard and tariff; lulna Bre&iult 
of Wellesley and Mr. Silant of Harvard 
will act as its diairmen. Another feature 
of this year's Model League is the Com- 
mittee of Nineteen whiih will consider 
the Sino-Ja|>anese dispute. 

On the first lw<j d 'vs v.irious <|uestions. 



To Appear on Friday 




Social I'nitm Presents Noted Reader 
<»f Shalcespcarcan Roles 



KUITII WYNNK MATI'IIISON 
In .Shakes|ieurean Roles 



INCREASE OF TUITION 
VOTED BY TRUSTEES 



Freshman Knrollment Again Limited 
to Three Hundred 

A consideration of the depleted con- 
dition of the State treasury prompted 
the Board of Trustees to raise the tuition 
for State College students by forty 
dollars in their meeting of January 19. 
The Trustees also voted to limit the 



dis;.rmainent, the Bolivia-P.iraguay dis- , «nrollnient of the next freshmen class to 
pute and the Sino-Jaiwnese diffiruhies. '•'"'<' '"""I'**! ;""! I<> ^'sk the State 
will be .liscussed by slan.ling <onunil1.es I legislature for ten thousiind dollars to Ik> 
of the League, following the procedure , <'>**d to aiti needy students. 



of the International League at Ceneva. 
On M.ir< h II the resf>liit ions of these 
commitlees will be acted ii|K>n by the 
General Assembly, to be held in John M. 
tirtene Hall. The e.irlier dis< usj>i(ms will 
bi held in various buililings and are not 
ojx-n to the publi<-, although the gallery 
of John M. (ireene will Ih' opcfi to si)CC- 
tators on the last <lay. 



Technocracy to Smash Price System with Energy 

Money; Has Good Objective, Says Dr. Cance 



Biiausc of the widespread use of the 
newly-invented term "Terhno<racy," the 
C()!!ctii,i), has asked Dr. A. E. Cance of 
the Agricultural Economics department 
tu explain the implications of the idea. 
'n this article Ur. Cance sets forth the 
premises and promises of this economic 
theory.— firfj/or. 

Technocracy is the far-sounding title 
assumed by a group of scientists, tech- 
nologists and engineers who for several 
>cars have been engaged in conducting 
an energy survey of North America. The 
director is Howard Scott; their head- 
luarters the Engineering Department of 
Columbia University. The word "tech- 
nocracy," practically unknown six months 
■'*?'>. 1=; now on every tongue, thanks to a 
oallyhoo unequalled since the mah jong 
craze. In spite of the wide publicity the 
stalls of technocracy's program arc 
still obscure. This is due in part to 
secrecy, in part to presumably authorita- 
''vc interpretations, later repudiated, and 
'" P'lrt to the almost unintelligible lang- 
'^age technocracy speaks. 

'" scneral the Energy Survey is first 
^n inventory of natural resources, includ- 
"|g materials and power; second, a study 



of the 



'ise of energy, measured perhaps in 



'ergs, calories or kilowatts, in the conver- 
sion of thc^e n sources into usable gornls 
; and their distribution to us< rs; third 
I (probably) a study of consumption or 
! utilization based on em rgy requirements. 
I Up to this point the program is one of 
physical science and engineering, anfl 
there is no reason why the Collegian 
should ask an economist rather than a 
physicist, a chemist, an cngintcr or a 
linquist to review the technocratic pro- 
gram. 

The only defensible reason for scientific 
study, mechanical invention, or techno- 
logical improvement is that it may serve 
humanity, directly or indirectly. The 
final objective of technocracy is a happy 
human race, sharing fairly the full fruits 
of the rapid mechanization of industry, 
enjoying the leisure which tremendous 
technological improvements make possi- 
ble and continually increasing the stand- 
ard of living. 

Under the present organization of 
society, mechanical energy displaces men. 
These discharged men cannot find ern- 
1 ployment, for feeble men, rated at one 
tenth horse power each, cannot Ik- used 
efficiently in modern industry. R.iilroads 
(Contliiucd on P«g« 4. Column i) 



Lew Corey and Band to 

Play for Mardi Gras 

Marrxin Key's costume ball, the Mardi 
Ciras, will be held on I'ritlay night, 
February '.i in the Drill H.ill. The com- 
miltee in < liarge has se( uretl the strvites 
of Lew Corey and his ele\en |)iece or- 
chestra from the Hotel NouoMk k. Tlie 
orchestra will ap| «ar in Kistuine. 

The committee has det ided that no 
rouple will be admitted without some 
type of <«)Sluiu«- ami is ready to aid 
anyone in the procuring of a costume, 
should flilTiculty Ix- ex|)erieni e<l. Tickets 



In their resolution iiu r<'asing the 
tuition, the Trusttes staled th.it fmam ial 
exigeiK ies of the .State are the rc.isons for 
their action ratlur ih.in the Ixlief that 
btiKlents should pay part of I heir e«lu- 
cational costs. Tin- r< solution also pro- 
vided that .several fees which are now 
paid, such as llu- gcniral laboratory, 
health, and matriculation fees, be absorbed 
into the tuition charge. In conseqiient-c 
the net tuition in( reas*- is $2] JA) for 



In ICdith Wynne Matthison, who will 
ap|HMr here as a reacUr of ShakesjM'arean 
roles Kriday, January 27 at 7 p.m., the 
Social Union presents a versatile and 
talentetl artist. Miss Matthison is known 
here and in ICurope as an actress of note- 
worthy accomplishments, a master of 
diction and of emotional subtlety. The 
progr.im of Shakes|iearean readings which 
she is to give here re|»resents but one 
phase of her ability. 

Miss Matthisrjn was awarded the gold 
medal for good diction on the stage by 
the American Academy of Arts and 
Letters in 1927. In the same year she 
was made an honorary M.A. of Mount 
Holyoke College. For two years she was 
lecturer in the H|)eech de|)artment of 
that College, and is now lecturer in 
English literature and drama. Resides 
her rlireclive work at Mount Holyoke, 
she has given a series of Shakes()earian 
readings there once a month, including 
scenes from "Love's I.<-ilM>urs Lost," "The 
Merchant of Venice," "Twelfth Night," 
(Continued on Pag* 4, Column 3) 

AVIATION TRAINING 
OFFERED COLLEGE MEN 

U. S. Naval and Marine (]orp« Build- 
in(t Up Reserve 

In orclir to build up a reserve of trained 
pilots, the United States Naval and 
Marine Corjis are offering aviation train- 
ing to college graduates in a course of 
eight months' duration at the Naval Air 
.Station in Pensacola, Florida. 

In a circular distributed by the cfjni- 
manding officer of the l-irst Naval Dis- 
trict the reciuiremeiits fi>r adniissirm to 
the scluM»l are slated. Must be In'tween 
20 and '27 years of .tge and unmarried. 
After |>;issing the required physical ex- 
aminaiion I hey an* onlcntl to a Naval 
Resir\c Aviation Base for one months' 
flight training. U|)on the satisf.utory 
ioii)|iletion of this months' work they 



up|R-r( lassinen and iH'iIAt for freshnic-n. will In- sent to the N.iv.d Air Station, 
The new charges will l)e $HK) for students Pcns.i(ola, Moiid.i, for the (omplcte 
from the State and $221) ffir students from flying course. This course lasts eight 



W'ithf>ut the Stale 

liecaiise of the limited dormitory fa- 
cilities the Trustees wire again <om|Mlled 
to limit the enrollment of the next fresh- 
men class to thrte hundred. Not more 
than seventy-five of litis numlM-r m.'iy lie 
(Continued on Page 4, <>>lumn 4) 

"Relation of Christian 

to World" in Chapel 

Shfiwing the fallacies of the nuKlern 



are $l.f..j (K-r couple and may be sec urccl : and the an. ient |K)ints of view con. irning 
from .Maroon Kc v nienilK rs: Frank «he world and ni.in. Dr. lluKh Bla< k o( 



vcy 

Burke, Roger Blackburn, .Sheldon Bliss. 
John (-olenian, John Evans, Curtis 
Clark, Walter J<.hnson, SiUis Little, 
Roger Warner, and .Sulo T;mi. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Autumn to uinter. winter into spring 
Spring into summer, ^Mmmer into fall. — 
.So ro/h lire fhnniiin^ yur, and <,o ur change: 
Motion •.<) 'uifl. ue Icnin.- nut that ue mine. 

—I). M. I.ulo k—'ImmutaHe" 

Wednesday. January 25 

.'J.(H) 1) III. \ar.ity II'k key. .\niherst, here 
Thumday, January 2* 

12,.'J0 m. "V" l,<'i tiir<-, Draix-r Iliill 

7.(10 p.m. AKronomy < lub. KfKjm lit. 
Stcxktiridiic 
Friday, January 27 

7.0.) p.m. S> ial Ini'm 
Saturday. January 2H 

li.fX) p.m. \af-ity lloflc'-y. L nion at 
St h<-n<-< lady 

H.aO p m Varsity BaMkotball. New llamp- 
shir<- at IJurham 
Sunday. January 2* 

(»..K)a.m. Sunday (haric'l 

2..'iO p.m. Ditmssion Group 

:{(!<) p.m. Radio ( oncert. .Mpmorial ll.tll 
Monday. January -W ., 

h(|.)p.m. ., Iff (lilt). .Mfmorial Mall 
Tuesday. January .^1 

6.4.") p.m. l-aiiKiKiKf and Literature Talk. 
Stof ktjridKf 

7,(X) p.m. Orchestra Rehearsal 

7 4.1 p.m. Colleuian Competition 

K.iOpm. Campus crhorus. Memorial Hall 



nionlhs and consists of ap|)roxima1ely 
22.') hours of fly iiig as well as a course of 
study in avi.'ition engines, navigation, 
ra.lio, gunnery, .iiid .lerology, a thorough 
knowli'.lge of which is iic-t'<-ss;iry fcjr a 
Naval Aviator. 

(Continued on Page 4, Oilumn i) 

Living in Shack 

Told by Students 

Ainsworth and Crosby in Lane Home 

Of the many methods of reducing ex- 
IM-nses at this college, |jirha|)s none is so 
on "The- Ril.ition <»f a Christian to the- ' c. ononiic al and inlrigiiing as that iiseel f»y 
World" .It Sunday Cha|M-l, January !•>. two iip|Kr. lassinen, D.ivid Crosby '.'13 
A string cjuartet comjiosed of Kdward i and t.ordon Ainsworlh ".i4. These men 
Harv.y, fvlgar Sorton, Frank Bat stone, have Imc n "roughing it" in a shack on 
and R.ilj)h Henry playe.l iiisiruniental Lover's Lane th.it is unhealed, unlighted, 
musi. during the service. ; and unplumlxred. They do their own 

There was a famous ins<ri|)tion in /"«"•«<"»!. w.ishing, wcKjd-chopping, etc. 
Inilia, Dr. BKick said, which read, "The , R«fntly they added up their expense* 
world is like unto a bridge; i>ass over it 'and found that for $2.47 per week, in 
but make not your tlwelling thereon." i a'''''»'"" •" 'he privileges of a private 
This quotation seems to infer that the I '"■i"'"'. 'h'V ha»I Imcti getting Ijoard and 
wc<rld is an inn, ncjt a hfjini-; a plac-e to room. 

stay for an hour Ijefore one eemtiniies on j The shack, a three room, c lapboareled 
his way. The truth Ufliind this thought building, was originally erected by one, 
is not Christian, but Pagan. Paganism Angus, as a |)l;ice of refuge from his 



the I'riion Thecjiogical St-min.iry spoke 



from the time of Aristotle has always 
assumeel that the- worlel is hostile- te> man, 
that he has to struggle with what jKjwe-r 
he (wsscsses against natural enemies. 
.Mo<lern literature tencls to take- the siime 



marital troubles. Since the profK-rty was 
sold to the college, students have rented 
it from the college. Crosby moved in 
two years ago, anci Ainsworth joined him 
last year. Both are forestry students and 



view, as shown in the writings of lie n rand reg.ard thiscxfie ricncc as valuable training. 
Russell, who speaks c>f the loneliness of Pcrhaf)s the most attractive feature of 
humanity in the fac;e of hostile for.es. their life is the seclusion. They arc well 
Dr. Black saicl: "Darkness and chspair | over a mile from the campus and Crosby, 
arc utterly op|>osed to the ethics of who is a cross-country runner, has found 
(Contlaucd on Page .t, Column 5) (Continued on Pag« 4, Column 5) 



2 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25. 1933 



/Iba06acbu6^ 




CoUeQian 



srAF^ 



smr^c 



Official newspaper of the Massachusttts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

JOSBI-H POLITEULA 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1933 



EOGBNB CURALNIOC *33 



Alfrbda L. Ordway "33 
AssociaU Editor 



News Department 

Raymond Royal '34. Editor 
ALrMDA L. Ordway '33 
Ruth D. Campbkll '34 
Harristtb M. Jackson '34 
Maby L. Allem '36 
David L. Arsnbbrg 'So 
ELizABrrH K. Harrwgtoh 
Edith M. Parsons '36 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 
Editorial 

JOSI£>'H PollTELLA 



Athletka 

Theodori M. Lbary "SS 
Silas Littlk, Jr. '36 
Glbmn K. Shaw '35 



With all the socialibts, militarists, 
materialists, spiritualists, Republicans, 
and Democrats, we now have the Tech- 
nocrats. Just one big happy family, 
and nothing can be done about it. 
ss — ■ — 

After years and years and years. 
Colonial Inn has finally set up a new 
sign. W 



THE NATURALISTIC APPROACH 
TO TRUTH 

What Naturalism Is 

One of the most vital questions which 
faces a serious college student today is 
that of his attitude toward the philo 
ith" allthe birds South for the I sophical view denoted by the term 



'35 



Exchanitaa 

ALrRKDA L. Ordwat '33. aiuor 



Feature 
Stanley K. Sbpkrsm '34 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
Adt4rtisint Manottr 

Frank Batitonb '34 

W. Lawbbncb Schinck '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashlby B. Gorney '33 

BusiH4SS Managtr 



Buelneaa AaaUtanU 

John Wood "35 



Herbert Jenkins '34 
Circulation Managtr 

Nelson Stevens "35 
George Pease '3.5 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 

as soon as possible. . a ^„„ 
Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. ^ 



Entered aa aeoond-dai. matter at the Amherit Post Office. Accepted for malllns « .oeci 
Mwle orStld^for 1^ Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authoriied Augu.t 20. 1918. 



lal rate 



of postage prov: 



^ ^ 



^ •*» 



^ EDITORIALS ^ 

"WHOM THE GODS WOULD DESTROY ..." 

"Whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad." So runs the old adage, 
and if we take madness as a symptom of an early destruction and a consequent 
changing about in which advantage is taken of past mistakes, the premises of that 
truism are wtll applicable to the mad scramble for medical education that is peculiar 
to our present generation of college students. Our headlong rush to become phy- 
sicians surgeons, denli>ts, occulists, osteopaths, or to enter other specialized phases 
of medical science, has been so frenzied ami uncontrolled during the past thirty 
years that in the last two years alone, out of every ten graduates of the higher in- 
stitutions of learning, one had si«cialized in some phase of medicine. So unregulated, 
in spite of the severe restrictions which exist, has been the inllux of students into 
the medical schools, that in the United States today, there is one medical practitioner 
for every 780 of population, a proixjrtion twice as large as is found in the leading 
countries of Europe. With our characteristic democratic spirit, we have p»rmitted 
anyone, if he has shown such intellectual acuity as is necessary to grasp the princii)les 
and data of the fundamental sciences of physics, chemistry, and biology, and has 
demonstrated his ability to read and understand Latin, to prepare himself for the 
medical profession. The result has been that too many students possessing sufficient 
of this intellectual sharpness have been lured into the profession because of its ro- 
mantic, lucrative, and prestige-conferring nature. 

But many of the graduates of recent years, and this is worthy of consideration, 
have been disillusioned in their expectations, piirticularly insofar as financial returns 
from their occupation are concerned. They find that their income is not so com- 
fortable that it iK-rmiis early retirement; on the contrary, as more than fifty percent 
of the licensed practitioners found out even in the prosperous years of 1929. their 
gross income was $3,800 or less. Of those falling within this group, twenty-five per 
cent had incomes below $2,300. In short . the situation has become so threatening, the 
spirit of medical education so self-destroying in its overcrowded conditions, that 
during the past year a commission on American Medical Education prepared an 
exhaustive report of the con<litions among practitioners, and the medical and pre- 
medical schools. We consi<ler the report of the commission important not for its 
thoroughness of investigation, but for the new trends, the new attitudes in medical 
education which it emphasizes to alter the existing ruinous aimlessness. 

If we interpret the findings of the commission aright, it seems to us that the 
most sane, logical, and inspiring conclusion to which the investigators have arrived, 
is the idea that not anyone can enter the medical profession. In terms of our prevalent 

We have iK-en 



winter the sign has a chance to remain 
new for quite a while. 

ss 

Question in Military 51: "What is the 
temperature of a horse?" 

Answer: "Ninety from a hundred 

(90-100)." ss— 

On January 1, 1933, two sophomores 
found that they had a white elephant on 
their hands, a five dollar flivver and no 
registration. To free their frozen asset 
(frozen in more ways than one), they are 
going to form a syndicate antl sell bonds 
to raise the twenty odd dollars needed to 
register the $5.00 boiler. 

ss 

Not hockey but slush polo. . . Might as 
well he pla\ing hockey on a floating cake 
of ice. . . McGuckian's cap is the latest 
ino<lcl for goalies. . . How many remem- 
ber the Northeastern game of two years 
ago? . . . Although the Sigma Beta Chi's 
balloons and candy were for sale. Phi 
Sig's paddles were private proiK-rty and 
dedicated t;o si)ecial reform work. . . Long 
live Hell Wcck! ... The leather-lunged 
Connecticut rooter recalled old memories 
every time he yelled "Come on Aggie". . . 
He certainly held his own with our cheer- 
ing section which only cheered the good 
tackling of our team and every time they 
recovered a fumble. . . There must be a 
cellophane lid over the baskets every 
time our team shoots. . . Our cheer lead- 
ers and song director must be saving 
their cute little white sweaters for spring. 
For they do go nicely with white flannels. 
. . . Quite a racket. . . Peanuts, the sooth- 
ing call of ball parks and football stadi- 
ums, is invading the realm of basketball. 
The white jacket looks familiar. . . 
An<l didn't Dutchy get a hand! 

ss 

A state co-ed: Bare red legs, a skirt, 
a jacket, a daub of powder, a streak of 
lipstick, a butt, frowsy hair . . . some- 
times a book. 

ss 

A notice from the Middlebury Campus, 
"The course, entitled Romantic Revolt 
in European Literature, has been changed 
to Literary Criticism. The content of 
the course will be much the same, with 
an added emphasis on criticism." That 
is the way all revolts start. 

ss 

Wellesly girls have decided not to 
speak to one another when meeting on 
campus, saying that greeting the same 
person several times a day is tiresome. 
(Some do have big noses.) 

— ■ — ss 

For the benefit of those students who 

sliuiy (?) late, University of .■\labama 

held a series of dawn dances which ran 

On this campus even 



educational ideas, this is an astonishingly challenging statement, 
accustomed to think, with our emphasis ujwn quantity rather than quality, that it 
is of lasting tribute to a nation to have the privileges of higher education shared by from 6 to 8 a.m. 
everyone. Now. with such an exodus of Dolors of Medicine into our professional the diner closes as early ^s midnight, 
life eich year, with so many of them idle because of overcrowded conditions; with T^'7~~ . , , , . 

such a large number finding more lucrative outlets beyond the confines of their A neighlx.urinR high scho.,1 askecl the 
legitimate profe-sion; with so many helpless because of incom,H.tence; we are be- I Physical F^lucation department if it 
einnin« to re.d./e , that ,>erhaps it is not the frock that makes the friar, nor that a might play in the preliniinar.es at the 
Llical education makes the doctor. It must be sai.l. to the lasting credit of the | final night of the high sehool basketball 
investigators that they have rcalizecl that the healing art is a sacred art and should tournament. The authorities decided to , 
not be tauuln to unscrupulous men of m. character, who,e only interest in medicine | see the team m action to decide whether 
is in its social benefits. We take the recommen.lation of this commission that medical or not the high school was good enough 
students should be se'evterl acc.pling to such qualifications as character, personality, to play. So two members of our I hys. 
scholastic achievement, industry, general culture, and sincerity Ed. department drove to the town where 

scheduled to play that 



naturalism, and the critical method which 
is called the naturalistic. It is in the hope 
of helping some students, at least, to 
find an answer to this question that I 
offer th'> following observations. 

What is naturalism? To such a question 
any clear and concise answer is impossible, 
because so many confused and conflicting 
factors are involved. In theory, however, 
naturalism holds that every phenomenon 
of existence can be traced to some 
"natural" cause; that every aspect of 
human behavior, for example, has its 
origin in the physical world which we 
can contact with our senses; that, in the 
words of a scientist who professes also to 
be religious, "the entire man, body, mind, 
and soul, develops from a germ, and is 
the product of heredity and environment." 
You can see, of course, that such a view, 
if followed to its logical conclusion, leads 
to an absolutely mechanistic and fatal- 
istic view of the universe, in which free 
will does not exist, and in which there is 
no purpose and no meaning; that it leads 
eventually, as in behavioristic psychology, 
to the situation, which to anyone but a 
behaviorist would be an obvious absurdi- 
ty, of man's using his mind to deny that 
mind exists. It destroys, of course, the 
moral responsibility of the individual; for 
if all a man's actions can be traced to 
"natural" causes, to the malfunctioning 
of glands, to hereditary weaknesses, or to 
environmental influences (and I will 
grant that a strong, although in my 
opinion, a specious argument can be 
made out for such a view), then it is clear 
that the terms right and wrong have no 
meaning, and a person's actions become 
merely desirable or undesirable, according 
as they contribute to or detract from the 
physcal welfare of society. It denies, of 
necessity the reality of such a thing as 
conscience, or if it is honest enough to 
admit its existence, explains it as an in- 
herited instinct of what is best for the 
race. That is Matthew Arnold's explana- 
tion, and shows that even Arnold with 
all his admireable qualities, was at heart 
a naturalist. 

I have said that naturalism in theory, 
if honestly and logically developed, leads 
inevitably to determinism or fatalism. 
The hopeless inconsistency of the whole 
system may be seen from the fact that 
practically, it asserts that all human 
problems — scientific, social, and political 
— must be solved by the unaided human 
intellect, by the mere reasoning power of 
men as they are; although it holds that 
every intellect is the product of "natural" 
causes; that is, ultimately, of physico- 
chemical reactions. 

Naturalism in Religion 

So much for naturalism in general. 

Now let me say something about the 

naturalistic method in criticism, not only 

in literature, but in the field in which its 



followed in almost all college courses in 
the history, the philosophy, or the p>y. 
chology of religion. It is also the method 
which seems to be dominant in most of 
our theological seminaries, a fact which 
goes a long way, i>erhaps, toward giving 
one an understanding of most of the per- 
sons who come out of them. It is a 
method whose primary tendency may be 
indicated by saying that it is not int.r- 
ested in values, but only in facts; not in 
the validity, the truth, of a certain re- 
ligioiis teaching, but only in a rationahsUc 
explanation of how that teaching came 
into existence. 

In its approach to Christianity, for 
example, it does not concern itself with 
the valtte of the teachings of Jesus of 
Nazareth, and it neglects his chalk iiye 
"He that will do His will (that is. the 
will of God) shall know of the doctrine, 
whether it be from God or whethn 1 
speak of myself"; and assuming that He 
did speak only of himself, that He -dns 
a deluded idealist, it undertakes to ex- 
plain how He got that way. It points cut 
passages in the Old Testament, chiefly 
in the Psalms and the Prophets, wliich 
contain ideas similar to those in the 
Gospels; it professes to find the souro or 
the explanation of every one of iiis 
teachings. One writer says, for inst;inn , 
that His command to resist not evil <ind 
to turn the other cheek was spoken dm ing 
the early years of His ministry, just ilter 
He had Ixen in contact with some pai Itist 
set; and that the apparently (although I 
think not really) contradictory statemmt, 
"I came not to bring peace, but a sword!" 
was the result of His having been an^;ered 
by opposition, and of His having ((nmd 
that pacifism was not practical! And 
these naturalistic critics go on to talk 
about complexes, and to cite cases of 
other men who have thought themselves 
to be the chosen instruments of God. And 
likewise, when they come to St. Pau! 
they take his life to pieces and psycho- 
analyze it in an absolutely ruthless 
manner. And when they get through, one 
knows exactly how Paul came to think 
that his vision on the Damascus road was 
real, and one knows that it was no more 
supernatural than having a bad dream 
after eating too much mince pie. And 
so with St. Augustine and St. Francis 
and Martin Luther and all the rest; all 
their actions and all their teachin^;> m 
(Continued on Pag* 3, Column 3) 



SPORTS 



•*• 



ockey Six Ties Williams 
Loses to New Hampshire 



WLDCAT TEAM 

SCORES TWICE 



Poor ice handicapped the efforts of 
^„th I cams in the game with New Hamp- 
khiri which was played under weather 
[ondiiions more suitable for baseball 
[hail hockey. New Hampshire accumu- 
lited two goals before the State sextet 
wan to fune-tion, but the second Wildcat 
^oal was followed two minutes later by 
In iin issisted goal by Snow. 

St.iif once again dominated the play 
ki tilt last jxirioel, swarmed all around 
[he- Wildcat net, but Goalie Congdon of 
|he New Hampshire team was too alert. 
made several miraculous saves which 
protected the Wildcat lead to the last. 
flic work of A. Brown, Cain and Captain 
l.inimond for State was outstanding. 

Till- lineup: 
I . ..f N. H. 

111!' . AiiKwin. Iw 
ro. ,.it. I'attriclge, c 
,-n\. Howler. Abtie, rw 
, h'.U.r. McUermott, If 

luw.ik. rf 



Maas. State 

rw, \V. Brown, Corioran 
c. Snow, Cain 
Iw. Henry, Ilainniunel 
rd, A. Brown 
Id. Blackburn 
g. McGuckian 
^y;^.-llxewr Hannwhire 2, Mass. State 1. 
Kir<t iK-riod: New Hampshire, BachcUor (un- 

t^iuiij jleiriod: New Hampshire. Wliite (un- 
>i5tH). 10.37; Mass. Suie, Snow (unassisted), 

j<^,f,.fe^ — Oowd. Time — 10-minute periods. 



f Stocl^bri^0e | 

Professor Robert P. Holdsworth of the 
Forestry department will speak on "The 
Farm Forests in Sweelen," on ThurMlav. 
January 26, 1933, at 7 p.m. in Room lU 
Stockbridge Hall. All interested ars 
welcome. 



IROIIAJS AND CRISEYDE" IS 

SUBJECT OF PROF. PRINCE 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

.;iiiil 1.1 the two lovers any recognition. 
lie -t.iry as he tells it is however, tmly 
niileiital and episodic to his history of 
rii\. Boaeraeeio, writing his "II Filo- 
r.ito" puts the story in the form wliich 
haii'LT used. Through "II Filostrato" 
liM(.ii(io tidel his own love story elis- 
jiMcl IS that of Troilus and Criseyele. 
vidtiiily Chaucer derived the plan of 
1- i-oein from the Italian writer, but 
III lii> treatment of the famous legend 
|pui much geniality and humor which 
1 I ilobtrato" lacked. 

A Sottish poet, Henryson, a fpw 

I iilc after Chaucer, rewrote the story 

1 i.illed it "The Treatment of Cri- 

ydc." Hf did not like Chaucer's ending 

th( h^cnd so he changed it. Shakes- 



CAIN FEATURES 

STATE OFFENSE 

Massachusetts State's varsity puckmen 
engaged in two contests during the past 
week which resulted in a 2-2 tie with the 
Royal Purple of Williams anel a 2-1 loss 
at the hands of the Univ. of N. H. Wild- 
cats. The tie with the Williams team 
coulel not he settled as elarkness pre- 
vented the- playing of any overtime 
periexl. 

Fast, hard playing fe-atured the entire 
game with Williams. Several difiicult 
saves by Goalie McGuckian prevcnteel 
any score by Williams in the first (Krioel, 
and a tally by Hammond on the rebound 
of Snow's shot put State on even terms 
with Williams midway in the last [)eriod. 

State doniinateel the play, thereafter, 
but all of their efforts to count the winning 
tally before time and darkness haheel the 
play were of no avail. The entire State 
te-am played well on the defense, esixjcially 
Ca|)tain Hammond, Cain and Art Brown. 

The lineup: 

Mas*. State Williams 

W. Brown, Henry, Iw rw, Horton 

t'uin, Snow, c c, Johnson, Williams 

Haminund. Wihry, Corcoran, rw Iw, Steele 

A. Brown. Id rd. Lisle, Blackburn 

Hainmonil. rd Id, Rogers 

.McGuckian, g g, Webb, Chapman 

Store — -Mass. State 2, Williams 2. 

Second ix-riod — Johnson, Steele, 0.41; A. Brown 
(unassisted). H.U; Kgln-rt (l.isle), l-Lri.'!. 

Third jH-riod — Hainnioiid (Snow). 6.10. 

Referee — Morrissey. Time — one 20 and two 
lo-iiiinute pciiods. 



ixare, in his play "Troilus and Cressidas' 
burlestjued the stfjry of these two lover. 
dealing with it in a manner entirely dilTtr- 
ent from Cliaueer. Why Shakes|Hare' 
burlesejueel the legenel is a [R-rplexing 
problem to Shakespearean st holars. The 
latest version of the tale is the recent 
mexlerniziUion by George Phillip Krapp 
which was published last year. 

Frejiii this ve-rsion Professor Piiiice- read 
many extracts illustrating the modernism 
of Chaucer and how well Krapp in his 
mtxierni/iition caught the sjnrit of the 
great pex;t. Krapp wrote a jjoem to the 
ste)ry in the true Chaucerian style in 
which he explaineel his reasons for re- 
writing "Troilus anel Criseytle" and in 



floticce 



^ 



INFIRMARY PATIENTS 

Infirmary patients this week itui 
the following: Eugene Guralnick ':- 
Silas Little, Jr. '35, Roger Allen > 
and Thornton Proctor S'33. To 'i 
there have been just 74 cases of tlu 
campus. 

OLD INDEXES 
a limited number of 1935 
in Mr. Ranel's ufficfl 



— Try — 

THE YELLOW DIAMOND 

Prices Reasonable No Cover Charge We Satisfy 

Phone 632-W— Amherst, Mass.— 7 Northampton Rd. 



THE NEW PARKER VACUUM FILLER PEN 

Ir. Parker, creator of famous Parker Duofold Pens, believes this new marvel is as 
great an advance in pens as Free Wheeling and F"our Wheel Brakes are to 
Automobiles.— SEE THE NEW "PARKER" 



. J, Hastings 



NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



Amherst, Mass. 



There are 
and 1932 Indexes 



trend and nature is most apparent, i.^.^,,^ ^^^^ ,^. ^^^^^,^^^^^1 j^t the price o1 



namely, that of religion. Here it is more 
frequently calleel, at least in its most 
common as[)ec., the anthropoleigical 
method. This is the method which is 



was scnceiuieei to 

It was a night of icy roads, the 

car had no chains, so that much pushing 

was necessary, especially up the hills. 

On arriving they found the hall elark and 



intelleertual ability, . . , • t.. < . 

of purpose, as the harbingers of a new era in the history of meelical education. We j the team 

feel that this program, if carried out with sufficient thoroughness and consieieration : night '* 

for the welfare of the stu.lents, as well as the public at large, would eliminate all 

those students who have not these epudifications for entering the field. We would 

have our Doctors of Meelicine only men of exceptional interest and ability in that 

branch of study. 

Encouraging, too, is the thought that medicine, as a science of progressive 
specialization, has reached the end of its orthogenetic path, anel is advised to begin 
now on a different scale. In this branch of the science, again, a change must be 
affected to avert self-destruction. What has been most eleplorable, particularly from 
the standpoint of education in pre-medical institutions, is the rigiel emphasis upon 
preparatiem in the basic sciences, to the extent that the mind of the student l)ecomes 
a storehouse of chemical and biological facts. Every course in the curriculum is 
offered for its utility to the student in his chosen occupation— a point of view which 
has its exponents on this campus, as well as others. In these cases, the emphasis is 
placed upon the industrial or socializeel phases of medicine; the philosophy of the 
meeiicalseiences is unknown. If the pre-medical eelucation is preparation for speciali- 

ration, medical education is narrow, dogmaeic, s^K>cializ.ltion itself. The subjects are at Washington University 
taught in such overwhelming detail and with such sp)eed, that the commission feels 
that the intellectual development of meelical students cannot keep pace wich such a 



ERRAT A 



$L0O each. 

UNDERGRAD. MATH 

The unelcrgraduate 



had been caneelled 



empty. The game 
four weeks ago\ 

ss 

The famous "gumwood" furniture of 
the University of Texas has been ma- 
liciously destroyed. Ten thousand (10,000) 
wads of gum were removed from the 
classroom furniture recently. 

One of the many collegiate rackets — 
fraternity pins are being rented to un- 
attached co-eds by a Female Aid Society 



The Collegian wishes to correct a mis- 
taken impression, to the effect that Dr. 
Paul Serex of the Department of Chem- 
istry was rescued from hydrogen sulfide 
fumes by Z. J. Jackimczik '35, which 
appeared in our issue of January 18. The 
sentence in question, api)earing in the 
article "Jackimczik Saves Graduate 
Assistant," should read, in its corrected 
form: "As \c was necessary that the 
Chem. 25 class should use the hydrogen 
sulfide for an exjx^riment during the 
period. Dr. Serex' graduate assistant went 
into the room where the generator was 
stationed to repair it." 



-ss- 



"breathless. hurried, i>ressing schedule." Our system of specialization, the counter- 
part of the sterile cut anel elried scheme of division of labor in industry, has gone so | sessions. 

(Continual on P.a. 4) not hibernate. 



Not only spring football practice but 
at Bowdoin they are having winter 



The names of the following students 

should have apjxared in the list of the 

Dean's third honor group: L. Winokur, 

Seems like the Polar Bears do j 1935; Miss F. S. Bilsky and C. S. Hannum, 

1936. 



SEMINAR 

Mat hematics I 
Se-minar arranged by Prof. Moore hcl^l 
its first session in the Mathematics bui!i.| 
ing on Wednesday evening, January 1^1 
Mr. George Aldrich '33 spoke on 'Nof| 
Interpolating Logarithmic Tables." 

POULTRY JUDGING CONTKST 

Massachusetts State College is ^ 
represented by R. R. Stockbriei^e - 
S. A. Arnold '35, R. M. Koch '3'.. i- 
H. F. Riseman '35 at the sixteenth .^nr- 
Eastern Intercollegiate Poultry Jii^i--^ 
Contest to be held Wednesday, J 'n'- 
25, 1933 at Trenton, N. J., according 
information from the Poultry departin' 

The other states that will be re; 
sented in the contest are New Hanp^' ■ 
New York, New Jersey, Connecticut .' 
North Carolina. New Hampfhif', 
entering a team for the first tini' ■ 
headquarters of the Massachusetts ^ 
team will be at the Hotel Hildebrech 
Trenton. The group will be accon T '■ 
by Professor Luther Banta of the Pi - 
department. 



lOOO WHITE ENVELOPES 

STUDIO VELLUM 

at 
50c for 100 

liss Cutler's Gift Shop 



8. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

OculisU' IreKfiptlons liUed. Broken lenaet 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALAR.M CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

3 PLEASArO" STREET, (up one fllfthf ) 

IDA M. BRIDGEMAN 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 
of Music 

TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst, Mass. 



SLOO BLUE RIBBON AND STAR BOOKS $1.00 

A VERY LARGE ASSORTMENT TO CHOOSE FROM 



'\n RK OF THE WORLD AND OF MAN 

Kdited by H. H. Newman 
■"ft copies were sold at the $4.00 price 

L>l W WORLD OF PHYSICAL DISCOVERY 

By Floyd Darrow 

MARKS OF AN EDUCATED MAN 

By .\. E. Wiggam 

HLMANITY UPROOTED 

By Maurice Hindus 



LIVES OF A BEN(;AL LANCER 

By F. Yeat»-Brown 

100 WORLD'S BEST .NOVELS Condensed 

STALIN by LEVINE 

STANDARD BfXJK OF BRITISH 
AND A.MERICAN VERSE 

CARL AKELEVS AFRICA 

SHAKESPEARE'S COMPLETE WORKS 




JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Wedneatduy, January 2S 

\'.irsity Hotkey Airtliorst. hero 

K.30 p.m. SiKina I'hi Kpsilon vs. Theta Chi, 

Volleyball. Ba8k<ll)aU 
9 1.') |).iii. I'lii SJKMia Kapi)a vs. Kuppa 
Kpsiloii. \olU-yb.ill, Baski'tliall 
Thuntduy, January ih 

8.3ei p.m. Alpha SiKina I'hi vs. Alpha 

Gamma Rhu, X'ullfyball. Kasketball 
9. 1.' p.m. Kappa Sinma vs. Nun-Fraternity, 
\olUyl,all. Basketball 
Friday, January 27 

Fro.sh Basketball at Turners Falls 

tJT.V. vs. Non- Fraternity, X'olleyball, 

Ba.ski-lball (alter Soiial I'nion) 
K. of C. Track Mii-t at Boston 
Saturday, January 28 

7 p.m. \arsity Basketball. New Hampshitv 

at Durham 
Varsity Hotkey: Union at Schenectady 
Tuesday, January 31 

H.l,') p.m. Varsity Basketball: Springlield 
ut SpriiiKlielil 
Wednesday, February I 

X'arsity Hot-key: Northeastern at Boston 



4- 
4- 



^bru the "knot l3olc 



^ 
^ 



This columnist says: .State is five 
[Hiints In-tttr than New Hampshire — 
and the M.troon will t.ikc the Maroon 
and White by five baskets. We arc sorry 
we were mistaken about the Connecticut 
A^Rie K'Tiic. hut after all, we did not 
think that plundiers were allowed to 
work on Sat unlay nights in Amherst. 

K.ippa Epsilun defeated Lambda Chi 
Alpha, 15-9 and 15-12 in volleyball and 
22-11 in basket bill. Si^ma Phi Epsilon 
defeated Q.T.V. two out of three panics 
in volleyball but lost to the Qutes in 
basketball, 10-7. Phi Si^ma Kap|)a 
contiuered Alpha Sij^ma I'hi in volleyball 
15-6 and 15-10, and in basketball, 21-8. 
Delia Phi Alpha triumphed over Theta 
Chi two straight g.imes in volleyball and 
won 14-9 in basketball. LamlMla Chi 
Al|)ha won two jjamcs out of three from 
Alpha (ianuna Rho in volleyball and 
were successful in basketball, 1(5-4. 



whi< h he praises the briadth, s;mil\, and 
|xjwer of the |)oet. 

Concerning the tragic con( lusion of the 
|XKin, Professor Piin»e said: "It dixs not 
leave one with a sense of irreparable loss 
like the ^reat tragedies such as "Hamlet." 
Hut rather it leavts one with an iinder- 
stan<linK of and a sympathy with life. 
Chaucer wrote into this ending; the 
philosophy of the serene Catholii spirit." 



AGORA 
(Contlnuad from Pag« 2) 

explained perfectly in a "reasonable" and 
"scientific "manner. 

Naturalism in Literary Criticism 

And this is the method of almost all 
historians, biographers, and literary 
critics totlay. I At us consider for a 
moment the typical present-day attitude 
toward two of the great English authors 
of the nineteenth century. Carlyle's 
metaphysics, it is said, is the result of 
his misinterpretation of the (krman 
Transcendentalists; his lack of sympathy 
with the lower classes was due to his own 
humble birth, which, it is alleged, was 
a source of humiliation to him. His 
general jK-ssinn'sm was caused by the 
fact that he suffered from dys(K'psia. 
And so <A Ruskin: every characteristic of 
his work is explaiiieil as the result of his 
secluded childhoorl, his ill-health, his 
disai)iK»intmen( in love, or some other 
"natural" cause-. 

.Now, what is the tacit assumption 
an<l the im[)lir it conclusion in all sut h 
pnxecdings as the^c? Simply this: that 
there is no such thing as truth. Some of 
the teachings of Jesus are to found in the 
Old Testament, and in other s<ri|)tures 
as well. Therefore, thes<; teachings are 
not true. It was natural that a man 
should l)e deluded into thinking (hat he 
was the Messiah, therefore, Christ was 
deluded. Other men have had visions 
like that of Paul. Therefore there has 
Ix-en no reality either in his or theirs. 
; Carlyle based his metaphysical views on 
a misunderstanding of German trans- 
cendentalism. Therefore, they are fahe. 
Ruskin's writings were influenced by his 
Ivoe affairs. Therefore, they have no 
value. In a word, the attitude of the 
naturalistic critic is this: of every jjerson 



LANGROCK CLOTHES 

Men of assured taste-gentlemen, reriuirecUithing of excellent quality, exclusive 
patterns, hand tailored and custom tiualiiy. Langrock Clothes are selected by 
such discriminating men in ever increasing numliers. 



EUertmen Split Even 

New Hampshire Next 



WILLIAMS REPELS 
MAROON and WHITE FIVE 



Coach Freddy Lllert's Massiichusettb 
State Collt-ge basketters split tven against 
two collegiate rivals last week, losing to 
a strong Williams five, in a hard-fought 
high-scoring contest, 52-4C, and defeating 
a rather meditKre Connecticut Aggie 
quintet, in a dull, listless game, 22-10. 
Ca|>tain Ciordon Hotiran, Bush, and Lojko 
scored twelve points apiece lo feature the 
Manx)n and White attack against Wil- 
liams while Bush's work was the only 
semblance of gtMxl basketball in State's 
raggoti play against Connecticut Aggies. 

The lineup: 



N.iviiiH.U 

Kroll.rf 

O'Donnell.rf 

Swann.c 

Flint .c 

Shci-han.lb 

Shacta.lb 

Markoski.rb 



Wlllldina 

H. F. I'. 

4 4 12 

6 4 10 


2 4 

1 2 

2 4 K 
U O (I 
4 2 10 

19 4 52 



MuHS. .Stale 
B. 

FriKard.ib 

NaH.Hif,il) 

llouran.lb 

Coburn.lb 

Fawiett.c 

Sievers.c 

Busli.rf 

Lojko.lf 




2 

H 
o 

2 

2 
4 



l.'i 10 40 



After playing a brilliant brand of 
basketball in its fir.st four games, the 
State College hoop (piintet was consider- 
ably ofT form in the Connecticut Aggie 
contest. But although it presented a 
miserable exhibition of court work tht- 
Maroon and White five was able to turn 
b;»ck t he scoring t hreat of I he Nul meggers, 
winning 22-19. The play during the first 
half was very ragged on the |)art of Inrth 
teams but Bush and Lojko scored enongli 
ixjints to give Stale a 11-9 lead. 

The lineup: 



Mass. Slate 

B. F. v. 



I/)jkn,lf 

Shrfl.lf 

Bush.rf 

Hanson, rf 

Faw<ett,c 

Sievers.c 

Houran.lg 

Nassif.lK 

FtiganLrg 



2 
O 
2 

1 




1 

2 



7 8 23 



CJonnecticut 

B. F. 1'. 

<;<>l"l.r« O 1 1 

l><>naliii<-,rK O O 

( alamaii.rii O O (I 

Leviti>w,l|| 1 2 4 

Standi8h.c 1 t 3 

Calamari.rf 1 2 

Skliskas.rf 1 :» fi 

Lipman.lf 10 2 

Donahiie.lf U 

S 9 19 



who has ever done or said anything out 
of the ordinary, anything that a normal, 
average human iK-ing would not do or 
say- in other words, anything that has 
ever been at all worth while — they ask 
this question: "What was wrong with 
him that he did or s^iid this thing?" 

It is inconceivable that a philosophy 
and a metho<l which are inevitably so 
partial, obviously .so irrational and un- 
scientific, anti evidently s«j liable to 
prejudice as tjie naturalistic, should ever 
be acce[)tcd by a serious and intelligent 
student of literature or life. 

Ellsworth liarnard 



WILDCAT HOOPMEN 

HAVE FAIR RECORD 



After a week's rest, the Ma.ssichusetts 
.Slate hoopmen will play two contests 
away from home next week, meeting 
New ll.impshire at Diuham on January 
28 and il.iying Springfit Id College at 
.Springtuld on January .'U. 

Coach Klli-rt's Iwsketcers are expecting 
ruggtti opiMisition from the New Hamp- 
shire <|uintet for I hey recall the close 
g.ime in which .i su|Krior New ll.impshire 
te.im lost lo Slate- in Andierst last year, 
2.1-21. Coach Henry Swasey of the New 
ll.impshire te.im has two combin.it ions 
of pl.iyers wh/t li In- uses alic-Mi.itc-ly in 
the contests. Bruce Kcxhier and (kne 
(■ormley, IcIUiiiien have- been be.iring 
the brunt of the forw.iitl work, while Al 
Armstrong, another letterm an, and Walk- 
ker, a sophomore, have l)ec n t.iking care 
of the delensive |M>sitioiis. Tr/.iioski is 
regular center and Howie Wilson, New 
Ilampsliire fcHMlKill star, has Inen playing 
a stellar g.ime at forward. 

.S|>iingfic-Id Ccdlege has a very strong 
basketball team this year and has In-en 
enjoying a successful season. Springfield 
is dclermined to make- a grcal i-fToit to 
ilefi-al State and avenge fen the- lirking 
which the KUertnien administered to the 



llickoxmen last year, ;in-25. 



Red' 



(juirk is the- captain of this year's Spring- 
field five. (Juirk is an aggressive and a 
capable leader .ind a very cle|.endable 
guard. Clarence Wc-lls, the team's had- 
ing sctmr, and Parks are the starting 
forwards. R.md.ill is at center while 
le.iniing up with (Juirk in the bac kccnirt 
is Morris, a sophomore, a colciied lx>y 
from Ohio. 



"RKLATION OF CHRISTIAN 

TO WORLD" IN CIIAPKL 
(Continued from Page I) 

Jesus. We can trust the world; we can 
trust life; we can trust (;<»d, for the world 
is (k)d's." 

Dr. Black insisted that there is a world, 
the c-neniy of man, that of which Words- 
worth s|K-aks in his sonnc-t, "The world 
is tcMj much with us." "Moderns are so 
desperately iins<:ienlific," Hr. Black con- 
tiniie-d. "Wc- are a part of nature. We 
are not only in the world, we are of the 
world. By all that Jesus was, by all that 
he said, by all that he did, he told us 
that this is (kkI's woild, ,-iiic| that we 
should not fear." 



CLEARANCE SALE 

Reducefl prices on all Suits, Topt oats an<I Overcoats 



wool. ZII'I'KK COATS 
COFUJUROY TkOLSKRS 



.Now $.'{.7 5 



Now S 2 . 1 r, 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



MEN'S GYM and BASKETBALI. SHOES 
MEN'S and WOMEN'S GYM SIIOE.S 

MEN'S $1.00 10 $1.35 WOMK.NS .85 lo $1.10 

MEN'S BASKKTBALL SHOES 
$1.25 $1.98 $2.65 $3.50 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



E. M. SWITZER JR., Inc. 



Price . . . $3.').00 and up 





THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1933 



SPAILDING ATHLETIC GOODS 

W'c AW tin- aiithori/id .ikiiii- lur A. C. Spaiildin;^ vV IJro-. Our athletic (Icpartincnt is 
cai)aljk' of serving yuu promptly with any athletic etiuipinent you may desire. 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



KDITOKIAIS 
(Continued from P»g« 3) 

pr .xjiii time (here is a 3|ie>.i ilist in the medical profession for every 



TRCIINOCRACV HAS (iOOl) 

OBJKCriVKS SAYS I>R. CANCE 
(Continued from Page I) 



classic (irainu with Ben (irtct's conipan>, Covdiior Justiili B. Ely and Pn M(!,„, 
well known on lliis canipns. in which she | Hush Baker attended the meeting; of th( 
pla>ed in London for many years. She I.(jii>lat lire as niemlHTs ex-officiu 4 t(, 
first came to Ameri< a when Uaniel Board ot TniMees. 



far that at tlie 

or^-an in the hody, excejit for llie body itself. It is strange to think that the doctor, ;,r,. emjilo^ing only one half the nunil)er j.-^,jj,n,.^„ j^rouuht the Mn^ilish production - ■ 

who corner into com act wiiti eviry phase of human activity, from abslrait thouuht to on the payroll as compared to l*"^- 1 „f "Everyman" to New York, and made AVIATION TRAINING 



inj> the very rapid displacement of men 

by machines, and pointing out the human [^^\^ atMillbrook, New York 



mecl.inical res|)onse, should be so little ver^d in fields outside of medicine. But all |\ w, r men were euKagcd in agriculture 
these, of course, are the natural outcome of our stress u|K)n specialization. in lo.io than in I'.ttM). Meantinte prmluc- 

h would seem to us that the inlliience of the observations of the commission x'um had increa^e<l nearly sixty jxrcent. 
should be a vital factor in readjusting present (onditions, and aid in controlling the Many exaggerated statements have been 
precipitate onrush of students without definite prescril)ed qualifications into a medical ! piade in the name of technocracy, show- 
carcer. The laxity with whii h we have permitted almost anyone to enter this field, 
in term» of tht- overcrowding and the lowering of ([uality standards of service, has 
been an almost fatal negligence. It is in profiting by the information brought out by 
the commission that our hoiHi of rising out of this deplorable situation now existent 
lies. We cannot but agree with the recommendations of the investigators: "Attention 
in the selection of students should be given to evidence of a grasp of the principles 
and philosophy of the scientific methwl, rather than to the amount and division of 
time spent in individual subjects. . . Pre-medical education should be general, not 
professional etlucation. A sound general training is of more value as a preparation 
for the study of medicine than a narrow, technical training limited largely to the 
pre-medical sciences." 



a short tour of the country. After |)lay- 
ing a numU'r of im|Kirtant roles on 



\I1.N 



EDITORIAL MISCELLANEA 

The Collegian is pleased to jirint "The Naturalistic Ajjproach to Truth" in today's 
Agoia column. The woik is an excerpt from Mr. Barnard's "Criticism of Literature 
and Life," which was delivered Ixfore the first meeting of this season's Department 
of Language and Literature discussions. 

In his treatment of the subject, the writer brings out the inconsistencies and the 
illogicalities of the naturalistic method as an approach to truth, and shows the effects 
of its sjxjcious reasoning ujion the study of the humanities, which it heis permeated 
in contemporary scholarship. We present the excerpt to our readers with the hope 
that it will provide material for thinking and consideration. 



"The most ama/ing thing I find in America," states an African attending Loyola 
College, New Orleans, "is the terrible English which even intelligent Americans 
speak. We in South Africa cannot understand that. We have American, English 
and German talkies in Port Eiizafx'th, my home town, and we prefer the English 
and German cinemas simply because the American actors and actresses are im- 
possible to understand. We invariably lose the trend of the dialogue." 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

"Let Dave do W' 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



SKI TOGS AND 

SKATING TOGS for 

STATK COLLEGE 

MEN and WOMEN! 

COLODNY 

CLOTHING 

CO. 

32 MAIN ST. 

i\carJ)cpot) 

NORTHAMPTON, 
MASS. 

We stock full line of Ladies 

Ski Pants, Jackets, Ski Boots 

and Riding Habits. 

(Free Oarfare on Purchases 
of $5.00 or oven 



misery this displacement entails. Mr. . 
Scott predicts an unemployed horde of 
20,0()(),(KX) by April l!t;{4 unless a major 
change is made in our economic order. 

One of these changes is the substitution 
of energy money for our present currenc> . 
Technocracy says that the price system, 
based on the value of a certain weight of 
gold, is positively doomed. Industry is 
now at a stand still because there is no 
balance iR-tween production and con- 
sumption. With a physical and technical 
plant sufficient to provide a living stand- 
ard ten times as high as that which we 
enjoyed in 1928, on an operating basis of 
GGO hours a year, we suffer declining in- 
comes, decreasing iwwer to buy goods, 
increasing doles for charity; in short we 
starve in the midst of plenty. This, Scott 
says, can he corrected only by smashing 
the price system. The value of a good 
equals the number of units of energy 
used up in its production. Scott sjwaks 
of mechanical energy. Logically he would 
include human energy. Since the erg in 
unchanging values would always be 
stable. Since |)eople would l)e provided 
with erg purchasing power just equal to 
the energy exj)ended in the produced 
goo<ls, consumption and production would 
exactly balance. 

Another necessary consequence of the 
present economic regime is the rapid 
accumulation of debt. Debt, says Scott, 
increases faster than production; the 
United States is now burdene<l with a 
debt of more than 200 billion dollars, 
practically equal to all of our present 
wealth. Under our social set-up, j)rogress 
is based on the extension of debt. We 
have now reached a i)oint where the 
entire order is aljout to break down. 

Within the limits of this pajRT it is 
not possible to answer these statements. 
Since technocracy holds the social scien- 
tists in contemirt, and the engineering 
societies repudiate technocracy, (lerhaps 
rejoinder is futile. This I can say, the 
cult has good objectives. It has caught 
the attention of the |)eople. It has 
emjjhasizetl some glaring weaknesses in 
our present social organization. It has 
j called the attention of phvsical scienti>ts 

THE NAiioNAi SHOE ffipAiRiNG ;:r«r:^:.r.:'.r"""''"^^^^^ 

14 MAIN STREET I A. h. Came 

^Uetween Town Hall and Ma.sonic Buildlnft 

$2.25 
1.50 

MKN'S Rl liBER HEELS .40 

1.25 
.30 
.25 



OFKKREI) COLLKC;! 
(Continued from Pufte I) 

Broadway, Miss Matthison retired from Students who successfully complttc ih^ 
the active J )rofessional theatre to conduct ! course at Pensacola are designatw] 
with her husband, Charles Rami Kennedy, "Naval Aviators" and are i omniis^ionKi 
the Bennett School of l.ilxral and Ap|)lied as ensigns in the U. S. Naval Reserve or 

second Lieut»naiits in the Marine Corjij 
Reserve, anil may lie ordered to on« 
years' active duty with the Aircraft 



Miss Matthison's roles have included 
the Antigone of Sophocles, and Euripides' 

Medea, Hlectra, Admetus in "Aliestis," Squadrons of the fleet or with the Marirse 

Phaedra in "lli|)iMjhtus," and the Mecuba Corps Ex|H<litioiiary Forces at Quuitico 

of "The Trojan Women." In view of the Virginia, or Sim Diego, California. During 

present efforts to secure the peace of the this year they receive the pay and allow- 

world, she rei)eated "The Trojan Women" anoes of their rank. 



last year, having given it previously 
some three seasons before. Iler unswerv- 
ing devotion to the very highest in art, 
her refusal ever to ajipear in anything 
else, have made for her a unique place in 
the spiritual and creative influences of 
the present time. 



FISHER'S 

YARDLEY'S 

Compacts 
Toilet Water 
Dusting Powder 
Face I'owder 
Talcum Powder 
Complexit)n Cream 
Bath Salts 



INCREASE OF TUITION 

VOTED BY TRUSTEES 
(ContlniMd from Paft* 1) 

women. The Trustees also voted to 
limit the number of out-of-state students 
who may enter to five [M-rcent of each 
class. This action was taken Ix-cause of 
complaints that Massachusetts stu<lents 
were not admitte<I and that out-of-state 
students were because they paid a higher 
tuition. 

Because many students would be com- 
pelled to leave school owing to the in- 
creased tuition, the Trustees voted to 
ask the Legislature for a ten thousand 
dollar aid fund. This sum is to be used 
to aid needy and deserving students. A 
committee of the Trusteis re|x>rted that 
a bill providing for the erection of two 
dormitories at a cost of J35(),0(X) had 
been introduced into the Legislature. 
The bill is being aided through the House 
of Representatives by the committte. 



Any seniors who are interested in trj- 
ing for the course may obtain more dt. 
tailed information and application hlanb 
by writing to Lieutenant F. L. Baker, 
U. S. Naval Reserve Aviation Base, 
Squantum, Mass. 

LIVING IN SHACK 

TOLD BY STUDFATS 
(Continued from Paft* I) 

that by listening for the 8:20 Ixll, th(\ 
can just make their first classes by hard 
running. 

Water is secured from a well and a 5to« 
keeps them busy hunting for wood, in 
the fall they "forage for apples and nuts 
in the orchards and wo(m1s; in the wim<T 
the i)rogram is snow, mud, rain, and 
sleep; in the spring it is chasing co«t 
away from the house." 

Beautiful as their place in the woods:: 
in spring and fall, winter makes themgiit 
their teeth. Potatoes have to be Ixiiled 
fifteen minutes to be thawed and ihey 
often study late to keep the fire biirninj. 
Another disadvantage is that in tht 
hunting season they are busy dodging 
bulkts. The greatest trouble ronics in 
the springtime, with the many dis- 
turbances by those for whom the Lant 
is named. 



MEN'S WHOLE SOLES and 

RUBBER HEELS 

MKN'S HALF SOLES and 

RLBitKR HEELS 



LADIES' HALF SOLES and 

RLBHER HEELS 

LADHS' RUBBER HEELS 
LADIES' LEATHKR HEKLS 

All Work Guaranteed 



Everything in Hardware 






and Radio Equipment 



=PHILCO= 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



EDITH WYNNE MATTHISON 

j TO APPEAR ON FRIDAY 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

".As You Like It," 'llaml.t," "Madieth," 
j "Romeo ami Juliet," "Much Ado Alnjut 
Nothini;," the Marina story from "Peri- 
cles." and "Midsummer Night's nroam." 
I \ chair in her name, as an American 
! Shakes|H'arian actress, has 1m en dedicated 
to Miss Matthisfin in the new Memorial 
Theatre at .Straifor<l-on-.\von. Of this, I 
Miss Matthison, FInglish-born, though 
now an .\merican ciii/.en, is partii'ularly 
proud. 

Miss M:itihis(m began her stage career 
in a musical comedv, but soon turned to 



HERE SOON 

Joan C^rawford 
In "RAIN' 



A^HERS; 



>ii 



SOON 

Clark (;at>le 

Carole LonibarJ-in 

"NO MAN OF 
HKR OWN" 



THURS., JAN. 2b 

William Ha'nes 

Madge Evans 

Conrad Nagle 

Cliff Ldwards — in 

'*FAST LIFE" 



FRI.. JAN. 27 

William Powell 

Joan IJiondell — in 

"LAWYER MAN " 

— added — 

pictures of entire ^aiiie 

U.S. CALIF. Tt NOTRE DAME 

FOOT BALL < ;AME 

"TECHNOCRACY" 

Explained by Ejcfwrts 



.SAT., JAN. 2K— 2 Features 



Jame^ Dunn 

Hoots Mai lory- Kl Hrcmk 

in'HANDLE WITH 

CARE" 

— co-feature — 

Mit/.i Green— in 

"LITTLE ORPHAN 

ANNIE" 



MON.. TUFS.. JAN. .^0-.U 

Norma Shearer — Clark Cable — in 
♦•STRANGE INTERLl I)K ' 



WEDNESDAY. FKK. I 

Boris KarlolT 
in "THE MUMMY' 



GOTHAM ADJL STABLES 

The Silk Hosiery that can be adjusted to the exact length desired 
now $1.00 pair — Service or Chiffon Weights 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



No. 1 Main St. Annherst, Mass. 

REl'AIRING AND ALL KINDS OK 
VVASHING DONE AT REASONABLE I'RICES 

Our Laundry First Cla:<s 

Our Policy Guaranlted 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 
lor Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, • MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



Typhig 
First Class Work Low Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sift" House 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 
And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



THE CANDY KITCHEN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 



SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 



INCORPORATED 




Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1933 



Number 14 



Housing Situation Shown 
In Recent Alumni Survey 



Alumni Recommend New 
Dormitories Be Built 

lAii'^si^e rental costs, crowded condi- 
,i„ii> in rooming houses, and the incon- 
vi-iiiiiue to stndents who are coniiH'Ued 
m live long distances from campus are 
^WH- of the reasons embo<lied in the 
rioimmendation by the Asstjciate .Alumni 
lor the erection of new dormitories. This 
rf,(iiiinun<lation is the result of a survey 
tomlucted last fall by a s{>ecial committee 
oft he Alunmi. 

Because I lie dormitories on campus 
ariomnuKlate only 22% of the men 
>iiiiltnts and 52'^ of the women stu<lents, 
ihf rentals of off-campus rooms are in- 
creased l)eyond the value of the rooms. 
Thi' average weekly rental for a single 
riKHii is !$.{.t«), for a double ro<jm, $2.94. i 
The Stockbridge School students localise 
of ihiir late arrival in the fall are com- 
jkIIkI to pay very high rentals. 

rill crowded con<litions of rooming 
h(ui>ts are illustrated by this actual case 
taktii from the Alumni survey. In one 
hou-f, a triple decker, live three families, 
all of which take student ro<miers. Each 
floor is reached by an enclosed stairway 
at cither end of the connecting halls of 
lac h tenement. There is no provision for 
isol.iting stairways in case of fire. On 
(Continued on Pafte 6. Column 3) 



SHAKESPEAREAN 
ROLES PRESENTED 



Edith Matthison Gives Readings at 
Social Union 




Tlif ColUxiatt presents for the first time 
"The College Spectator," an interpretation 
of the '^'eek's news. Us function is to make 
altve for you the «'<r«/s of the iceek in the 
dlliniale and outside world.- Editor 



TKIINOCRACY AGAIN 

/'!'• London Spectator, representing the 
k,iisli~li view of America, has this to sa\ 
ahiiiit Technocracy: ". . . it is still very 
(lilfidilt to dis<x)ver what the technoi rats 
art- ilriving al, and on the understanding 
i>( ii \vf so far have, the furore of the new 

"trines created across the .Atlantic does 
ii'd '.^ive great credit to the stability of 
Atii. 1 1. ;»ii opinion." 



M)(>I.I»H HITLER 

A'lnli.h Miller has his long awaited 

'I'lMiiiiiiy to emulate his great hero, 

M i".)lini, and to save the (ierman 

"itt. If he can <lo as mmh for (jcr- 

'!' i~ Miis-iolini has accom|)lishfd for 

1' ' I -lill retain the siipixjrt of his 

I""1>|' and maint.iin ix.'acifid intcr- 

nt't'iital relations, he will show himself 

n-.it man. But it is «loubtful 

«iaili. rthe brown shirt and the swa-lika 

'in ^,tM (i(rman\. Should he show 

iireserve his people from chaos, 

'"Jtti\ir. he will have the supfKjrt of his 

r> (iiilf f,,r t(„.y .,r,. weary of unstable 

\<»\ SCIMEICHER 

^ !ilt i(her's resignation is to Ix' 

'')r he showed promise. It has 

'' ii'l that he jjossesses "a dialwlical 

"^'T mind." Me is described as a 

I'''n(i of intrigue, a creature of du,")licity, 

i Ki, Ii.-lieu who wears the uniform of the 

ariin r .,},,.r x\y^^ ^l^^, ^^^^. ,,f jj^^ cardinal. 

'■" oft he most brilliant diners-out 

111' is suave antl graceful, a 

< inversationalist, and a mys- 

-1 'ly which has been augmented 

-!" I t(d resignation. 



Six scenes ranging from the tr.igech of 
"Hamlet" to the comedy of "As \ ciu 
Like it" was rendered by Edith Wynne 
Matthison, Shakesja'arcan re.ider, in 
Howker .Auditorium last Friday evening. 
Her interpretations of the great Shakes- 
pearean roles were well received by the 
audience. 

Miss Matthison's program iiic bided the 
following: a s«-ene from "Twelfth Night" 
l>etween \'iola and Olivia, the balcony 
scene from "Romoo and Juliet," Cather- 
ine's s|K'c-ch to the King and tin- Cardinal 
in "Menry the Eighth," a scene from 
"Hamlet" and two scenes from "As Vou 
Like It." 

Edith Wynne Matthison (Mrs. Charles 
Rann Kennedy) is regarded in luiro|K' 
and .America as one of the cles crest 
artists of the day. Ecjually gifted in her 
interpretation of tragdy and comedy, her 
work is characterized b\ triilh, cmntinnal 
mastery and matchless form. Hir Euripi- 
dean roles earned her the name, "our 
greatest tragic actress." Iler unfc)rgci,d)le 
Everyman, Juliet, Kos.dind, Sister Bea- 
trice, The Pi|Kr, and the unicpie series of 
parts written for her by her husljand have 
eH«4> «wrk*^l an e|>«Mh, a new de|)ai1ure 
in cirainatic >tyle, interpretation and 
significance. 

The Record- Herald, Chicago, Illinois, 
states the following apprcc iaticm of Miss 
M.ilthison: "Never before has there 
been fjp|K)rlunif y to study at one time 
the art of this giflcci woman in so many 
of its phases. Such stud> is a privilege." 



DELTA PHI ALPHA, 
PHI ZETA RANK FIRST 

Collejie .\verafte is 74.61 

Delta IMii .Alpha has the highest .ncr.ige 
.inion^; the fraternities for the first term, 
wliilc I'lii Zeta stands hinhcsi among the 
sororities figures compiled by the Dean's 
office show. The gencr.d a\erage for 
Hcimen is higher than tli.it of the men, 
and the college avc'Mge is 74. til. The 
figures for the indi\idual grcnips follow: 
Delta Phi Al|)ha 
Phi Zcta Sorority 
Theta Chi 

Lambda Dc Ita Mu Sorcirity 
Kappa iCpsilon 
Lamlxla Chi .Alpli.i 
Sigma Bc-t:i Chi Snorilv 
Alpha Laiiibd.i Mu, Sorority 
Alpha ( iaiiima Kho 
Sigma Phi l\psilon 
Phi Sigma K.i|i|>ii . 
Kappa Sigma ... 

.Alpha Sigma Phi 
Q.T.V. 
Non-Fraternity 

(includes all W'iO men) 
Non-Sorority .... 
(includes all ly.'Ut women) 
Cieneral Average Men 
Crtniral .Avc-rage Women 
College A\c rage 

(]lass Averaites 
imii Men . . 

Women 

Class , 

V.VM Men ... 

Women 

(ieneral Class 
H).!.") Men 

Women 

Class 
llt.J<; Men 

Women 

Class 
(ieneral Average Women 
(ieneral .\\erage Men 
Average' for College 



7i> ita 
79 4 
79 28 
79 22 
7H 'H\ 
78 40 
78 21 
71 i :i7 
7fi ;«» 
70 21 
7rrr.2 
75 44 
75 .■11 
75 2 



74.18 

74 37 

75 28 

74 (il 

79 ;w 

80 28 

79 Kl 

80 01 
79 87 
72 72 
72 81 
72 75 
70 l;{ 
7.'L27 
70 i«0 

75 28 
74 ;{7 
74 ni 



POULTRY TEAM PLACES 
SECOND IN CONTEST 



' in ulated in Washington say 

'I'at ill,. Japanese War Office possesses 

'""s tor the invasion of China proper 

' 'T the- seizure of Jehol is complete. If 

uriiors materialize, there will te 

■■^''li- inmble since (ireat Britain and 

(Continued on Vmf 2, Cduinn 3) 



Annual Mardi Gras 

This Friday Evening 

Elal»orate costumes and hall decorations 
will feature the annual Mardi < iras whic h 
is to be held in the Drill Mall, Friday, 
Februar\ :5. from H to 12 p.m. 

In order that there may be no itMoii- 
venience in the matter of obtaining cos- 
tumes, the committee has ken able to 
arrange with BucheM)lz, the S|)ringfield 
c-ostumer, to l)e on canifuis in the Memo- 
rial Building all day Thursday , Fc briiary 
2, with a large assortment of costumes. 
These costumes will Ix- a\ailal)le at 
speiiil reduced rate. The favorable re- 
ception given to the committees' activi- 
ties indicates that the entire campus is 
anticipating the return of the Mardi 
C.ras in the oiii;inal form of former \cars. 

James T. Cleland to be 
Sunday Chapel Speaker 

Mr. James T. Clcl.niil -•! .\ni!i. r-' 
College will siK-ak at Sunday Cha|>el, . 
February 5. Mr. Cle land, as professor of \ 
religion at Amherst College, has at : 
presem the largest elective course in 
beginning religion, with nimty student^ 
enrolled. 

Mr. Cleland \va> formerly .i So'ii-li 
Fellow at the Inion Theological S, inin- 
ary in New York. .After having <om-i 
plcted a year of study at Inion, he ob- 
tained his degree at the C.raeluate S hcKil 
of Theology in Clasgow, Scotland, and 
later taught there. Besides his teaching 
of religion at Amherst, Mr. ( 1. l.n'l 
preaches regularly at Mt. HoKoke Colle ge ! 
and is also the assistant coae h of s<K.e r : 
at Amherst College. Me is a ver> humor- 
ous speaker, and has proved to Ix- verv 
popular, both at Amherst and Mmint 
Holyoke College. 



Riseman and Arn(»ld Win Individual 
Gold Awards 

High scoring by Menry F. Riseman, 
Smart .A. Arnold, aiiel Robert .M. Kcnh, 
all of 19.*{5, en.ihleel the .Ma>s. State 
|K)ultry juelging te.im to win second plae:e 
in the sixteenth annual eastern inter- 
collegiate poultry judging ef»ntesl in 
Trenton, N. J., January 25. 

In ad'lil ion to a siKc-r tro(>li\ for team 
work, Kiseman aiicl Arnold won individual 
gold awards for placing fourth and sixth, 
respectively. Teams entered by other 
colleges fini--hed in the fiillcjwing order: 
Cornell IniversitN, Rutgers CnivcrsJty, 
Iniversity of Noiili Carolina, I'niversity 
of New Maiii|isliire, anel Connecticut 
.'\gric ultiir.il College. Cornell's team was 
imicpie ill that its three men took the 
first three places. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



/.»■( Ml (unre lift (an little more supply 
1 kan juit to lixik ahmt us and tit die) 
V.xpatiatf free n'rr all thi'- sifnr nf man: 
\ mr-hlr mn-'' I'Vl not withmt a plan. 

I'ope—hssay on Man 

Wednesday. February I 

7 CK) I) in Ori lii"'tr.i rcli<ar-iHl. StockbritiKi- 

Mall 
T.nop.m. Animal lliir<l>an"lry ( liit> inwtinu, 
SKk ktiriilK"' Hall 
Thunday, February 2 . , „, . 

T.'iOli.ni. Uaml nhcarsiil, Memorial BldR. 
7.1.") II in. S-nati' iiifi-tinR 
Friday, February i 

:t(H) p. III. Xar^ity Ho. key, M.I.T. li<r.- 
soei p. III. Marili <fras. Drill Hall 
Saturday. February 4 , ,., . 

1 ."{O p.m. ( hf-i-i anil Ch<'ck<?r Club mi<>tinK, 

Mc»morial Hiiil-linR 
.'J.(X)p.m. \arsily Hcxkcy, Hamilton at 
( linton . „ ., 

8 to p.m. Kai ulty Re-ccption to President 

Bakpr. Mc-niorlal BiiildinR 
8.(X)p.m. \arsiiy Ba<kctl)all. Hamilton al 
Clinton 
Sunday. February 5 

9 DO a.m. Siimlay (liaixl. Mr. James T. 

Cleland of Amtiersl CoIIpkp 
."i.OOp.m. Radio Concert. .Mfmorial Bldij. 
4 ViO p m Y.W ( A. mirftinn 
Monday. February* , o ,, 

H rjO p in. (.Iw ' lub. Memorial BuildinK 
TucMlay. February 7 
CA'jv.m. UmKiiaiiP and Literature talk. 

Profcs^jr I'altersfm, Stexkbrirtgr Hall 
7 4.) p.m. <cjllp«ian competition 
H (JO p.m. CampU"! ( horusi. .Memorial BUlR. 



Hugh P. Baker Becomes 
Eleventh President Today 




DR. IIU(;il p. UAKKR 
Fleventh Prahldent of the Stale GolleA* 



DR. HAKKR'S (;RKKTIN(;S 

To the Student BcmIv of the 
Mass;ic htlselts .Sl.iti- College: 

It is a plc'.isiirc indeed for me to 
res|>oncl to the reipie-<l from the 
Collegian to s.iy just a word to t he 
student IkmI)- as I take up the work 
here at Massachusetts State. After 
but fort N'-eight hours on the campus 
I can do little more than extend |M-r- 
sonal greetings to all of >oii and tell 
>eju that I am clclightcd to Ik' licri' anci 
that I pledge ni^stlf to the soiincl 
flirt heraiiee' of the- work of the College-. 
I elo want to get acepiainted with you 
:tnd within :i few cl.ivs ho|H- to arr.in^c' 
for an hour ci twc> i .k li week when 
iii\ door will l>c' open to .ill ol Mill 
tli.it we iiia\ come to know each oilier 
well. 

VMi.it I he College is ancI what it will 
be ill the future will depend neither 
upon the I'resident nor upon the Presi- 
dent .iiid Faculty, but rather ujHm a 
friendly ancI jigressive- spirit of learn 
work on the part of all conci'rnecl with 
the College- students, Alumni, Facul- 
ty', administrative- oflice-rs .irid Trii-,- 
lees. 

The- College- oc i upie> .i strate-gie 
place in the- edu<'atie>n.'d life of the 
Stale, aiicl th.it Im-i aiwe- it is a public l\ 
siip|>orte-d ecliK iiiion.il institution with 
a fine recorel of se-r\ic e- back of i. . But 
in thi-M- clitTii lilt times we ciiinot ,iiic| 
wdl not be satisdeel with pasi aeeom- 
plishments. Rathe-r we- must all imi 
cc-iitr.ite tf) the ul mo->t on the cle\i lop 
ment lure at the College of a tolcr.int 
spirit of sounel scholarship and cm the- 
projc'cticjn intc) the- .Slate- of the liest 
we- have tf) give in helping it tci meet 
in a sensible- way the puy:/.liiig |iroblenis 
of so<-ial and economic readjustment 
which must be solvc-d reasonably if 
we arc- to li\e- satisfactorily togetlic-r. 
.\ ~Mii!ciii^. ic-achers and ciii/.en- wc- 
lia\C' mill h to gi\e- in I his c ril ii al pei ioil» 
.and if we- .are to be- worthy of the- Sl.ite- 
aiid what it has lonl rdiiiti d to tlu- 
III. iking of this Colli-ge-, we must ;;i\<- 
ot I he best of oiir>c'l\is willingly and 
fiilK. The Cc>lli-gc- h.is never failecl 
the Slate and will not at this time-. 
Miiuli V B.ik. r 



Prof. Speight Speaks 

on Individual Planning 

"Planning the Inner Life" was the 
subject chosen by Professor Harold E. 
B. SjK'ight of Dartmouth Ceirege for his 
adclress at Sunclay mcirning c ha(j«-l in 
Bowker .Auelitoriiim on January 2^t. 
Professor SjMight, whc) is a former p;isti,r 
of King's ChajK'l in Boston and is clean - 
eleert of Swarthmore Colle-ge, saiel that 
wc hear a gcKxl de-al about sfK'ial and 
economic: planning, but that wise man- 
(Continued on P»f fc. Columa &) 



Former Dean of College 
of Forestry at Syracuse 

l>i. Ilii^h Potter Baker, who succeeds 
Roseoe Wilfred Thatcher, began his 
offie i.il duties .is eleventh president of 
Massiic hiisetts Sl.ite College today. Pretii- 
deiit Bake-r who was elected by the 
Board of Tustees last ()ete>lM-r, was 
formerly Dean of the New Wuk State 
Collegeol l-"oic'str\ at .S\r.iciise I 'iiiversity. 

When President Thatcher announced 
his resign. It ion iM-caiise of ilMie-.ilth in 
April l<).iL', Dr. B.iker w.is the fust man 
asked to accept the- presidency. At that 
time President B.iker would not resign 
his |M)silion at Syracuse anel tlu- trustees 
were lomiielled to consider many other 
applicants. Unable to liiid anyone- suita- 
ble, the Trustees again pre\ailee| ii|ion 
Dr. Baker and tin.illy |M-rsuaeled him to 
leave Syracuse and to accept the prcsi- 
eleney of the St.ite- Cejllege. 

Dr. Baker is a brother of Kay Stannarel 
B.cker who writes under the p.seudonyin 
of David Cirayson. Both brothers gradu- 
ated from the- Michigan Agricultural 
Colle-ge. President Baker who is the 
younger of the two studied forestry at 
Vale I'liiveTMity ami the I'liiversily ui 
Munich after graduation. Me re-ceixeel 
the de-grees of M, ester ol I'oiestry from 
(Continued on Psfte 4, Column 4) 

4-H CLUBS BUILD 
ON CAMPUS SITE 

Truste«H Donate Land Kast of Power 
Mouse 

III order to pros iele a suitable nieetini; 
pi. ice on campus for 411 Club nu-mlM'rs, 
the lriisti-es of the- college ha\'e- ^raillecl a 
plot of land east ol the itouer plant .is a 
liermanent site for a 4 11 Club building 
which is to Ik- e-re-c led in the n«-ar future. 
.Mone-\' for the building has already 
lie-e-n eontribiite-d by the 4-11 e bibs in the 
slate. 

Intencleil as l:eac|cpiarle-rs ot the state 
4-M I liibs, the building will also serve as 
reception hall for ni<-mlN-rs of C.imp 
(iilbert cbirinv; the siiniiiier and will lie 
ilse-d by the K.D. Club cliiiiiig the- winter. 
The climensions of the biiilcling aciorclinK 
to tc-m|»orary plans will be .S<( x .'Vl feet 
.Kiel will coie-i^t III ciiii- l.irge li.ill. Pro- 
visions will be iii.ide- for i'iilarge-me-iit of 
the builcling, ai'ording to Mr. (leorge 
I'arley, sl.ite i hib li-.ider who i- in e h.trge-. 

MOST OF TAX DOLLAR 
IS FOR LOCAL NEEDS 

M.S.Ci. Rfonomics Deparlmetil Con- 
ducts Study 

Move than '.•<) ci-nts out of e-v«ry loe-al 
tax dollar, or !K).t> eents to In- e-xact, 
we-nt in V.i'-ll for local pur|K»ses. Of the 
remainder of the- elollar, .'j.X ei-nts went 
for county tax and ;{..'{ ce-n1s for state tax, 
.iiiording tc» a study made- by the ec«>- 
noniic s cjepartme-nt eif the- Masnarhuiietts 
State College for the- st.ite •xfensicjn 
se-rvice and (iresciited to them at a re-<e-nt 
meeting. 

The- average (>erson. declares David 
Kci/man, who made- the study and who 
obt.'iine-d his figi..e-s from the state tax 
commissiem, fails to realize all tht- bene- 
fits he- re-ceives frr>ni his tax mcmey anel 
that most of his taxes are- s|M-nt within 
his own community. During the year 
102*.>, 77 ee-nt'> out of every dc»ll;ir ex- 
|H.'nc|ed in the- state was e-X|N-ncled by city 
anel tc)wn, 17 cents w.is for state work, 
and '1 cc-nts for county work. 

The cfollar c)f all .Massac husetts govern- 
mental units in 1J>2*.> was s|K'nt as follows: 
ediicatiem 27.1 cents, highways 12.1 cents, 
fire anel jMjIice protection II). H cents, 
public welfare R.'icents, health anel sani- 
(Contlnuad on Pat* fc, Columo 4) 



I 



" ^i9iVS 0»3 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1933 




/Ilba00acbu6etlP Collegian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Thursday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

JOSBPH POI.ITKLLA 

bjditor-4n-Ckit/ 



Raymond Royal '34 

EUGBNB GURALNICK '33 

Managint EiUors 



Alfrkoa L. Ordwav '33 
i4<toc<a4« Editor 



News Department 
Raymond Royal '34. Kdikir 
Alfuda L. Ordway '33 
Ruth D. Campbell '34 
HARRirm M. Jackson '34 
Mary L. Allbn '35 
David L. Arknbirg '35 
Elizahetu K. Hakrincton '35 
Ed!1H M. Parsons '36 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 

Editorial 

JosKFU Pulitblla 

Athletlca 

Theodorb M. Lbary '35 
Silas Littlb, Jr. '35 
Glbnn F. Shaw '35 



Feature 

Stanley F. Sepbrski '34 



Bicbanftes 
Alfrboa L. Ordway '33, Editor 



Edward I. Talbot '34 
AdtirtiiiHg Manat*r 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashlby B. Gurnby '33 

BusiH4ss Afanagtr 



Frank Batstone '34 

W. Lawrence Schenck '34 



Buslnaea Aaalatanta 

John Wood '35 



Hbrbbrt Jenkins '34 
Circulation Managtr 

Nblson Stevens '35 
GEORCB PEA>iB '35 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 

Entered as second-claM matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for maillns at special rate 
of postage provided for In Section 1103. Act of October, 1917, authorized August 20, 1918. 



STATE 



A junior was re|Kirling orall>, in a 
public s|)caking class, the health activi- 
ties of a neighboring town. He descrilx'd 
at great length the sanitation, food pro- 
tection, etc., and he continued, "The 
health authorities traced the source of 
typhoid to a milkman. Going to his 
home, they found his wife washing a milk 
bottle with a sore throat." 

ss 

1st nut: "Going to the Mardi Gras?" 
2nd ditto: "Yeah." 
1st: "What as?" 
2nd: "Adam." 

ss 

The new athletic insignias are out. 
The Maroon sweater with the big M is 
the football sweater, the maroon sweater 
with the middle-sized red M is the soccer 
sweater, the mariMjn sweater with the 
little M is the cross-country sweater, and 
the little while sweater with the maroon 
letter is Davie Caird, twice captain of 
the cross-roimtry team. 

- — ■ — ss 

What is a varsity sweater anyway? . . . 
With ail thesi- freak jaikets and sweaters 
of all colors of the rainlniw (and stjme 
not in it) that are bedecked and adorned 
with various colUge, fraternity an<I 
sorority seals. And even class numerals! 



aiumnt "Kotes 



^ 
^ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY* FEBRUARY, 1, 1933 




EDITORIALS 



4^ 4jf 



-8S- 



s 



4^ ^ 4* 

PRKSiDEN i BAKKR AND THE ST.\ lUS OF THE COLLEGE 

There is little e.xaggerat ion in the rclleilion that llie |>r()Kress and growth of (he 
Massachusetts State College and the value of its educational offtrings to the indi- 
vidual and to the slate which it serves, ha\e been largely delermined by the inter- 
pretation that each of our ten presidents has given to the kcy-phra^c of the .Morrill 
Act of 1«<)2 "The leading olijed (of the laml-grant college) shall be, without ex- 
cluding other siientilic and classical stu<lies ... to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriniltiire and the me< hanic arts . . . and to promote the iiijeral 
and practical eiluc.ilion of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
of life." And to this it can l)e said, again without intent to overestimate the virtues 
of our past executives, nor to dwell critically upon their shortcomings, that they have 
been like the i)ruverbi.il blind men who tried lo conieive of the elephant, b> con- 
fining themselves to the examination of single menil)ers of his Ixxly. Naturally 
enough, while each cmpluNed the term "elephant" to descrilK- the animal, eai h had a 
decidedly different idea in his mind as to what the creature resembled. Thus it is 
that to President Chadl>ourne the educational training in this college should be 
agricidtiire with infusions of the s«ientific method of research; to Proident Clark, 
the ph>si(al silences and sfienlijic agriculture; to President (joodeil, the biological 
sciences and the humanities; to President liutlerfield, practical and vocational a^-ri- 
cullure, rural s<Kiolog\, agricultural education, and the useable aspects of the hu- 
manities and theoretical sciences; and to President Thatcher, the piirjwse of the 
institmion was, in essence, "to promote lil>eral and practical education." 

It is easy to see, then, that the objective of the college has been one and the same 
throughout its sixty-six years of exisience, even though the emphasis has been placed 
once here and once there, according to each administrator's conception of the media 
of education. There is little doubt, that throughout the course of its history the 
college has fulfdlcd its h-ading function of teaching subjects related to agriculture, 
and providing, by no means incompletely, "other scientific studies." But the fact 
remains that while the legal status of the college has remained comparatively fixed 
since its establishment in IHIlT, the f(»rces and motives of education, have gone 
through almost a complete swing of the jiendulum. No longer is it the main object 
of higher education to prepare the student for the three learned professions —the 
law, medicine, and the ministry, as it was prior to 18<»0; no longer is there an in- 
sistent demand on the part of the middle classes nor the solely in<lustrial groups, for 
that niattt r, for students who ha\e speiiali/ed in some phase of |»urel> agricultural 
e«lucation, as there was in the jK-riod succeeding the Civil War. As a matter of fact, 
the life of the eihualional world has undergone the s;ime shift in emphasis as is 
noticeable in the history an<l growth of this institution- a transfiring of that em- 
phasis from practical agrii ulture, pure and simple, which dominatecl the t-arliest 
program of instrtKtion, to scienlitir agriculture and the more theorttital sciences 
toward the close of the cencury, and the infusion of such subjects into the curriculum 
that make for a rounded, "lilieral," education, within recent \ears. Today, the 
college is calle<l upon to provide, not a s| ecialized traiiiing in the agricultural and 
mechanical sc iences, but a general education, embracing all subjects, humanistic as 
well as purely "scieniific," an<l the preparation of the student for living the good life 
as well as for s)ine sort of gainful occupiti mi. 

It is |),irii(ularly in this ptriod of flux and (hanging ide.ils, in this time of eeonomic 
hardships and mental dei)res^ions, in these moments of shifting emphasis in education, 
that the State College has need of a judi( ions leader. Our problen s must be ministered 
to b\ a m.in of wisdom and of understanding, one who can aliun us to the true and 
the ideal in education. The jwjsition. President of the Massachusetts State College, 
calls for one wh«) will devote his energies to the untangling of our momentary diffi- 
culties-increasing student enrollment, decreasing state a|)propria.ions, the housing 
situaticm, and numl>erless others. True, all too true; but to our minds, the greatest 
problem, an<l by no means the least of the immediate, is to strike a pro(K'r balance 
of emphasis lietween our intellectual growth and physical expansion; a necessary 
mean between our curriculum and extra-curriculmn undertakings; a harmonious ex- 
pansion of the v.irious divisions of the college, not sacrificing the development of one 
to another. We have need of an educator to carry out the pur|)Oses to which this 
college has l)een pledged: ves, but .ilong with this dut\ to the state and the nation 
must come the all-im|K»rt.tnt obligations to the individual's growth. We have neeil 
of a man of insight who can envision our prolilems as they will shape themselves in 
the future; a man of refinement, culture, and broadened intellect; a man of diplo- 
matic understanding; a man of ideals who devotes his life to them. We must have a 
practical, un<lerstanding leader, an administrator of vision and intuition one who 
can give to students and the college a pur|K)se and balance in life. 

As far as his past record speaks for him, we feel that in President Hugh P. Baker, 
we have found a leader for the insiitu.ion who can cope with our problems. His 
aggressive leadership, whi( h displays itself in terms of his work at the Iowa State 
College, Pennsyhania State College, antl the New York State College of Forestry, 
shows him to be .i man of unusual ix)wer, a man who reaches his destination because 
he is one of Carlyle's battle-scarre<i gi.uits who coidd not l)e kept down. 

(Continued on Pafto 6) 



Keeping up with Webster: 

"B.V.U., a shmg term applied especially 
to a certain s|)ecies of co-ed meaning 
blonde, vivacious, and dumb." 

R. I. State College senior questionnaire: 

Arc you engaged? Yes 27, No (V-i. 

Do you intend to marry? Yes 75, No 12. 

Favorite sport? Basketball .'?4, Foot- 
ball 31, Ping-|K)ng 1, Co-edding 1. 

Do you drink? Yes 42, No 49. 

Do you lulieNe in co-education? Yes 
81), No 9. 

I lave you vvvr gone co-edding? Yes 70, 
No 22, Think I'm c razy? 1. 

Most common subject of bull sessi«ms? 
Sex 42, Women 18, What do you think? 1. 

Approximate lost of "date"? $2.00 17, 
Nothing ."), $U) 5, $.05 1. 

Greatest thing accjuired in college edu- 
cation? Friendshij) 1.5, Room-mates 
clothes, appetites, debts 1. 

Which do you prefer? Brunettes 4C, 
Blondes .'{;{, Reds 7, No iminalion 4. 

What living figures do you admire 
most? Jean Harlow 20, (ihandi 7, Ann 
Corio ■}, Female 2, My girl's 2. 

What figure in history do you admire 
most? Lincoln 20, Cleopatra 10, Wash- 
ington 9, Casanova, Lady Godiva 1. 

Favorite novelist? Sinclair Lewis 9, 
Vicki Baum 5, Wayne King, Chic Side 1. 

Quite ver^atile these Little Rhody men! 
ss 

Ashes of Hell Week. . . Freshman darn- 
ing socks at the Abbey. . . Co-ed offering 
ice cream cone to cop on the corner. . . 
Co-eds l(M)king for a stone bench in the 
wrong cemetery. . . A couple of the frosh 
washing the dunnny uptown. . . One 
taken for a ride and hitched hiked his 
way back liefore his tormenters arrived. 
... A co-ed begging for a piece of bread 
and butter from one of the frat houses. . . 
F"reshmen fishing for the whale that 
swallowed Jonah. . . Another drinking a 
milkshake in t h<' candy kitchen by means 
of a nursing bottle and nipple. . . And so 
far into the annals of historv. 



'24 Robert M. Darling is an invest- 
ment adviser and statistician with Bond 
& Goodwin, Inc., 30 Federal St., Boston. 
He writes, "the depression KiV/end. Don't 
worry!" 

Michael Rowell '24, Henry Walker '10, 
and Harry Nissen '14 are assisting in the 
|)lans for the banquet. 

Dennis M. Crowley of '29 entertained 
some of the local alumni during the 
Chri-stmas holidays. Those ()resent were 
Ducky Swan '27, John Sullivan '29, Bob 
Bowie '29, Johnnie Kay '29, Charlie 
Little '30 and Oswald 1 ipix) '32. 

Allan Reid, graduate student '28, was 
in Boston during the Christmas holidays 
visiting friends. Allan has obtained a 
one-year leave of absence from Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute where he is a mem- 
ber of the faculty and in charge of cam- 
pus planning. He is at present at Cornell 
doing further graduate work in archi- 
tecture. 

Justin J. McCarthy '21 is d(jing sjiecial 
siiles work in the textile industry f<ir the 
.Merrimac Chemical Company. Jerry was 
recently apjujinted a director in the Sun- 
light Chemical Company of Providence. 
He is a member of the Association of 
Textile Colfjrists and Chemists. He is 
also a member of the University Club and 
vice-i)resident of the Massachusetts State 
Alumni Clid) of Boston. 

Henry M. Walker '10, Thomas Dooley 
'14 and John (Vosl)y '25 were ap|Kjinled 
as a nominating connnittee for the 
election of new officers at the ban(|uet. 

Blondy Mills and Bob Nash, Ijoth of 
'29, returned home to Boston for the 
Christmas holidays. 

'20 Lawrence P. Martin is in the 
highway construction business. His ad- 
dress is 47 Mamaroneck Avenue, White 
Plains, N. Y. 

'20 Clifton Scott has a farm in 
Ashfield, Mass. 

'21 John Snow has moNed from 
Denver, Colorado to .'539 West Lynwood 
St., Phoenix, Arizona. He is field repre- 
sentative for the Atlantic Commission 
Comi)any Inc., and is sjxnding the winter 
at Nogales, Arizona, buying Mexican 
peas and tomatoes. 

'23 Charles (i. Shar|x- teaches science 
in the West field Mass. High School. 

'20 (jforge Campl>ell is nf)rthwestern 
freight agent for the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad in Minnea|X)lis, Minn. He 
writes that he sees a lot of Ralph Brown 
w'19 who is an instructor at the l'ni\er- 
sity of Minnesota; that he also sees Paul 
Latham '17 who is with the Travelers 
Insurance Company of Minnea|x>lis; and 
that he finds Minneajjolis a "wonderful 
city." 

'30 Ray Mann is recreational diredor 
in Lancaster, "the finest small town in 
Massachusetts, bar none," says he. 
Among other things Ray supervises a 
year-round recreational program for some 
two hundred men and women, boys and 
girls. Last winter his men's basketball 
ti'am won 27 out of 33 games which is no 
mean record. At guard, on one of the 
teams Ray's proteges played, a team com- 
jxised mostly of ex- Worcester Tech 
players, was none other than your old 
friend, Ray Smiley, Mass State '2t). 



Profess<ir Charles P.itterson will spcik 
next lues<lay night at 0.45 in Stockl)ri(lj;(. 
Hall in the Language and Literature st riis 
of talks. 

On January 28, Alpha Lambda .Mu 
stjrority held a party for its pledges at 
the Amherst Rifle Club cabin. 

The department of dairy industry luts 
just completed its two short courses in 
market milk. The courses were brou^rjit 
to a close Friday evening, January 27, 
with an informal banquet in Dr,i|Hr 
Hall. Professor Frandsen acted as toast- 
master and brief talks were givm t,y 
Professors Lindquist and Mack as well 
as by the students in the courses. Prac- 
tically every part of Massachusetts was 
represented in these short courses, and 
some attended from outside the state. 



Stochbri^ae 



The mid-term marking jK-riod for 
Stockbridge School students terminates 
on Saturtlay, February 4. Grade sheets 
will be sent out January 30. Instriutor-, 
are request e«l to tuin in refxirts to tin 
Short Course Office not later than Mo.n- 
day, February 0. 



After assisting his team to take siromi 
place in the intramural meet by gtttinij 
23 |)oints, Harold Pears<m of Lowell, 
captain of Stockbridge track, ran in the 
Bishoj) Cheverus KKKI-yard race at the 
William C. Prout Memorial games in the 
Boston Garden, Saturday, January 28, hut 
failed to place. 

Charles Currier S'33 spent the wiek-md 
at the home of his parents in Meridin, 
Connecticut. 



A cat, whi<h was admitted as a mem- 
ber of the class of '35 at Syracuse- I'ni- 
versity, was placed in charge of the dean 
of women. After a short time it was 
transferred to the sujK-rvision of the 
clean of men. 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 

At a recent meeting of the freshmen 
class, th<' following officers were elected; 
President, John Stewart; X'ice-Presidenl, 
Miss Beatrice Rafter; Secretary, Mi^s 
Maida Riggs; Treasurer, Cummin^s La- 
throp; Cajjtain, Fred Murphy; and 
Sergeant -at -arms, Edward .Sjulliere. 

CHESS AND CHECKER CLUB 

Louis I. Winokur '35 was elected pre!-!- 
dent of the Chess and Checker Club at .i 
recent meeting heUI in the Senate room 
at the Memorial building. Meetings are 
to l)e hehl every Satur<lay at 1:30 p.m. 
It is the pur|iose of the club to have a 
chess and checker tournament among the 
memlRTs and then to challenge the 
faculty. Several games have Ix-en played 
to illustrate \arious moves of the chess- 
men, while in other games several mem- 
Ix'rs are rejxjrtetl to have shown promise. 

The following students attended the 
first meeting of the club: Richard llub- 
bani '35, Harlan King.sbury '35, Wilbur 
Tirrell '35, Ralph Arnold '30. RoIkti 
Lincoln '3»», David Pearlmutter "i*''. 
Stephen Puffer '30 and Oliver Putnam '36. 



glorious vacation in a man's city and like 
a child throwing a numkey-wrench into 
the governmental machine when it doe? 
not i)roduce what he wants. 



THE COLLEGE SPECTATOR 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

the I'nileci .States have nmch to lose in 
China. Ja|>an plans this imasion to 
silence all opjwsition in Peiping and 
Tientsin. 



ss ■ 

Twenty-seven Fordham students 
crashed a New Ro.helle College (for 
women) by claiming to be members of 
the Fordham Ram and that they were 
on "official" business. Out of the 27 
reporters, 25 were im|X)sters and two 



were fakes. ss 

At Creighton University, the originator 
of the week's worst weep must wear a 
brown derby for a [nriod of seven days. 
The last wearer was a law student who 
arose \(ry solierly in the course of a 
lecture and stated that a certain man 
wascoiuicted for "manslewer." 
s» 

A senior asked a prof to let him off 
fifteen minutes early so he could see his 
girl in Hamp. Doc says, "Well son, if she 
loves you she won't mind wai.ing 15 
minutes. Stay here ami study your Ent." 



ROOSEVELT 

Back of R<K)se\ilt there lurks the 
figure of another Colonel House. Still a 
lolonel, this new [KTsonage is as friendly 
with the President-elect as Hoii.-c ever 
was with Wilson. He is Colonel Louis 
McHenry Howe. He has been called 
valet, secretary, man-lxhind-the-scenes, 
writer of speeches, far seeing prophet, 
|x)litical dreamer anel finder of jx>werful 
poetic allusions. He is Rewsevelt's closest 
[xrsonal aelviser. In the White House he 
will be the brains of the secretariat, a real 
jx)wer behind the throne. 



HUEY LONG 

Washington is puzzled and worried 
over its latest problem, one as serious as 
that of the lionus Army, Huey Long. 
With extraordinary conceit and self- 
confidence. Senator Long from Louisianna 
wants to Ix- dictate)r of the L'nited Slates. 
He has a way of acting like a child. In 
fact most of Washington's workers, |X)li- 
licians, and diplomats cemsider him a 
mischeivous child, who is haxing a 



DEMOCRATS 

The Democrats were wont to sa\ thai 
the Re()ubliean party was composed of 
the great capitalists, industrial ieafJers 
and all others who controUeel America > 
weahh. One is ine lineel to doubt this 
statement after scanning a list of promi- 
nent Demeurats. Here arc a few name* 
Owen Yoimg, industrialist; Bernini Ba- 
ruch, banker; J. J. Raskob, builder oi 
the Emi)ire State building; \\arncr 
Brothers; Pierr S. eiePont; Willi."" K. 
Vanderbilt ; Melvin Traylor, banker; etc 

COLLEGIATE SMOKERS 

Do students who smoke receive higher 
or lower marks than students who do not 



smoke? In an attempt to an 



swcr this 
con- 



ejuestiejn, a survey was recently 
ducted by Creighton University in Omaha. 
Nebraska, among its students. The ri 
sidt of the survey showed that inoelerate 
smokers received the highest marks, t 
non-smokers received the next hight' 
marks, and the excessive smokers t e 
lowest. Dr. Thomas Houhon oi ll"' 
Creighton University Medical school i" 
an interpretation of the survey ^ 
•'.Moeleratc smoking tends to make i 
student more comprised and aids nin 
api)lication to his work and concentrati' 
on diffie idt problems." 




Marcus Aurelius 
and His "Meditations" 

The Growth into a New Spirit 

It is a commonplace to note that one 
who lives for any period of time in a 
community comes to witness many 
changes — not only changes that involve 
the passing of neighbors and friends, of 
ancient landmarks and hallowed memo- 
ries, but changes that include the adop- 
tion of new attitudes, points of view, 
opinions and ideas on the part of the* 
({roup, altogether unthinkable fornierly. 
To this truism, a college community, 
far from being any exception, is, of all 
groups, most susceptible. When I ob- 
serve that I have been living and working 
with the student body of our college for 
quite some time, I am saying, I suppose, 
what every one who knows me at all is 
well aware of, and when I leiok back over 
this stretch of time in relation to our 
students, the one outstanding faci that 
impresses me concerning them is just 
this: the growing number of our under- 
graduates who more and more are "of 
those who," in the phrase of Matthew 
,\rnold, "would live in the spirit." At 
once, I hasten to make clear my thought, 
for I most certainly do not mean, —and 
were such true I should never think of 
connnending the fact,— that there is any 
ixrceptibte growth here of a namby- 
pamby goody-goodyism which is always 
alarmingly near to an attituele of subtle 
sham and sycophancy, than which what 
can be more devastating to a man or to 
his life? Of course, I mean merely that 
as the years have come and gone, I find 
among our students a greater numl)cr who 
would measure worth by a spiritual as 
oppe>sed to a material or sensuous scale 
of values; who are coming to perceive 
that all the mighty bustle of our civi- 
lization or of our technocracy, if you will, 
with its strivings and ambitions, its 
bickerings and jealousies, its fret and 
(ever, tta chance and change, its struggle 
and even its so-called success — in the end 
is little more than dust and ashes, at 
best a kaleidoscopic simulacrum; and 
that the only enduring satisfactions of 
life are found in a world of values, in 
the Platonic world, if you please, of 
ideas or patterns or universals, or if you 
prefer Paul to Plato in "the things which 
are unseen as eternal." 

If, now, these observations of mine 
accord at all with the actual mtxxl of 
our student body or at least of a minority 
of our student body, it has seemed to me 
that some of the undergraduates would 
1h> interested in such a rare soul as this 
article— inadequately to be sure — pro- 
pf)ses to present. Those who are not 
interested or those who are quite certain 
that a world of sense experience is the 
only real world, of course, need read no 
farther in this paper, for it is my inten- 
tion, however insufficiently, to write 
somehwat of Marcus Aurelius who, in 
the judgment of Lecky, was "the purest 
and gentlest spirit of all the pagan 
world" and who by Matthew Arnold 
was set apart as "the friend and aider of 
thejse who would live in the spirit." 

The Life of Marcus Aurelius 

The life of Marcus Aurelius was 
passed in the second century of the 
Christian era in that favored age, when, 
to quote Gibbon, "If a man were called 
to fix the period in the history of the 
world, during which the condition of the 
human race was most happy and pros- 
Porous, he would, without hesitation, 
name that which elapsed from the eleath 
«f Domitian to the accession of Com- 
modus. ,. The forms of the civil admin- 
istration were carefully preserved by 
Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, and the An- 
to.iines, who delighted in the image of 
libfTty, and were pleased with consider- 
'ng themselves as the accountable 
ministers of the laws. Such princes de- 
^r^ed the honour of restoring the re- 
public had the Romans of their days 
wen capable of enjoying a rational free- 
dom." Such a tranquil period Marcus 
himself had, by his justice and mild- 
ness and public spirit, done not a little 
^o establish. Again, the tribute which 
Gibbon pays to Marcus and his prede- 
cessfjr, Antoninus Pius, is not overstated. 

Their united reigns are possibly the 
^nly period of history in which the happi- 



ness of a great people was the sole object 
of government." 

Such being the verdict of history, we 
may well juuse to inquire more sjxcifi- 
cally ctmcerning what manner of man this 
Marcus was. Once more we shall do well 
to consider the estimate of Gibbon, who 
in contrasting Marcus with his pieelecessor 
and foster-father, Antoninus Pius, writes, 
"The virtue of Marcus Aurelius Anton- 
inus was of a severer and more laborious 
kind. It was the well-earned harvest of 
many a Icarneel conferenee, of many a 
pa. lent lecture, and many a. midnight 
lucubration. At the age of twelve years 
he embrace'd the ri^;id system of the 
Stoics, which taught him to submit his 
body to his minel, his passie)ns to his 
reason; to consider virtue as th' only 
good, viee as the only evil, all tbings 
external as things indifferent. His 'Medi- 
tations,' composed in the tumult of a 
camp, are still extant; and lu' even con- 
desee'ueleel lo gi\e lessons of philosophy 
in a more public manner than was per- 
ha|)s eenisistent with the moilesty of a 
sage, e)r (he elignily of an empe ror. Bui 
his life was the noblest commentary on 
the pre'CH-pts e»f Ze'uo. He was severe to 
himself, indulgent to the iiufx'rfections 
of others, just and Ixiieficent lo all man- 
kind. Ho regretted that Avidius Cassius, 
who excited a rebellion in Syria, had dis- 
ap|x>inled him, by a voluntary death, of 
the pleasure of converting an enemy into 
a friend; and he justified the sineerily of 
that seniiment, by nioderatmg the zeal 
of the senate against the adherents of the 
traitor. War he eletested, as the disgrace 
and calamity of human nature; but when 
the necessity of a just defence called u|»on 
him te> take- up arms, he readily e'Xi)osed 
his ixrson lo eight winter eampaigns on 
the frozen banks of the Danube, the 
se\erity of which was at last fatal to the 
weakness of his const it utieiii. His menie>ry 
was revered by a grateful posterity, anel 
above a century after his death, many 
persons preser\e'd the image- e)f Marcus 
Antonius among those oi their house hold 
gexls." Such is the sketch, terse and 
vivid that we find e)f Marcus Aurelius 
in the work of the greatest historian of 
the Roman Empire. 

The Stole View of Life 
What, then, were the lift prim iples of 
this great soul? As (iibbon mentions, 
Marcus Aurelius early embraced the 
prine-iples of .Stoicism, that system of 
philosophy in whie h pagan ethical thciught 
culminated; that system which in many 
res|)ects was so close to Christianity, but 
wliich in other ways was f.ir from Chris- 
tian ideals; that system which the Em- 
pere)r's own life did so much to illuminate. 
The system was, as the- late Williston 
Walker of Yale University rem.irks in 
his "History of the Christian Church," 
"a great ethical system, yet not without 
claims to Ix considered a religion. . . 
The source of all, and the shaping, har- 
monizing inrtuence in the universe is the 
vital warmth, from which all has ele- 
veloped by dilfering elegrees of tension, 
which interixnetrates all things, anel lo 
which all will return ... it is the intelli- 
gent, sclf-conse ious world-soul, an all in- 
dwelling reason, Logos, of which our 
reason is a i)art. It is God, the life and 
wiselom of all. It is truly within us. We 
can 'follow the Cmh\ within,' and by 
reason of it one can say, as Clcanthes did 
of Zeus: 'We too are thy offspring.' The 
popular goels are simply names for the 
forces that stream out from Gexl. 

"Since one wisdom exists in all the 
world, there is one natural law, one rule 
of conduct for all men. All are morally 
free. Since all are from God, all men are 
brothers. Differences in station in life 
are accidental. To follow reason in the 
place in which one finds oneself is the 
highest duty, and is equally praiseworthy 
whether a man is an Emj)eror or a slave. 
So to olx-y reason, the Logos, is the sr)le 
object of pursuit. Happiness is no just 
aim, though duty done brings a certain 
happiness purely as a by-product. The 
chief enemies of a perfect obedience arc 
jjassions and lusts, which pervert the 
judgment. These must resolutely be put 
aside. God inspires all geKxl acts, though 
the notion of God is essentially panthe- 
istic. 

The Ethics of Stoicism 

"The strenuous ascetic attitude of 
Stoicism, its doctrine of the all-pervading 
and all-ruling tlivine wiselom, Logos, its 
insistance that all who do well are eejually 
deserving, whatever their station, and its 
assertion of the essential brotherhood of 
all men, were profoundly to affect Chris- 
tian theology. In its highest representa- 
tives the creed and its results we re noble. 
It was, however, tcjo often harel, narrow, 
and unsvmpathetic. It was for the few. 
It recognized that the many could never 
reach its standards. Its spirit was too 



often one of pride. That of Christianity 
is one of humdity. Still it produced re- 
markable effects. Stoicism gave Rome 
excellent emperors anel many lesser 
officials. Though it never became a 
really |X)pular creed, it was followeel by 
many of high inffuence and |K>sitiem in 
the Roman worlel, and modified Roman 
law for the better. It intreMluceel into 
jurisprudence the conception of a law of 
nature, expressed in reason, and above all 
arbitrary human statues. By its doctrine 
th.it all men are by nature ecpial, the 
worst features of slavery were gradually 
ameliorated, and Roman citizenship wide- 
ly extended. 

"One may say lh.it the- best edue'ated 
thought in Rome and ihc provinees, by 
the time of Christ, in spite of wiele- 
spre.id Epicureanism and Scepticism, in- 
clined to pantlu'istic Monolluism, te> the 
conce|>tion of (lod as geM>d, in contrast 
to the> non-moral character of the olel 
Gie-ek and Roman deities, to In-lief in a 
ruling divine providence, lo the thought 
that true religion is not ceremonies but 
an imitalion e)f the moral epialities of 
God, and towarel a humaner attituele to 
men." 
The Nature of the "Meditations" 

Such being, in geiier.d, the cree-d to 
which Marcus Aurelius gave so genuine 
an assent, lM>th in word and in ele-ed, let 
us pass at once to the "Thoughts" or the 
"Meditations" themselves — "the most 
human of all Ixxtks; ... a veritable etern- 
al gos|H'l, which will never grow olel," in 
Renan's opinion. 

The " 'Meditations,' which form e)ne of 
the most impressive, lorm also one of the 
truest lKK>ks in the whole range of re- 
ligious literature," writes Lecky. "They 
consist of rude fragmentary notes with- 
out literary skill or arrangement, written 
for the most |>art in hasty, broken, anel 
se)metimes almost unintelligible sentences 
amiel the turmoil of a camp. . ." In 
these "Meditatiems" we eliscover the 
serious and serupuloiisly e-onseieniious 
inepiiry of a human soul, examining its 
own e-oneluct and the principles by which 
that c oneluct must be regulated. In these 
"Meditations" we read the re-cord made 
by the Emperor at the close of a busy 
day in the- field with the legions as he 
e-ommune-d with him.self in the ejuie-t 
watches of the night and summoned him- 
self to give account of his ste-wardship 
l)efe>re the bar of an ete-rnal justiee. Here 
are the causes pleaded; here are the 
judgments renelered; here are the re- 
rtee-tieins on each case jotle-d down for his 
own use- and imprcj\enienl . 

The "Meditations" 

Hear him, as he confers with himself 
on the eternal verities. 

"Every moment think steadily as 
a Roman anel a tnan to do what thou 
hast in hand with perfect and simjile 
dignity, and feeling of affection, and 
freedom, anti justice, and to give 
thyself relief from all other thoughts. 
And thou wilt give thyself relief if 
thou doest every act of thy life as if 
it were the last, laying aside all care- 
lessness and passionate aversion from 
the commands of reason, and all 
hyjMxrisy, and self-love, and dis- 
content with the (X)rtion which has 
been given to thee. Thou seest how 
few the things are, the which if a 
man lays hold of, he is able to live a 
life which flows in quiet, and is like 
the existence of the gcxJs; for the 
gods on their {)art will require nothing 
more from him who observes these 
things." 

"Hipixxrates, after curing manv 
diseases, himself fell sick and died. 
The Chaldaei foretold the deaths of 
many, and then fate caught them 
too. Alexander and Pomjx'ius and 
Caius Caesar, after so often com- 
pletely destroying whole cities, and 
m battle cutting to pieces many ten 
thousands of cavalry and infantry, 
themsi-lves texj at last departed from 
life. Heraclitus, after so many specu- 
lations on the conflagration of the 
universe', was filled with water in- 
ternally and died smeared all over 
with mud. And lice destroyed Demo- 
critus; and other lice killed Socrates. 
What means all this? Thou hast em- 
barked, thou hast made the voyage, 
thou art come to shore; get out. If 
indeed to another life, there is no 
want of gods, not even there; but if 
to a state without sensation, thou 
wilt cease to tx> held by pains and 
pleasures, and to be a slave to the 
vessel, which is as much inferior as 
that which serves it is superior: for 
the one is intelligence and deity; the 
other is earth and corruption." 

"Never value anything as profit- 
able to thyself which shall comfxl 
thee to break thy promise, to lose thy 
self-respect, to hate any man, to 
suspect, to curse, to act the hytKxrite, 
to desire anything which needs walls 
and curtains: for he who has preferred 
to everything else his own intelligence 
and daemon and the worship of its 
excellence, acts no tragic part, docs 
not groan, will not need either soli- 
tude or much company; and, what is 
chief of all, he will live without 
cither pursuing or flying from (death); 
but whether for a longer or a shorter 



Profs. Julian and Coding 
Discuss Wagner's "Parsifal" 




PROF. ARTHUR N. JULIAN 



NEW YORK PIHLIIARMONIC 

SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Moziirt's symphony in D major, De- 
bussey's "lln-ria," (ioldmark's conccilo 
for the violin in A minor, and Straus' 
"Till Eulens|H-igel" will comprise- t he- 
program of the New N'ork Pbilharmonie 
Symphony Orchestra for ne-xt Sund.iy, 
February 5. Bruno Waller is eondiic ling 
the orchestra with Nathan Nilslein as 
solo violinist. The- |)rogram nuiy Ik- 
heard on the radio in the Memorial 
building. 



time he shall have the se>ul enclosed 
in the body, he cares not at all: for 
even if he must ele|)art immediately, 
he will go as reaelily as if he were 
going to do anything else which can 
be done with decency anel order; 
taking c:are of this only all through 
life, tnat his thoughts turn not away 
fiwm anything which btdongs to an 
intelligent animal and a member of 
a civil community." 

"Such as are thy habitual thoughts, 
such alse> will Ix- the character of thy 
mind; for the sejul is dyeel by the 
thoughts. Dye it then with a con- 
tinuous series of such thoughts as 
these: for instance, that where a man 
can live, there he can also live well. 
But he must live in a |>alace; well 
then, he can also live well in a |ialae:e." 

"If any man is able to convince me 
and show me that 1 elo not think or 
act riuht, I will glady change; fejr I 
seek tne truth, by which no man was 
ever injured. But he is injure-el who 
abides in his error and ignorance." 

"The genls who are immortal arc- 
not vexed In-cause eluring so long a 
time they must tolerate continually 
men such as they are anel so many of 
them bad; and lx-sie|es this, they also 
take care of them in all ways. But 
theju, who art destined le) enel so sex)n, 
art thou wearieel of enduring the bad, 
and this too when thou art one of 
them? 

"It is a ridiculous thing for a man 
not to fly from his own badness, 
which is indecei (x>ssible, but to fly 
from other men's badness, whieh is 
imix>ssible." 

"When thou art tre)ubleel alKiUt 
anything, thou ha.st forgotten this, 
that all things happen according to 
the universal nature; anel forgotten 

(Conanuad on PM« *, Column 2) 




PROF. STOWELL C. GODDING 



Literary and Musical 

Sources are Illustrated 

Showing the techni«|ue of Richard Wag- 
ner's "P.irsifal" and revc-aling its le-ge-nd- 
ary sources. Professor Arthur Julian of 
the (•ernian department and Pre»fe8»or 
Stowc-11 ( ioding of the- Fre-mh depart- 
ment eoiiside-re-d the- literary and musical 
structure of the o|M-ra at the- language and 
literature- me-eting last evening. Phoiio- 
gra|)hic records of the- last act of "Parsi- 
lal" were played lo supple ine-nt the dis- 
cussion. 

Professor Julian dememstrated that 
Wagner tcMik I hi- llii-me- oi his opera from 
"Parsifal," an epic imm-iii e»f nearly 25,(XK) 
lines com|M(se-cl by Wolfiani von E.sc hc-n- 
bac h, a knight |m>c I , in the- l.'illi century. 
"Wolfram's |NH-m contains the- (usieni of 
the- Ic'^e-nd of the Holy Grail with its 
dee-ply mystic alspiril Iial symlMilism, the 
legend of King Arthur anel the lege-nd of 
the- We-lsh Perc-cliir." Wagiic-r, in his 
adapt itt ion of the the-mc- uf this old e-pic, 
(lid not follow il close-ly. He used only a 
(Contlnuod on PaA* 4. Column 3) 

TURKISH STUDENT 

STUDIES AMERICANS 

Falih Nazml Ce>nimentH on American 
Life 



That American life is characterizcel by 
very nmch hustling and e-fliciency, and 
tcK) much tensi-ness and rest le-ssne-ss, is 
the- opinion of Falih Nazmi, Turkish 
student, ne>w doing graeluate work in 
chemistry. Mr. Nazmi is a graduate of 
the Intc-rnalional College-, .in American 
institution, leH-aled in Izmir, Turkey. 

Allot lic-r intere-sting observation which 
Mr. Nazmi made was that American 
citizens, es|N;cialiy students, |)ay much 
more- attention lo ri-ligie)n than do thc- 
average- citizens or sludenls of Turkey. 
His comments u(>on Ameriean life were 
not in the- nature- of a elelil>e-rate criti- 
cism, but w<-re- obser\'ations u|K>fi the 
(Contlnuoil on Pago 4, Column 4) 



POEM OF THE MONTH 



ON THE UNCERTAINTIES OF LIFE 

Tej epiestie)n, as ji cliijil with se-arc liing i-yi-s 

Exclaims in woneler of I he- lovely rcjsc-; 

What mighty |K)wer lic-s hiel in earth or skies. 

From whence clese-enels this love-ly thing that grows? 

To marvel, .is a youth wiih e herishccl ho|M-s 

Exults triumphant in a wc 1 1 -earned name-; 

Who glories in the- joy and grief of strife-, 

A guileless vie tim of the- ge»<ldess Fame. 

To (Minder, as an e>ld man bent with care 

Seeks lemgingly feir epiietude anel |x;iee; 

What hapi)iness is left for him to share-. 

What fate ensues when life- on earth shall c ease? 

Of Life we ask but these three things aleme. 

And find no answer save our humble own. 

A"thor: Eelith Parsems '36 
Juelge: Miss Be-.iman 

The DeeemlK-r [xje-m of the- mejnth was acr iek-ntally niis- 
placeei in the process of editing, but will probably ap|Mfar 
within two or three weeks. Manuscripts for the February 
contest must be left with Mr. Rand by the 15th of the 
month. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1933 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1933 



(Blcaninos 



(NSFA) 
Nijtwitlislaiuling the tiepreshion, which 
is still thriviiijj in these parts, there are 
41 tars re^jistercd for use this year at the 
lean's nrtHe. ihis repr<strits an in- 
crease of one o\«M till- ninnber rej^islered 
last \iar, and means thai an avera^-e of 
one out of ever\ hfieeii Weslevan men 
maintains a ear. Wesleyun Ar^us 

After in inn eUj-^ed for sevenne.i vear^-, 
Chicago's "Iner eolie>;e" is n^.nix opened, 
with students at work over texlliooks and 
in the lalx.ratory. The Wahl-llenius 
Institute of Fermentation started its lir^l 
term siiuc HM') with 1'.) students ifi 
aitendante. In an opttiinn ad-lress to 
his students. President Max lleniiis said: 
"What has tin- futurr in store for us? 
The revival of the hnwin^; in<lustry in 
the United States." Courses in eliemis- 
try, hacteriolo^jy, yeast jultiire an<l re- 
frigeration are on the eurrii iilum. 

Rtng-Tu»i-l'iii 

Co-eds at the University of California 
are allowed to sta\ out till 2.15 every 
ninht of the year, eMtpt the "Hij; Came" 
night, when there are no rules. 

~ -Sivarthmore Phoenix 

Aceordinn to mid-tcrni reixjris |>osted 
at the registrar's office recently, HCiO 
w/niversity of North Carolina students 
are failing their work thus far this (piarter. 
The nunilM r of warning marks is recorded 
out of a student Itody of approximately 
2800. -/^<ii7v Tiirlhrl 

A student who graduated from Orison 
State in ';{2 made the highest |K>ssil)le 
gratles in all subjects for »leven consecu- 
tive terms.- Barometer. 



Sus|Hnded from the University of 
Maryland because of his refusal to take 
the military training course, Knnis CoaU-, 
of Bel Aire, Md., hasept it ioned t he regents 
of the school for reinstatement. Shoidd 
his jHtition be turned down, Coale plans 
to take legal action.— .■1m//j<'M<i«'W»' 

The "dating bureau" is a nourishing 
institution at Arkansas Polytechnic lol- 
lege. The bureau has a scale of prices, 
and fees are in accordance with the de- 
sirability of the date secured for the 
subscriber. Men or women anxious to 
ntake an engagement must submit four 
names in the onler of their choice. If 
the (later gets his first »hoice it costs hin> 
25 cents. Second choice costs 20 cents, 
third choice 15 cents and fourth choice 
the bargain price of 10 cents. 

— Okhihonid Daily 

Sinclair Lewis showed an audience in a 
lecture how to write a great American 
novel. We hope they will <lo as much for 
him some day. — llanard Lampoon 

"I deplore the lack of intelligence as 
compared with the over-production of 
intellect in America," siiyd Dr. Edward 
O. Sisson, jmifessor of i)hilosophy at 
Reed College and former president of the 
University of Montana. — Idaho Argonaut 

"More people have died from drinking 
tuberculosis milk than from tirinking 
whiskey, but I do not therefore wish to 
prohibit cows," sa>d A. McQuisten, 
MentlK-r of Parliament. — Technique. 

Silverware from the Stanford Univer- 
sity dining room continues to flisapiaar 
although |x)lice ix-rifMlically comb fra- 
ternities for the missing articles. Scinie of 
the tableware has been discovered in the 
dining hall of a New England college, and 
some in China. — Swarthmore Phoenix 

At Northwestern University co-eds 
who want to remain faithful to far-away 
loves have organized and will refuse all 
dates with students. The men have re- 
taliated with a similar organizjition, the 
members of which wear a bit of black 
crepe. — Lehigh Brmvn and White. 

"If 1 were a dictator and could in one 
fell swoop abolish the existing educational 
institutions I would require everyone to 
go through two procedures: first, to 
learn to sjx^ak and read the English 
language and, secondly, to study social 
science. Then he would be free to study 
what he pleased," stated Dr. Donnal V. 
Smith, assistant professor of history at 
New York State College for Teachers. 
— State College News 

Due to a surprising increase in enroll- 
ment at Louisiana Tech, certain students 
at the institution arc being deprived of 
the privilege of attending assembly pro- 
grams for the next three months. The 
auditorium just won't hold them all. 

—Duke Chronicle 



AGORA 

(Continued from Paft* i) 

this, that a man's wrongful act is 
nothing to thee; and further thou 
hast forgotten this, that everything 
which happens, always happened so 
and will happen so, and now happens 
so everywhere; forgotten this too, 
how close is the kinship between a 
man and the whole human race, for 
it is a community, not of a little 
blood or seed, but of intelligence. 
And thou hast forgotten this too, 
that every man's intelligence is a 
god and is an efflux of the Deity; and 
Forgotten this, that nothing is a man's 
own, but that his child and his body 
and his very soul came from the 
Deity; forgotten this, that everything 
is opinion; and lastly thou hast for- 
gotten that every man lives the 
present time only, and loses only 
this." 

"Constantly bring to thy recollec- 
tion those who have complained 
greatly about anything, those who 
have l)een most conspicuous by the 
greatest fame or misfortunes or 
enmities or fortunes of any kind: 
then think where are they all now? 
Smoke and ash and a tale, or not 
even a tale. . . and in fine think of 
the eager pursuit of anything con- 
joined with pride; and how worthless 
everything is after which men vio- 
lently strain; and how much more 
philosophical it is for a man in the 
opjxirt unities presented to him to 
show himself just, temi)erate, obedi- 
ent to the gods, and to do this with 
all simplicity: for the pride which is 
proud of its want of pride is the most 
Intolerable of all." 

"What dost thou wish, — to con- 
tinue to exist? Well, dost thou wish 
to have sensation, movement, growth, 
and then again to cease to grow, to 
use thy speech, to think? What is 
there of all these things which seems 
to thee worth desiring? But if it is 
easy to set little value on all these 
things, turn to that which remains, 
which is to follow reason and Go<l. 
But it is inconsistent with honoring 
reason and God to be troubled be- 
cause by death a man will be de- 
prived of the other things." 

"Man, thou hast been a citizen in 
this great state Ithe world); what 
difference does it make to thee 
whether for five years (or three]? for 
that which is conformable to the 
laws is just for all. Where is the 
hardship then, if no tyrant nor yet 
an unjust judge sends thee away from 
the state, but nature, who brought 
thee into it? the same as if a praetor 
who has employed an actor dismisses 
him from the stagc.^ — 'But I have not 
finished the five acts, but only three 
of them.' — Thou sayest well, but in 
life the three acts are the whole 
drama; for what shall be a complete 
drama is determined by him who was 
once the cause of its composition, 
and now of its dissolution: but thou 
art the cause of neither. Depart 
then satisfied, for he also who re- 
leases thee is satisfied." 



RIOTING MARKS OPENING 

OF EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES 



Political ChaoH and Unemployment 
Cause Outbreaks in Germany, 
Austria and Poland 



Aurelius' Message to Our Age 

Antl now, what in view of that life 
and its record, is our judgment of Marcus 
Aurelius? And what, moreover, has 
Marcus Aurelius to say to us and our 
age; our age, in some ways, so like his 
own, in others, so unlike? 

First, can we make the acquaintance 
of this noble soul and still maintain that 
our vision of the tinalities of life has not 
been enlarged? Can we come to know 
this man of whom it has been s;iid, "The 
Stoic philosophy which required that the 
sage should be indifferent to worldly 
goods found its crowning exemplar in a 
sage who posses»it'd them all" — can we 
know this man, I say, and not feel the 
inspiration that radiates from his life? 
Can we close such a volume as the 
"Meditations" without perceiving that 
in these communings of the Emperor 
with himself there is something close to 
the divine? If, then, we do respond to a 
sense of the godlike in this ancient 
philosopher; if we do, in a measure, 
catch sotnething of that resignation to the 
Universal Will which is so vital to Stoic 
thought and which the great prayer of 
Jesus so truly expresses, then verily are 
we ready to penetrate to the secret of 
this Roman's life, a secret set forth in 
lines dear to Marcus himself: 

"O Zeus and Destiny 'tis yours to lead; 
I follow gladly by the path decreed; 
And though reluctant were my coward will, 
I none the less should have to follow still." 

Finally, can we of this smug and com- 
placent and comfortable age miss the 
stern rebuke which the thinking of the 
great Emj^eror carries across the cen- 
turies to us? Listen, then, to the reproof 
as given with the conunent of my old 
teacher, Walter Goodnow Everett, who 
writes concerning the implication of all 
Stoic thought: "When luxury and plea- 
sure-seeking alwund; when physical pain 
has come to be regarded by many as the 
greatest of ills; when prudence and safety 
are exalted as the chief practical virtues, 
and often mean, alas! little more than 
rules for material success; when it is 
demanded that religion must alujve all 
else be comforting; when even philosophy, 



New York, N.Y. (NSFA)— Disorders 
in universuies of Europe, often taking the 
form of anti-Semitic rioting has cost the 
lives of several persons, and the injury 
of liun<lreds more, according to the bulle- 
tin of the International Student Service 
at Geneva. "The opening of the aca- 
demic year has been so frequently the 
occasion of violent disorders in the uni- 
versities that they have almost cotne to 
be regarded as normal, and have ceased 
to attract the reprobation which they 
undoubtedly deserve. This year, far 
from Ixing an exception, has seen serious 
trouble in Germany, Austria, Hungary, 
Poland and Roumania, disorders begin- 
ning from student groups in which 
several persons have lost their lives and 
several hundred have Iwen injured. 

In Vienna rioting started in the Uni- 
versity and Technical High School in 
October, between National Socialists and 
Socialists, which soon turned into an 
attack on Jewish students. The Univer- 
sity ha<l to be closed for three days, and 
when it was reopened formal complaints 
were made by the Minister of the United 
States and other countries to the Chan- 
cellor because of injuries to foreign stud- 
ents. Since then there has been further 
rioting, this time between National 
Socialists and Catholic student organi- 
ziitions. 

In Leipzig one of ihe most distinguished 
professors of sociology, Professor Kessler, 
published an article attacking the Na- 
tional Socialists, and local members of 
the group tried several times to break up 
his lectures. Order was finally restored 
only by the intervention of the Rector 
of the University. 

Very serious anti-Semitic riots in 
Poland, for which University students 
are resiK)nsible, are reported in the 
bulletin, and also in Opinion, a Journal 
of Jewish Life and Letters. Rioting in 
the Universities spread to the Jewish 
quarter of Warsaw and many jieople were 
seriously injured. On the 2t»th of Novem- 
ber a Polish student was killed in a brawl, 
and his death was made the excuse for 
widespread rioting, which has not yet 
been permanently sulnlued. 

The main causes for these disorders 
according to the l.S.S. Bulletin, are the 
|X)litical unrest and uncertainty all over 
Euro|H', and the very serious unemploy- 
ment situation among recent university 
graduates. This results in attemirts to 
discriminate against minority groui)s like 
the Jews, as well as in party clashes in 
the universities themselves. 

Rather ironically, the latest bulletin 
of the National Union of Students of 
Czechoslovakia praises the success of last 
sunnner's Congress of the International 
Confederation of Students at Riga, and 
adds, "In this time of general crisis, the 
students have set the example of unity." 
A conference of Polish and Czechoslo- 
vakian students held late this autumn at 
Varsovia was very successful in builtling 
up friendly relations between the student 
unions of the two countries. It is to be 
ho|H»d that the good feeling which was 
marked among students of different na- 
tionalities may find some place within 
the universities themselves. 



HUGH P. BAKER BECOMES 

ELEVENTH PRESIDENT TODAY 
(CrattaiMd from Pag* 1) 

Yale and Doctor of Economics from 
Munich. At the completion of his studies 
he travelled for ten years for the United 
States Forestry Service as inspector and 
administrator of public domains. In 1904 
he organized the department of forestry 
at Iowa State College and remained 
Professor there until 1907 when he 
accepted a similar position at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. In 1912 he was 
asked to organize the New York State 
College of Forestry at Syracuse. He was 
dean of that college until 1920 except for 
a period of several months during the 
war when he served in the infantry and 
on the Army War Staff. 

In 1920 he left Syracuse and for eight 
years he was executive secretary to the 
American Pulp and Paper Association 
and for two years manager of the trade 
department of the United States Chamber 
of Commerce. He returned to his posi- 
tion as Dean of the College of Forestry 
at Syracuse in 19.30. 

President Baker is as well known as an 
educator, as a forester, and atlministrator. 
Several years ago in a conversation with 
a former president of this college, he 
declared: ". . . these schools of forestry 
and agriculture that we are running are 
actually the best colleges in the country, 
and some da> I'm going to step out and 
prove it." 

In a recent article concerning President 
Baker an associate wrote: "Baker has 
proved the possessor of a vital personality 
and an aggressive leadership. He has 
shown exceptional capacity to win jxjpular 
support to the institutions under his 
direction. His exjjerience at the College 
of Forestry and his varied and successful 
experience in the fields of education and 
business qualify him exceptionally well 
for the presiilency of Massachusetts State 
College." 

The date of President Baker's inaugu- 
ration has not been determined as yet. 
It is expected to be in the latter part of 
the spring term, or in the earlier fart of 
the first semester next year. 



FACULTY INTERVENTION 

DEPENDED BY PRESIDENT 
OF CITY COLLEGE OF N. Y. 



as interpreted by many, must be made 
to yield us reasons for what we desire to 
believe --in such an age we may well be 
reminded of their (Stoic philosophers'] 
more heroic view of life. The message 
of . . . Marcus Aurelius is the message of 
a brave idealism. It declares that we 
must submit ourselves without reserve 
to the divine order as it appears in nature 
and in human society. This law is not 
to be found in our moods and impulses, 
in the feelings and emotions that come 
and go. It is a law of reason, to be dis- 
cerned only by intelligence, a spark of 
which human beings all share as their 
birthright." 

Walter E. Prince 



LITERARY AND MUSICAL 

SOURCES ARE ILLUSTRATED 
(Continued from Pna* 3) 

few of the dramatic incidents and his 
characterization of women differs from 
that of the old poem. Nevertheless he 
retained its spiritual significance. 

Wagner composed "Parsifal" in an 
evolutionary manner. He first wrote the 
story of the poem in prose out of which 
he made an epic poem; then he trans- 



TURKISH STUDENT 

STUDIES AMERICANS 
(Continued from Pafte 3) 

American temperament which differs so 
widely from that of his own people. 

Until the last eight or nine years, 
Turkey has been a dormant country, its 
I)eople not realizing their potential power. 
Turkey under Greece and the Sultanate 
was the Turkey of the past ages; its 
people were honest, frugal, peaceful, but 
not vigorous because individuality had 
been denied them. The national charac- 
ter was one of a slow-moving populace 
whose kindness and peaceableness could 
not be denied, but whose indifference to 
their work could not be disputed, either. 
The new republic has been in existence 
approximately ten years, and under the 
skillful and dominating leadership of 
Mustapha Ghazi, Turkey is rapidly be- 
coming modernized. The people are 
heart and soul for their leader. An 
example of the new seriousness and vigor 
which has come over the people is evi- 
denced in the fact that between 750,000 
and 850,000 people out of a population 
of 14,000,000 are attending night school 
annually. One of the greatest contribut- 
ing factors to this new zest for learning is 
attributable to the change from the 
Arabic letters and figures to the Latin. 

When questioned as to why he thought 
Americans were more gravely concerned 
over religion than the Turks, Nazmi said 
that the average Turk took his religion 
as a matter of course. "There is no doubt 
in the mind of the Turk as to the authen- 
ticity of his religion or as to its value in 
spiritual guidance," he stated. In com- 
parison with worship in Turkey, Ameri- 
can worship seems ostentatious, artificial; 
it lacks the simplicity, the heart-felt ease 
and dignity of the Moslem at his Mosque. 
There are no sects in Turkey in the sense 
that we have a Catholic and Protestant 
sects in this country. Charity, kindness 
and fellowship are the basis of the Moslem 
religion and when one fulfills these obli- 
gations, one satisfies the demands of his 
religion. 



New York, N.Y. (NSFA)— The recint 
student demonstrations on the campu^s 
of the College of the City of New York 
and of New York University have rai.Md 
again the issue of how far college authuri- 
ties should control undergraduate activi- 
ties. In the New York Times of Octoln r 
30, two college presidents state op|xjsiii^ 
views on this c]uestion. 

Frederick B. Robinson, President of 
City College, believes that faculty su|iir- 
vision and guidance are necessary lo 
avoid more serious penalties. He says 
in part: "Clearly our trustees, likf 
others, recognize that they are responsiljji' 
to the public, jjarents and to the siudenis 
themselves for all that goes on under the 
college name. They cannot shirk final 
responsibility nor do they seek to do so 
While granting the students a generous 
range of freedom in which to exerci^t- 
initiative and self-control, they restr\e 
the right to modify practices which in 
their judgment require modification. 

"Undergraduates are beset with liic 
storm and stress of adolescence and youii)^ 
manhood and their impulses thounh 
usually altruistic are often basetl on 
partial information and spring from in- 
experience and undue emotion. 

"If left wholly without faculty advice, 
guidance and ultimate control the ;iih- 
letes would neglect their studies and lor 
the joys of victories on the fields of s|)ort 
sacrifice future victories of science, letti r> 
and civic progress; undergraduate imii- 
Ushers would contract debts which others 
would have to pay anil bring dis<n(lit 
upon themselves and their colleges Ky 
overstepping the bounds of decent jour- 
nalism; discussion groups wouhl becoiiit 
the catspaws of outside agitators and 
embroil the college in matters foreign to 
the purpose of its foundation. All ex- 
perienced educators recognize these dan- 
gers and consider it their duty to sad- 
guard against them." 

President Rolxrt D. Leigh of Benninj;- 
ton College htdtls the op|K)site view. 

"The inescapable fact with regard to 
acatlemic devices of suppression is that 
they do not suppress," he declares. "In- 
deed, the effect U[)on students is strangely 
perverse — as perverse as that upon 
naughty chihlren when punished by iratt 
parents. To forbid student publication 
is to increase the reading and discussion 
of the thing forbidden. To prohibit stu- 
dent assemblies or to pronounce a taliu 
on subjects or si)eakers is to drive them 
not even untlerground but across the 
street into a bigger hall with a larger and 
more attentive audience. 

"It requires not much insight to sti- 
that in a world of newsf)apers, magazine s 
books, radio, movies and endless puMir 
talk it is impossible to keep the co\h%i- 
student from access to the new, tht 
bizarre, the fanatical, the dark and 
ignorant criticisms, the bright and fra^di 
Utopias of our time. In the interest of 
sound thinking, the development <»( 
critical judgment and of a sense of values 
they should certainly have that access. 

"Where more harmlessly than in the 
cool academic groves can the steam ol 
protest and discontent escape? 

"Suppress protests and bizarre notions, 
hide them intloors, send them outside tht 
campus walls, and they immetliately In- 
come glamourous and important far bt- 
yond their desert. Give them a free and 
normal part in the life of the college and 
they will serve as source material for de- 
velopment of mature thinking and fof 
judgment freed from the emotional rt- 
sults of childish protests, fears ami an- 
tagonisms. Clearly, freedom and toler- 
ance in these matters lead to a sounder 
educational resuU than the necessardy 
futile and dramatic combats rcsultms 
from authoritarian censorship.' 



cribed the poem into the words antl 
music of the opera. " 'Parsifal' as 
Wagner called it," Professor Coding ex- 
plained, "is the last and the greatest of 
Wagner's operas. It was his wish that 
this opera should never be a part of the 
repertoire of any other company than 
his own at Bayreuth. In his own words 
he wishes it 'to remain a stage-consecrat- 



ing festival drama' played only at hi:; 
festival theatre at Bayreuth." 

Wagner matle his orchestral music of 
equal importance with all the other 
elements of the opera, that is singing. 
stage setting, costumes, and story, n*" 
used his own inventitm of "making the 
trend of the music depend utK)n the 
action." Each character antl situation 
in the drama has its counterpart in the 
musical score, and the story is told com- 
pletely by the music. 

The latter part of the last act '• 
"Parsifal" was played on the phonograP' 
The recordings were by the Ber i" 
Symphony Orchestra conducted by 
Karl Much and the state opera chl>ru^e> 



SPORTS 



State Trounces Amherst 
Engineers Here Friday 



CAMBRIDGE SEXTET 

HA S POO R SEASON 

Coach "Red" Ball's hockey team is 
slated to play two games this week, 
M I.T. here Fritlay antl Hamilton at 
Clinton on Sitturday. A third game, 
which was to be played tt)day against 
Northeastern at Boston, was cancelled 
kcause the Boston Arena authorities 
have scheduled boxing bouts ft)r tonight 
and therefore no ice would be available 
l„r the game. 

Friday, Coach Vic Duplin will bring 
his Tech skaters to this campus for the 
first lime in several years. The Engineers 
have not been very successful so far this 
wintir as they have Ix-en stacketl up 
ai;ainst teams out of their class. In their 
tirsl game, Harvartl trouncetl Tech, U-1, 
and Vale followetl Harvard's lead by 
duplicating the score over Tech. The 
Cambridge team received a third set- 
lack from Big Three op|K)sition when 
i'rimeton won .'i-l. In all of these games 
iIr. work of goalie Milliken has Iwen 
outstanding. The scores would h.ive 
JK-cn much greater if it were not for the 
brilliant goal guarding t)f the pint-sized 
goalie. In the Princeton game alone, 
Miilikcii made 2K difficult saves to keep 
his team in the running. Against H.IJ., 
whi(h defeated Tech C-1, Milliken kept 
u|) \n- >;reat playing and against North- 
easurn his team-mates, encouragetl by 
his wonderful saves, Ijegan to clock to- 
gether antl tlefeatetl the Huskies 5-;i for 
thtir first win t)f the season. M.LT.'s 
prob-ihle lineup against State will include 
Milliken in the strings. Captain Hrtjnes 
.11 renter, the veteran Tht)miison at left 
wing and a s|)eetly sophomore, Williams, 
at right wing. .■\nother sophomore 
Svlvester, who has hatl a year's exjurience 
with the Union Bt)at Club, will hold 
down the tlefense positions with Mathias. 
.\s yet the calibre of the Hamilton 
College ice team is unknown. All t)f its 
games to tiate have Ix^en t:ancelletl be- 
cause of the lack of ice. Continuetl warm 
wt.ither has made it inqjossible to holil 
anv praitice sessitms and it will Ik- an 
im x|Hrienced team that will face the 

M iruon and White this Siiturtlay. 



MAROON AND WHITE 
DEFEAT TOWN RIVALS 

Led by Captain Dick llammontl, 
Ma.ss;uhusetts State C\jllege hotkey team 
had little tlilliiulty in tiefeating .XmlurM 
7-0 last Wednestlay t)n the College |H)nd. 
The Jeffmen clearly sht)we;l their lack t)f 
practice anil never seriously threalenetl 
the State goal. Frequent |)enalties antl 
the soft playing surfaie further slowetl 
up the game between the town rivals. 

During the first minute of the game, 
HammtMid was sent oJf the iie ftir illegal 
checking. Inmiediately on his return to 
the game, Dick retfi\etl a neat jwss in 
front of the .\ndierst cage from Bill 
Brown antl shot the puck |)ast the goalie 
for the only score of the jjeritxl. Most of 
the action was in ,\mherst territt)ry with 
the Sid)rinas playing a (lefensi\e game. 
()\ereagerness to sct>re i)reventetl more 
State tallies and (ireene, Amherst goalie, 
was kei)t busy clearing the puck away 
from the oi>enin^ of his net. 

With only five .'\ndiersl men on the ice 
llammontl, unassistetl, scoreil his second 
goal to o|>en up the second [M-ritul. This 
was t losely followed by another on a 
ct)mbination play with Snow tlenting the 
strings after a pass frt>m Cain. Amherst 
lacked teamwork and their soltj dashes 
were either brt)ken up by the State for- 
wards or were stoppe<l siiddetdy by .\rt 
Brown, Hammond, or HIackbtirn at de- 
fense-. During a melee in front of the 
Sabrina gtjal, .Snow calmly iK>ked the 
rubl)er intt) the net to make the count 
4-0. Ct)ach "Red" Ball insertetl a ihinl 
line of Clancy, Shaffner and Wihry at 
this stage of the game and the play 
o|Hnetl up a little with .'\mliers( making 
vain attempts to sct)re. Two fM-nalties 
sfK)n left only four St.ite men «»n the ice 
antl to chet k the I'ptowners sudden 
attack, "Red" Ball sent in Cain, who by 
his clever stick-handling and fa>t >kating 
outmantjeuvered the entire l-ortl Jell 
team until his team-males were allowetl 
to resume play. 

On the first play of the thirtl [K-riotl, 
Cain, on an assist from Corctiran, t halked 
up his first score of the gaine. Stnm 
after, taking the puck in mitl-ice, Cain 



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Graduate of New England Conservatory 

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TEACHER of PIANO and ORGAN 
123 Main St. Tel. 67-J Amherst, Mass. 



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New Square Leads 25c 

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SPORTS CALENDAR 



WtMlnesday, February 1 

S.'M pan. IiUerfruternity sport!*, Thela fhi 
vs. Non-lrateriiily 
Thursday, February i 

K.:H) |) III. Iiitftt'nitiTiiity siK)rtr<, Kappa 

Siutiia vs. U.T.N'. 
9.1;') pill. SiKina Phi Epxilun vs. Non- 
Kraleriiity 
Saturday. February 4 

V.irsity lliickcy. Ilaiuiltun at C'liiitoii 
Wirsity Huskflb.ill, llaiiiiUdii u( eiiiUuii 
\'ui-lty Trai k. Hi)ston Univ. at lio:jtun 
Tuenday, February 7 

Inlcrfraternity 8|K>r(s, Track iiiet't in cagi- 
y.T.V. vs. Theta Chi at ».00 pin. 



^^^^X|><{^<{^«t|^«{^«{|*<^<{^<^ 



^ 



Cbru tbe "knot l5olc 



* 



riii> colunniist says: 
Hamilton is an unknown (|u.inlity. . . 
Phi .Sig and Delta Phi arc U.iding I heir 
respect i\c \olle>liall leagues while Sig 
ICp and l.andxia Chi top i he liaskcl- 
halUrs. . . Johimy Coiisol.itii, K.ipp.t Ep, 
is lea<ling the fraternity scorers with 24 
points. . . Hill Mtillcr, l..iinl)d,t Chi, and 
Joe Coliurii, K.ippa Sig, arc in sicond and 
third places, respectively. . . Harold Kid 
tior»', head ad\isor\' coach at .State, is 
writing interestingK' and ix|Hrtly on 
sch(M)llH>y baskitliall in a (olunm "Com- 
ments on Haskethall" for (he Springtield 
I'nion. . . A Springtield s|xirts writer 
Siiys "One of the outstanding features of 
(he State placing is Lojko's pep talk to 
himself while preparing to toss a free 
try. lie eiu (lur-i^es himself in rapid lire 
conversiition. One observir states ih«' 
following monoldnue l>\ l,<iiko: Come on, 
l.ojko old IxiN'. \'ou h.ix'e ni.iile 40;,' of 
your free tries. If you make this om' 
>ou'll haxf a CtO'J a\erage. .Mi, then- it 
is, another one.". . . Tlu- IMK) fans who 
atten<led the Williams game last week 
s;iw Loll Mush set a nc-w fold shooting 
record for the Cage, the state star making 
g«>od eight of ten free tries. . . Another 
excerpt from the Springtield Union: "In 
charg«' of varsity f(M)tl)all .it Massai hii- 
setts. State is an alert younj; fellow, Melvin 
TaulM', who <loes his own thinking. He 
is not oiu' to accept the validity of state- 
ments until he has |HTsonally .in.ilyze«l 
them. Thus an opinion from him tarries 
weight, because behind Mel's s|)oken 
word lies concent r.itecl thought.". . . . 
Lou Bush is leading the Slate scorers 
with 74 |M»ints. Lojko has scored Tu 
[Hunts while Hoiiran has accounted for 
.•{(I [Kjints. . . The Ellertmen have 219 
(Mjints lo their op|K»iients' 240. . . That 
Andierst victory over Springfiehl was a 
great surprise. . . Bob Hanson, utilit> 
forward, will Ik* out of the game for some 
time iK'cause of a brf)ken Imjuc- in his 
hand. . . Lou Bush is the first back to Im- 
c lecte»l captain of the State football 
team in five years. . . Ra> Mann '29, 
center; Tim Minksleiii ':{0, tackh-; Cliff 
Foskett ':{1, tackle; and Dan Leary '.i2, 
center have- held the- |>revious captain- 
cies. . . Of the last five MarcMin and While 
football captains, three have l»een Sig 
Eps and two were memlHrs of Q.T.V. . . 
There is a marked absenc e of prep s( hcud 
athletes at Massjic husi-tts State. ()nl> 
three on this year's hocn) scpiacl at t ended 
a (mparatory sc hool: Bush at Wrmont 
.\( .idctiiy, Houran at Gushing Academy 
and Sheff at Lynbrookc- Prep on Long j 
Island. . . Things gc»t so baci in the Frosh- I 
Turners Falls game that the l!t.'{<l hoop 
manager had to go in at forward. . . I he 
greatest expense of the hcM key team this 
season has been the price of telegrams 
cancelling hmkej Raines. . . Interest in 
s|X)rts should be more- keen if St.ite was 
in a collegiate league. Woiilcln't Mass. 
State, Vermont, .New Hampshire, Tuft.-.. 
Springtielcl and Worccste r Tec h make a 

well-balanced basketball league? 

Sigma Beta Chi licat Lamlwla Delta Mu 
in basketball, 'M-'i'). . . Too bad the ski 
carnival at Grecnfielel was called off. . . 
Pruync led the Slate seniors to victory 
in the intcrdass track meet. 



New Hampshire Wins; 
Leary Given High Honor 



m2 GRID LEADER 
RECEIVES POND MEDAL 

Because of his inspiration.il work in 
the role of the leader of (hi> Maroon .iiiil 
White grid fences during the past fall, 
and his general, all-.iround football 
•ibililN', Daniel J. Le.»r\ '.'{.'i was awareleil 
the .-Ml. Ill Leon Pciiiel Meillori.ll Meit.il 
in Insignia Chapel last Friela\ . ClilTeud 
l-'oskctt was .iwirdecj the' Pond Mccl.il 
last >e'ar while "Cy" Kimball renixcel 
the coveted honor in lU.'iO. 

Tlu' present. It ion of the iiu-cl.il to 
Daniel J. Leary by Dean William Mach 
mer, chairman of the athletic board, was 
the- feature of the Insignia Chapel. De-an 
.Vlaihiiur alsc) awarded \,irsit\ letter 
eertificates to the nienilMrs of the fiMit- 
ball, soccer and cross e-ouiitr\' leams at 
Massat husetts State for the past se.ison. 

The .Mian Leem Pond Memorial Medal 
which is given annually in tiiemory of 
Allan Leon Pond, c.ipt.iiii of football at 
.Slate ill lUlO, is .iw.irded on the basis of 
general excellent e in the grid game. On 
the ficiiit of the golil ineilal is engraved 
a footb.ill pla>cr anci the seal of the 
college. The following wejrrls are en- 
gra\«'ci on the !iae k c,f the imelal: "IVcun 
Massachusetts .Stale College to Daniel 
Joseph Leary, Itt.'l.l, for footb.dl excelleiic-e, 
ill memory of .Mian Leon Pond, l<.»2()." 

Daniel J. Leary of Turneis Lall-, the 
winner of the Poncj iiiedal, the highest 
honor Massachusetts Stale College can 
confer ii|M)i> an athlete, is one of the most 
proiiiiiieiit and most popiil.ii ligures on 
cam|uis. Besides iK'iiig captain of the 
Maroon and While 1*.).'S2 footb.dl leain, 
Leary is a meinlN'r cd ihc S iiaie, the 
Aelelpliia, president cjf the Inte-rfraternit y 
Comic il, a eapt.iiii in the- K.O.T.C. unit 
.It .Si. lie, captain ol the seiiiin c lass, and 
an offtc tr in the- Sigma Phi Epsilon fra- 
ternity. 



AnihersI goal. Taking a relK>unci off >he 
iHiards in back of their net, Corcoran 
sneaked the put k annind the oiiist retched 
goalie to make his first goal of the season. 
The g.iiiie ended with Amherst trxing 
hard to score against State's third line 
and never getting iK-yond Hannnond antl 
A. Brown. 



WILDCATS AVENGE 
LAST YEAR'S DEFEAT 

.\fler amassing an earK le.id e»\tr the 
Wildcat tive, Coach Freddy Elhrt's 
Maroon .iml White basketeers could not 
rc'iH-l the second half rush of the N«"W 
Hampshire cpiintet and were defeated in 
.1 loiiselv-pl.iycd g.iiiie ,it Dmli.im on 
January 2«, 4(1-;{1. Lou Bush, the lead- 
ing scorer of tin- Massachiisel Is Slate* 
le, nil, led I lieM.iitioii .ilicl While olleiisive 
with li\e- baskets ,ind fenir fouls for a 
tot.il cil 11 pciimJs. The Nc'w H.impshire 
vie tor\ .ixt'iineil tor its defeat at the li.itids 
of Slate ill .Xmherst last year, 2.'f-21. 

The M.iiooii .md W hite five-, Ic-ej by l.eui 
Bush, -surged into a 12 U le.itl e-.uK in t he 
first half. I lowev«-r, t he \\ ililc .il offensive-, 
sl.uting slowly uradii.illy picked up 
iMomc-ntuni and at the- close of the first 
li.ill. New H.impshire was It-ading t he 
Massach use-Its team, 21-IS. 

During the se-cond half, the Wildcat 
liirw'.irds ran wild, scoring Iwenty-live 
|Miiiits while the- Elh-rlnit-n were able to 
ie-gis|er c-l«-\eil jHtiiils. Walker of Nc-w 
llamp-^hire, who had not scorecl during 
the first half, d|-op|H-d in live baskets for 
New ll.iinpsliiri- to li-ati tlie- Wildcat 
()oiiil-m.ike-rs. 

The- M.iriion and White b.isketball 
epiiiitel will invade New \'ork this we-ek, 
joiirnev iii^ to Clinloii to |il.i> Hamilton 
Colli-ge citi l-"ebni.ii> 4. Niitliinn ite-finite 
is known of the slre-ngth of the Hamilton 
te.im e-xc-ept tll.it the Ne-w N'orke rs have- 
aire. Illy g. lined se-\er.il vicloiies ove-r 
several northe-rn New York rivals. Last 
ye.ir, Mas>^achuse-tls Stale- defealcd Hani- 
iltciii in .\iiiliersi , 42 22. 



New liaiiipeihlre 

It I-. I'. 

t ;oiiiili-y,rf ;< II 

VViUiii.it )> O 

Swi. klas.lf II (I O 

I'rii/iiNk'ki.c 2 O 4 

1 atKiintki,!- ',t II 4 

Kiinston.t: (I (I 

Walker.rK ."i » 10 

Uiiiii-rs.O! (I O 

McKiniiy.lK 2 O 4 

Arni-<lri>nK.lK <* " 



Mana. Slate 

n. I 



Iloiiran.lK 

I'liKaril.iK 

Nawiir.rK 

Kawe:ett,c 

Seivem.c 

l»)ko.lf 

Shrff.lf 

Kiish.rf 



I'. 

I 2 4 

I () 2 

(I O O 

I O 2 

1 O 2 

2 1 5 

5 4 t4 



Man*. Slate Amherat 

Ili-iiry, Iw rw. Ttitiey 

Snow, I c. Thtmias 

('t)tri>ran, rw Iw, Owen 

A. Htown, Id rci. Fort 

llaiiiiiii>ntl, rtl lit, liallantine 

M<(iii<:kian, K g, (jreen 

S t)r<- Mass. State 7. Aiiilii-riit 0. 

MaH.s. Statt- dparct W. Hrowii, Ctanty, tain, 
VVility, S h.ilfiH-r, lilai kl>iirn, Sf|»»-rMki. 

Aiiihrrnt upari-H i'tniifriiy, Murphy, S htwiw 
felclt, Muon, RuilKi-r. 



Enter "The CoIlej5e Barber Shop" Contest 

"M" HI ILI)I.\(. 
BPZGINS TODAY — CASH VRV/AiS 



circled Amhers-t's forwards, split their 
defensemen and rifletl the i)uck past their 
unprotected goalie-. Tlie ice, cut up a 
great deal by the F>laying, made passing 
impossible during the remainder of the 
game and the contest assumeel the ap- 
pearance of a shinny game around the 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1933 



i 



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We are the authorized agents for A. G. SpauUling & Bros. Our athletic department is 
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THOMAS F. WALSH 



EDITORIALS 
(ContlniMd from Paft* 3) 

Kai li ( liaiiuf of admini^lr.itidii in an i'du( ational instilulion is likf tlic- end of a 
InU marine the iiia^ks arc ri-iiiovcd from ilic fares of the darners, and eaeh stcs his 
partner in his or her true li^jht, able to discern cleurly with whom he was (laming. 
The Stale ColU'Ke, today, chanjces partners for the ehventh time. We have tried, 
sketcliily and vaKiiel> to be sure, to evahiale the routriliutiotis of the hist ten |)resi- 
dents in terms of their interpretation of the Morrill Act, and have sten the sinnifi- 
cancc of each contribution to the present status of the (ollene. The nucleus ot our 
purjjose as an educational institution remains the same; the emphasis only has 
shifted ^;roun(l. We look to President Baker to elTect the conciliation. 

"THE 'MEDITATIONS' OF MARCUS AURELIUS" 

We feel that it is only the blind who cannot notice the newly -awakened interest 
of many of our students in those things which Mr. Prince, cpiotins Arnold, refers to 
as l)einK "in the spirit." The in( reasinn desire to partake of ihinj-s not purely tangible 
or practical is evident, to mention but a few of its indications, in the trends of the 
extra-curricula activities of our students, in the record attendames at the lectures 
sf)onsor«<l by the dei)artmenl of I.annuajjes and Literature, and (he thought -provok- 
ing connnunications to the L'ollci^iuu's "Agora." 

It is with this in mind, with the knowledge that there are serious students of life 
on this campus to whom the formulation of a philos<j|)hy of living is not only a de- 
sirability but a vital necessity, that we submit IVofessor Prince's interpretation of 
the stoical <lo<trine as it is embodied in the "Meditations" of Marcus Aurelius. Cer- 
tainly, in terms of everyday nteds, this messiige of a "brave idealism." this ethical 
doctrine in which the control of life's functions is by the will, by the higher reason 
alone, is a neiessiiry one. Our greatest regret is that our space would not permit 
publication of all the excerpts from the "Meditations," each a fragment of a profound 
truth concerning the good life, which Mr. Prince had iiK luded in his work. 

EDITORIAL MISCELLANEA 

Any discussion of courses purely practical cannot fail to take account of the work 
of Comnumweahh College in Arkansiis, which is dedicated to the teaching of lalwr 
leaders, and in which the students are taught all the details of carrying on successful 
strikes. The teachers in that institution are doing their work so well, that a group of 
the students is said to have taken control of the campus in a strike which sought 
student representation on the faculty Board of Control and won it. 



What is in a method? The NSFA has sent out the annual story of the student, 
this time at the University of Alabama, who flunked a course entitled "How to 
Study," and passed all his other subjects with an average of "B." 



M. 



S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"Lei Dave do it" 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 
Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



ALUMNI RECOMMEND NEW 

DORMIIORIES BE BUILT 

(Continued from P»tt 1) 

each floor there is a single toilet, tub, one 
room on e.ich floor beiiig devoted to these 
facilities. 

First flcHjr: Four 4-year students and 
one 2-\ear student are roomers. The 
family on this floor consists of father, 
mother, and five small children; Total 
IKjpulation of floor 12. 

Second llcHjr: Six 4-year students. The 
family on this floor consist of father, 
mother, and small baby: Total-- 9. 

Third floor: Five 4-year students. The 
family on this floor consists of man and 
wife only. Total — 7. 

The total |)0|)ulation of tenement is 28. 

ComjHtition betweee' students for suit- 
able rooms is further sharjwned by the 
limited nuinlM-r of rooms near the campus. 
A table of distances of rooming accom- 
modations reveals that 57* of 4-year I tangil)le personal proiK-rty tax provided 
studems live over one half mile from the *5-4 cents, receipts from municipal public 
campus; ry% live over one mile; 2% over s<rvice emerprises 7.1 cents, miscellane- 
one and one-half miles; and H over two|ous municipal receipts 7.4 cents, income 
miles. Si.xty-one percent of the Stock- I tax 5.8 cents, motor vehicle excise tax 
bridge students live over cjne-half mile 



MOST OF TAX DOLLAR 

IS FOR LOCAL NEEDS 
(Continued from Page 1) 

tat ion service (1.2 cents, public service 
enterprises 4.5 cents, care of mental 
diseases '.i.'A cents, general government 
'.i.l cents, courts 1.7 cents, correction 
work L4 cents, interest and debt pay- 
ments 16.1 cents, and miscellaneous 5.2 
cents. This miscellaneous includes such 
items as metroixjiitan district coniniissicm, 
department of conservaticm. department 
of corporations and taxes, legislative de- 
partment, military department, etc. for 
state government. The count\ buildings, 
salaries of county officers and clerical 
helpers were also included in this item. 

Mr. Rozman also investigated where 
the Massachusetts revenue dollar comes 
from. In 19;} 1 real estate provided 5().8 
cents out of every dollar of revenue, 



from campus; 19J over one mile; and 
21 over one and one-half miles. 

A resume of the housing accommoda- 
tions for 4-year students follows: 





Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Dormitories 


113 


120 


2:i:} 


Other college bldgs. 


19 




19 


Commuters 


Ki 


42 


105 


Fraternities 


181 




181 


Private houses 


228 


65 


29.-} 


Totals 


604 


227 


8.31 



2 cents, motor vehicle fees, fines, etc. 
1.9 cents, gasoline tax .'}.5 cents, business 
corjxjration excise .3 cents, miscellaneous 
tax receipts .3.7 cents, inheritance excise 
2.8 cents, public service cor|X)rations 
excise 1.4 cents, insurance excise 1 cent, 
and all others .3.2 cents. 



Interfraternily Results 

For The Past Week 



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Dusting Powder 
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Complexion Cream 
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In interfraternity spo ts last week, 
Lanilnla Chi Al|)h.i, IMii Sijjma Kapi)a, 
Signiii Phi Epsilon, Q.T.V., and Alpha 
Si^ma Phi were winners in Inith volley- 
ball and basketball; while Kap|>a Sigma 
won its basketball game with Non- 
Fraternity. Phi Si^nia Kapi-a and I>lta 
Phi Alpha are the leaders of the two 
leagues in volleyball; and Lamtxia Chi 
Alpha and Sigma Phi Epsilon top the 
lists in basketball. 

The volleyball results for the last week 
were : 
Alpha Sigma Phi lost to Lambda Chi 

Alpha: 14-lC,, 15-;i, 10-1."). 
Phi Sigma Kappa defeate<l Kappa Epsi- 
lon: l.'>-4, 1. ")-(>. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon won from Theta Chi: 

15-9,0-15, 15-5. 
.Mj)ha Sigma Phi downed Alpha Gamma 

Kho: 15-t>. 15-7. 
Q.T.V. flefeated Non-Fraternity: 15-10, 

15- 12. 

The league stamlings in volleyball are: 



'19 John Vickers is chemist for the 
Carnation Company at Ferndale, Wash. 
He writes, "My wife and I Ixjth like this 
Puget Sound country. The salmon fish- 
ing and the hunting are the Ix-st in the 
country. If you ever get one of our 30-40 
|)ound spring salmon on the end of a 
light line, you will think so too." 



PROF. SPEIGHT SPEAKS 

ON INDIVIDUAL PLANNlM; 
(Continued front Pag* 1) 

agement is equally im|M)rtant within tli^ 
more private sphere of our indiv lin,,] 
lives. He |)ointed out the fact thai ihtre 
are ex|)erts ready with advice assuriiii; 
us that we can, if we will, adiievt 
efficiency in managing our inner resounis. 

Dr. S|H'ight said, (levelo])ing strciij^ih 
of will and breadth of syn>path\, ami 
intelligently hamlling life's problem- di. 
jKuds not on mechanisms, not e\i i\ (,n 
knowing ourselves but on qualities of the 
mind and heart. The secret of a wtl|. 
ordered life dejK'ntls fundamentally i,n 
that complex of habits, hopes and <l(-irts 
which we call a man's character, aii<l ii i, 
with this that religion is concerned. 

"There are three facts that ari ini- 
|X)rtant to face in all their imi)li( ,i!iiin«. 
First, we must not achieve orderliin ~s hy 
avoiding decisions. Here we may n im m- 
ber that 'God helps those who help 
themselves.' From order, jiower (oiiks 
to those who discover and recogni/.i \]w 
natural rhylhmsof life and who value the 
alternation of work and |)lay, com|Hiitiim 
and co-ojK'ration, jx-rsonal gain and pur- 
suit of unmercenary values like art and 
friendship. Third, we nmst keep in 
mind that nothing brings order into our 
lives so readily as a vision of the iMrdn. 
Men cannot live well who live in in- 
difference to the great ideals emlxMlicd 
in the example and teaching of the 
spiritually great. 



Phi Sig and Delta Phi are leading thiir 
respective volleyball leagues while 
Lambda Chi and Kappa Ep top the 
basketballers. 



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In basketball the results for la-.t week 



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in "CVNARA" 



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Kretlric Mari ii 

Claudette Colbrrt in 

TON'IGHT IS (JIRS 



THURS.. FEB. 2 

JOAN 
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FRI., FEB. i 

WALLACE 

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in 

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with Ricardo Cortez 
Karem Morley 
Jean Her.sholt 



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Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. 
Bete Davis — in 
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in "AFRAID to TALK" 



MON.. TUES.. FEB. <i-7 

Clark ( .able in NO MAN OF HER OWN 

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Spencer Tracy — ^Joan Bennett — in 
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RErAlRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE PRICES 

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Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and for Rent 

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College Drug Store 

W. IL McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



Typing 
First Class Work Low Rates 

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Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



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A CURRENT EVENT IN 
THE COLLEGIAN 



t 



Read the pertinent "The 
DepreMlon and the Stu- 
dent" by Xenoa tn today's 
Aftora column. 



4-5^'j^'4»**'^*'^4*''M'**$*^ 



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If. A. C. Library. 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
or THK WEEK 



ollegian 



The outstanding event of 
the week la the MardI Ciras 
which haa iMcoma once 
again a ciMtume affair. 



Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1933 



Number 15 



Prof. Patterson Talks 

On B yron's Travels 



Describes His Journey 

Over Byron's Route 

nescTibing the travels of Lord B>ron 
through Spain, Italy, Greece, and other 
European countries, Professor Charles 
Patterson of the English department 
s[)oke on his journey to Europe at the 
[.manage and Literature discussion last 
evening. Professor Patterson showed 
slides made from snapshots which were 
taken by Arthur Brown "6'.i who accoin- 
paiiied Professor Patterson. 

"Byron, as you know," Professor 
Patterson said, "had longed for many 
years to visit Greece, and after his attack 
on the critics and conventions of his day, 
he sailed for Spain. He went to Greece 
in a leisurely manner, visiting many 
countries en route." 

Professor Patterson commented U|X)n 
and showed scenes in Libson where Byron 
first landed. For several hundred miles 
through picturesque Spain, Byron travel- 
led to Cadiz. Then he visited Seville, 
Malta, and Preisia in Albania. Professor 
Patterson descril>ed Byron's shipwreck, 
his visit to the rel)el Mohamet-Ali, his 
ride through the wild tril)es of Greece 
under the Mohamet's passport, and finally 
his arrival in Messoloughi where a monu- 
ment was raised to him. 

"Byron was captivated by the struggle 
of the Greeks," Professor Patterson e.\- 
plained, "by their bravery am! i^rsist- 
ance in the battles with the Turks. Al- 
thou;;h the French counsel at Athens told 
hiiu the Greeks should not l»e given 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 




PROF. CHARLES Ii. PATTERSON 
. . . B>Ton's Travels 



COLLEGE COSTS 
BELOW AVERAGE 



Tuition in M.S.C. Iliither Than in 
Other Latid Grant Colleges 



Comparison of the cost of an v.'<lu(ation 
at Massachusetts .State and other land- 
grant colleges shows that NLissachiisetts 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 






k 



sc 



College 
Spectator 



dc 



5;* 






MUSSOLINI ON SPORTS 

Through the official publications of the 
Fasristi youth organizations, Mussolini 
has advised Fascist youth to read the 
sp<jrt pages of the newspajjers. He fur- 
ther advised them to read books about 
aviators, sf)ldiers, sailors, and explorers, 
and to est:hew all stories of Hollywood 
divorce, Paris night life, and Chicago 
gangsters. "Fascist Italy," he said, 
"niust renounce absolutely all frivolous 
thiu^;^." 



THREE MEN 

Three men, all outstanding in English 
literature, have within the past month 
joined the other masters in the English 
tradition, (ieorge Moore, famous for his 
Esther Waters," "A Story Teller's 
Holiday," etc., was the first of the 
trio to die. George Saintsbury, an 
English critic for many years, died only 
^ few days after Moore. John Gals- 
worthy, Nobel prize winner and creator 
of the Forsythe Saga, was the last to die. 



ROO.SEVELT 

franklin Roosevelt's plan for the es- 
'al)lishriient of prosperity on the basis of 
*"* new deal is, to say the least, very 
■imhitious. He intends to correlate water 
l^'*er, flood control, reforestation, agri- 
culture, and industry into one great 
Pfojert to l)e tried in Tennessee. In de- 
velopment, this vast project will elimin- 
•''e unemployment, exorbitant electric 
per rates, and bad agricidtural lands. 

on pajK-r the project appears slightly 
**'aiistir, in accomplishment it will lie 
^""■capitalistic. 



81^^ V .\MERICAN 

and "^ ' '*">■ British," "Buy American," 

" Buy French" mottoes, international 

h'^lf '^f,''"'"^"' 'l"""ied. However, in our 

ti'f ,' '"'^■'^-''ejiendent worid, such na- 

'^•nalistir cries, while sounding patriotic 

"^■^^ 'T from l,eing so. They will bring 

foil" '" ■* "'""try that Ijelieves in and 

' ''** •*iHh mottoes. Someone has sug- 

(Conunuad on P^* 4, Goiiuna l> 



SON OF DR. GOESSMANN 
DIES IN NEW JERSEY 

Noted Inventor and Chemist 
Graduate of M.S. (]. 

Charles Ignatious C>oessmann, chemist 
and inventor, died in his 5«»th year, of 
pneumonia, at All Soul's Hospital, .Mor- 
ristown, N. J., Decemlx;r .'iOth. He was 
the son of Charles Anthony (kjessmann, 
to whom the Goessmann Lalwratory is 
dedicated. 

Mr. Goessmann was born at Amherst, 
Mass. where his father, Charles Anthony 
(ioessmann, Ph.D. (ioettingen, LL.U. 
Amherst, the first presirlenf of the 
American Chemical S<Hiety (\HHi\), was 
for years professor of chemistry at 
Massachusetts State College and director 
of the State Exfieriment Station. Charles 
Gtxissmann whose mother, l)efore her 
marriage, was Miss Kinney of Syracuse, 
N. Y., was graduated from Mass. State 
College with a l»achelor of science degree. 
During his period of study here, his 
interests on campus were many. He was 
a lover of books and 8tu<ly, an<I his 
generous heart and cheery way won ff)r 
him many friends. Men of real distinction 
in the uses of ap|)lied chemistry con- 
sidered Mr. (ioessmann's one of the l)est 
minds in the profession. 



Mardi Gras Held in 

Full Costume This Year 

Benton P. Cummings ".VA was awarded 
first prize for the l)est man's costume and 
Helen Reardon '.36 first prize for the U-st 
woman's costume at the Mardi (»ras, 
annual dance of the Marwii Key, which 
was held Fr!da>, February :}rd in the 
Drill Hall from 8 until 12. This year, for 
the first time in several years, the .VlarfKjn 
Key, headerl by Francis Burke, dance 
chairman, ruled that no one could !« 
admitted unless he were in costume. 

With wall decorations of mar(x>n and 
yellow and giant clusters of colored 
balloons overhead, the Drill Hall was the 
center of activities of clowns, fwlicemen, 
Indians, Spaniards, devils, anrl [jeople in 
nearly every conceivable kind of cjstume. 
Lew Carey's Hotel Nonotuck orchestra 
played for dancing from 8 until 12. 

Captain and Mrs. Dwight Hughe> and 
Captain and Mrs. HeriK.-rt Watkins. 
(CMtlnuad on Paga 4, Column 4) 



EUROPEAN COLLEGES 
RAISE REQUIREMENTS 

Restrictions Made Against Foreign 
.Medical Students 

.\merican and other foreign students, 
especially of the medical faculty, will 
henceforth be more carefully examined as 
to their prep.iratory qualifications before 
they are admitted to the University of 
Cologne, in order not to take limited 
accomiiuxlalions in lalioratories away 
from German students, it was learned 
recently. The Prussian .Ministry of Edu- 
cation in particular, has ordered that all 
a|)plications of foreign medical students 
be sulimittcd to it In-forc they .ire ad- 
mitted. 

As a result of this stricter control only 
fifteen out of sixty American students 
who applied recently for admittance 
actually arrive<l here. Meanwhile, word 
has Inrn receive<I from Professor Pick, 
Dean of the medical facultv of the Uni- 
versity of Vienna, that in future cre«len- 
tials of all American stu<lents who wish 
to stiidv at the V'ienn.i Medic.il F.iciill\ 
must l)c p.issed u|Min b>' the .Xssfxi.ition 
ol American Medical Colleges. 

F(»ll«>wing are extracts from a letter 
from Dr. II. S. Krans, the director of the 
American University Union in Paris, to 
the editor of L'lnformation Universitaire 
and ]>ulilished in that p.i|K-r on Decemlier 
3rd, regar<liiig the admission of .American 
students to French facidties of medicine: 

"In mid-NovemlKT, I'.t.J'J, the C(jnsul- 
tative Committee for Me<licine of the 
Ministry of National Kdutation con- 
sidered f,iv<>r.il)ly .1 new pnxediire which 
will {leniiit it to inform its«df, miire fully 
than it has been able to do in the |>ast, 
regarding the degrees and (pialifications 
of stu<Ients of the I nite<l States who seek 
admission to French faculties of medicine. 
This new pr<xedure will provide that 
henceforth the credentials of all Aiiwri- 
cans <le.siring to enter French medical 
faculties shall lie submitted for prelim- 
(Contlnued on Page 4, Column 4) 



Students Hear President 

Baker For First Time 



DEBATERS MEET 
SPTLD AND A.LC. 



Interfraternity Sing 

to be Held Saturday 

Harmony, tone tpiality, enunciation, 
and interpretation will Ite among the 
most important factors to be judged in 
the annual interfraternity singing contest 
to be held in Bowker Auditorium, Satur- 
day aftern(x>n at L.'IO o'clcxk. Each 
fraternity will sing two songs which may 
Ik! made up of either <:ollege or fraternity 
s<jngs, anfl must In- represented by not 
less than twelve men. -v 

Dr. Miles II. CublKin, Prof. Clark 
Thayer, and Mrs. Arthur L. Beaumont 
will be the judges. This contest will 
count as one «|uarter tjf the academic 
credits which are awarded towani the 
interfraternity cup. All the fraternities 
on campus have signifie<l their intention, 
of entering a group into the contest. J^ 

The program for the contest has Ijeen 
arrangetl so that it will conclu<le in 
sufficient time for the participants to 
attend the basketball game between 
Vermont and Mass. State which is 
being played in the afternfx<n l>ecause of 
the many fraternity banquets Ijeing held 
in the evening. 



Recognition of Soviet Russia Subject 
of DiscuMion 

That the L'nited States should recog- 
nize the governnii nt of the l'ni<in of 
StM'i.ilistic Soviet Republics is the (piestion 
the debating team will discuss with 
Springfield and .American Inleriiatioiial 
College ill Springfi.-ld on IVbru.iry 10. 
The c«)llege team will uphold the negative 
side of the cpiestion with J. Malcolm 
Fowler ';{;{ and Ashle> (iurney '.{.'{ com- 
posing the team which will debate 
Springtiehl College, and Nathaniel Hill 
'.'i4 an<l Donald Donnelly '3t> the team 
which will meet .American International 
C(»llege. 

Gn February 14, the debating team will 
discuss the question of cancell.ition of 
inter-governmental war debts with the 
Bowdoin College team in Memorial Hall. 
The iiu'iuIhts of the team for this debate 
have not lieen chosen as yet. 

The debate with .Springfield College 
will be held at 2 p.m. and with the 
American International College at S p.m. 
The debate with Springfield College last 
year ended in no decision and the State 
College team was awarded a 2-1 decision 
over the Amerii an International Ct>llege 
last February. 



AMHERST INSTRUCTOR 
SPEAKS AT CHAPEL 

James Cleland Deplores Mechaniza- 
tion uf Life 



CAMPU.S CALENDAR 



Tit belter to be lowly born 
And range wilh humble livers in content 
Than to be perk'd up in a ulislerint grief 
A nd wear a golden sitrrrne. 

— .Shakespeare — Henry V'lll 



Wednesday, Fet»ruiiry 8 ...„„. 

;i.2f) p.m. Ais<>mt)ly I'tcs. HurH P. Baker 
7.00 p.m. Animal Husbandry Club meeting 

Stockt)ridKe Hall 
S.fX) p.m. Varsity Basketball Providence 

tiere 

Thursday, February » ..,.,. 

7.:jO p.m. Band Kfhearsal Memonal Hall 

Friday, February 10 

.■{.00 p.m. Varsity Hockey Colgate here 

Saturday, February II 

l..'JOp.m. Chesw and Checker Club 

Memorial Hall 
3,(X) p.m. N'ar-ity Hockey Middlebury here 
S.rWJ p.m. Varsity Basketball Vermont here 

Sunday. February II 

<*(KJam. Sunday Chapel Rabbi Harry 

Kaplan 
3..'i<J p.m. Radio Concert Memorial Hall 

Monday. February 13 

8 00 p m. Newman Club Parish Hall 
s:jO p.m. Glee Club .Memorial Hall 

Tuesday, February 14 , , , _ „ 

4.'. p.m. I^nguaKc and Literature Talk 
H<W p.m. Campus Chorus Memorial Hall 



That those things which m.ike for a 
really abundant life should be pnxliKed 
by man -the real craftsman rather than 
by machinery, was the thesis of the 
-Sunflay morning chapel ad<lress (jf Mr. 
James T. Cleland of Amherst College 
on F"ebruary 5th. To«Jay those very 
things are l>eing created by machinery, 
he said, and our s]>iritual level is l>eing 
lowered to the mechanical. 

While Moses kept his (leople in the 
wihierness for 4() years, he was "whipping 
them into a nation." lie was building 
them u|) so they might gain f»K>thold in 
Palestine, he was cre.iting an early 
machine age of civiliziition. The jKHjple 
learne«l to carry giKwIs in wagims rather 
than on their heads anrl backs. Only one 
thing-- the Ark of (iod must still Ik* 
Ijorne on the shoulders of men. This Ark, 
which was essentially a Im>x containing 
two stones from Mt. Sinai, represented 
the seal and symljol of (i<Krs presence 
within the cam|), anrl was carried and 
guarded by picked men. 

Parallel to this situation is our own 
ma<:hine age with its factories, slums and 
overcrowded crities. Our factories have 
made fK>ssible the [ircxliiction of !KM) 
million shoes in one year, whereas onlf 
.'WK) million can \n: used in the same time. 
They have brought unemployment in 
stearl of leisure, and want insteacl 
(Condnuad on Pafa 4, Colana 5) 



of 



Philharmonic Orchestra 
in All-Wagner Program 

In commemoration of the fiftieth .inni- 
versary of the death r)f Richard W.igner. 
the Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra 
will \>c heard in an all Wagner program 
next Sunday over the radio in Memorial 
Hall at .3 o'clock. Bruno Walter will 
conduct the orchestni and Friedrii h 
Schorr, baritone, will l>e soloist, and the 
program will consist of the Andante frf>m 
Symphony in C; "Faust" overture; the 
Bacchanale fiom "Tannhaus*;r"; Wotan's 
Farewell, from "Die Walkure"; Prelude 
and Love-Death from "Tristan unrl 
Isolde"; Prelude to "Parsifal," and Hans 
.Sach's monhjgue from "Die Meister- 
singer." 



Dr. Baker Asks for 

Student Cooperation 

Declaring that the college will l)e living 
up to its obligations and op|M>rt unities 
only as far as it assists the state with 
effective le.idership in solving economic 
problems, President Hugh Baker pre- 
sented his first message to the students 
and f.iculty at .issiMnbly this afternoon 
in Bowker Auditorium. Dr. Baker also 
siiid that ;i college should point the way, 
stimulate Ihouglil, and develop enthusi- 
asm and initiative, but it cannot educate 
students. 

"The College, as a slate sup|M)rte(i 
institution," President Baker stated, "is 
vitally concerned with the lan<l problems 
of thest.ite with all that that me.ins tcMlay 
in the way of scnial and ec (iiiomic changes 
and arljiistments. We have l)efore us in 
the state the solution of problems (tf con- 
serving and incre.isiiig all of our natural 
resources in such a way as to make them 
contribute most to the satisfactory living 
of our people." 

Dr. Baker ailded that as men and 
women working together in the «levelop- 
iiient of a greater college it is exceeilingly 
important that students develop the 
ability to think through to nn honest 
decision as to what are the essentials an<I 
what are the incidentals of life. Con- 
ditions tiiday are bringing us to a greater 
appreciation of the essential neces.sily of 
just pi. till hard work, not only in getting 
ready for life, but in making life woith 
while to the state and nation. 

"The College," .s.iid President Maker 
(Continued on Pate 4. Columa 9) 

MILITARY INSTRUCTOR 
ENLISTS FOR 9TH TIME 

Sgt. Warren Completes Twenty-fifth 
Year in Army 

Technical Sergeant James A. Warren, 
instructor in military science and tactics 
at Mass.u husetls State College, re- 
enlisted last week at the Springfield 
recruiting station for the ninth time. 
Sergeant Warren has served 2.'i years in 
the army and has In-en attached to the 
K.O.T.C. unit at this <-ollege for twelve 
years. 

He first enli.sted in the rexnhir army 
July .'{(>, 1!M)1, and was pl.i<e<l on active 
duty as i>rivate and <orp*>ral in Cuba and 
the Philippine Islanrls. Returning to the 
United States, .Sgt. Warren was trans- 
ferred to the Mexican Border, but wwn 
returned tf) the Phili()pin<'s as a s«'rgeant. 
On August 24, l!tl7, he was apixiinted 
tenifKirary second lieutenant. .Soon after 
he was promoted to c.iptain of cavalry 
and statione<i at the officers training camp 
at Fort Logan and later Camp Pike. He 
was transferred to the field artilh-ry with 
the rank of fielil major in th.it same year. 
S'ige.int Warren was in active service 
overs«'as and hehl the r.tnks of Battalion 
and Regimental Conimari<ler of the 7Kth 
Division in field artillery, commanding 
[)rovisional gii.irfl battalion and assistant 
jK)st (-f)mrTiand.inf in Antwerp, Belgium. 
(Condoued on Page 4, Columa i) 



Cotton Prints Shown 

in Newest Exhibition 

Cotton prints representing some of the 
l)est work in that pha.se of mrxlern 
American industrial art make up the 
February art exhibition now on the walls 
of .Memorial Hall. These 25 framed 
samples supplied by the Cotton Textile 
Institute ar*- circulate*! as a traveling 
exhibition by the National Alliance of 
Art and Industry. 

I'rints by twelve manufacturers are in- 
cluded in the exhibit showing a wide 
variety of designs, color, and texture. 
Students of design will find interest in 
the use of design in the various types of 
prints which appear in the exhibition. 



THE MASSACHUSLTTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 8. 1933 



\ 







/BbaesacbugellF Collegian 



Official newspajjer of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Th u rsday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



Raymond Royal '34 
euobnb (".ukalkiiic '33 
Manatii*t Bdilors 



JOSBI'H FOLIIELLA 

Lditor-in-Ckit/ 



Alfrida L. Okdway "33 
AttociaU Editor 



News Department 
Raymond Royal "34, hditor 
Alfrbda L. Ordway '33 
Ruth D. Campbbll '34 
Harribttb M. Jackson '34 
Maby L. Allbn '35 
David L. Arbnbbrg '36 
Elizahbth K. Harbwcton '35 
EoirB M. Parsons "36 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 
Editorial 

JOSlilH PoLITBLLA 

Athletlca 

Thegdokb M. Lbaby 'Sa Edttur 
Silas Littlb, Jr. '38 
Glbnn F. Shaw '35 



Edward J. Talbot '34 
AdtvHunt Manat*T 

Fbank Batbtonb '34 

John Wood '35 



Faatura 

Stanley F. Sbpbrski '34 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ASHLBY B. Gurnby '33 

Butiiuss Uanagtr 



Ezcbanftea 
Altbboa L. Obdwat '33, Editor 



srkTE 



Have you ever noticed the facial con- 
tortions that accompany the simple act 
of brushing the teeth?— a«d noihing can 
be done ahuut it. 




This week's prize is unanimously given 
to the freshman who carried a box of 
chocolate bars along with him on his 
fraternity hike and then tried to sell them 
to the other menilwrs of the excursion. 



THE DEPRESSION AND THE 
STUDEN r 



BuslnMB AaalatanU 



W. Lawrknck ScHBNcr '84 
CircMlalion Manager 

Nblson Stbvkns '35 

Gborgb Pbasb '35 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 

as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



"Did you go to the dance last night?" 

"Veah." 

"How did you like it?" 

"Swell!" 

"How was the orchestra?" 

"Smooth." 

"How was your partner?" 

"Snujoth." 

"Are you a college student?" 

"Yeah!" 



Ent'er^l a. ..econd-claM matter, at^ the Amjje^t^ Post Office. _Acce^ Co, mai.te. at .^lal raU 



or ^Llrprrv.?^rrTn"s^?.^n iy03"'\ror(^^t^^^^ Au.u.t aO. 191^ 



ss 

For the benefit of the interested co-eds, 
the name of every unmarried instructor 
at the University of Minnesota is indi- 
cated in the catalogue by an asterik. Of 
course at a small college, such as ours, 
this precaution is unnecessary. 



-ss — 



IRENDS IN EDUCATION 

One wonders, oftentimes, whether the persistent agitation on the part of far- 
sight e.l men will ever change the aimlessness of modern methods of education. 
Every once in a while though a faint but encouraging breeze, seems to sweep across 
the field of educational theory. We consider the two articles which follow encouraging 
points of view in interpreting the advance of new ideas in education. 
Individualism Seen as New Teaching Aim 
The growing trend toward individualism in education and the improvement in 
schm.l and college relations to bring about this end were noted in discussions by 
prominent educators recently at a joint conference on college admissions and guid- 
ance problems which have been emphasized largely through changes in social con- 
ditions. , 
The conference was held under the auspices of the committees on personnel 
metlKKls and on college testing of the American Council on Education, the comnus- 
sion on the rel.ition of school and college of the Progressive Education Association 
and the Educational Reconls Bureau, in conjunction with the bureau's second 
general meeting of institutional members. 

"The present discontent and agitation for refoims in education are due to a 
fundamental error in the assumption that the e.lucational system should l.e wholly 
or principallv conservative." s;iid Dr. John 13. Johnston, dean of the University of 
Minnesota, in discussing the guidance function in the secondary scho<5ls and colleges. 
"Wliai the elders of greatest wis<lom know to be necessary for the safety and welfare 
of society includes the intnjduction at frequent intervals of changes in institutions 
to adapt them to new conditicms." 

Dr. Johnston held that the fundamental philosophy of higher ediiciition was the 
full .levelopment of the native qualities of the individual so that he may "be ready 
to render such service as he can for the a.laptalion of social institutions m resix>nse 
to changes ai)pearing in the environment and in man himself." 

To forward social evolution, he continued, the pupil should have contacts with 
human and social elements in his environment, while the school should not be en- 
veloped in "an exclusive atmosphere of lesson-learning which might hide valuable 
qualities in the individual." The elementary schools, he thought, should be "a con- 
tinuous experience in living instead of a succession of pericxls of memorizing de- 
scriptions of facts and prwesses and of passing tests." 

"Knowle<lge. like stock values, may be acquired and lost," Dr. Johnston de- 
clared "It is time for us to recognize that the acepiisition of knowledge is only a 
p^rt of, or a means to, larger gwuls, namely, individual power of performance, 
human s.uisfaction and social welfare." 

•The need of comparative ret:ords of students and classes, not only within the 
college, but also with other institutions, ap,)ears to be dcride<lly pressing," Dr. 
Frank I . McVev, president of the University of Kentucky, observed. "Searching 
examinaticm of courses of stiuiv, consideration of interests and guidance of students 
in finding their interests must lie initiated. Students cannot be dumped into a hopper 

as thev are now. 

"The progress made here and there in the secondary field and in the college level 
encourages one to believe that we are on the way to individualism of education through 
the process of finding out what the individual is and what he needs." 
Princeton Broadens Requirements for Admission 

Princeton University's new plan of admission, approved by the Board of Trustees 
at its winter meeting is designed "to meet the advances made in secondary education 
in the last decade," a detailed explanation of it declares. 

The new plan which "involves a fundamental change in the relation of school to 
colleg2 " has three major features: Opiiortunity for advanced college work is given 
to the exceptional applicant; greater flexibility is permitted in the course of study- 
pursued bv the applicant in his preparation for Princeton; and recognition is accorded 
courses which arc the equivalent of, but do not specifically meet. College Entrance 
Examination Board requirements. .... 

"The new scheme," the announcement states, "abolishes the concept of admission 
as a goal or end in itself. The conception of admission to college as a general ad- 
missions ticket p^iid for in units is disavowed. The new method is not designed as 
relate.1 solely to admission, but will enable Princeton to continue the individual s 
own e<lucational program as it has already been partially developed in the school 
The admissions problem has l*en looked at anew as a transfer from one educational 

institution to another. . r> •» d ■ . • 

"The advantages of the new plan should be obvious." says the Daily Pnncetoman 
in an editorial. "It enables the schools to extend then range of studies, particularly 
in 'the field of the social sciences and the fine arts. Too often there is a tendency to 
regard secondary school training as a separate part of education, without properly 
relating it to college. By permitting an extension in the range of schot>l studies, the 
new plan should encourage the development of more maturely-mmded students,- 
students with a wider background for their college work. In the third place, the 
development of honors programs in the schools should be stimulated. Of even 
Kre Iter value should be the direct effect upon the man admitted to Princeton. The 
ch ing<-s instituted view the problem of entrance as 'a transfer from one educational 
institution to another.' There is a direct appeal to the interests of the incoming 
student and a ( ..ntinuity of interest is established, based on the educational value 
of those interests and not on the conformity to College Board rules. Finally an 
attempt is made to grant to the exceptional student the opportunity to progress in 
accordance with his abilities."— NSFA 



Much credit is clue to the Maroon Key 
for its Mardi Gras. . . It took some 
courage to make it a compulsory costume 
dance. . . And it was gratifying to see so 
many co-operate. . . Even to the adagio 
dances {x;rformed by the Lambda Chi 
"angels.". . . Some Phi Sigs could or 
would not get partners so they kid- 
napped some of their own bros. and 
dolled 'em up as ladies. . . They got away 
with it too. . . Little (?) Lord Fauntleroy 
seemed out of place among all the tramps, 
devils, clowns and pirates. . . What long 
legs you have Fauntie! . . . The orchestra 
furnished plenty of swell music and kept 
things piping. . . Although the memliers 
of the orchestra were in costume the 
chaperones clung to the rainments of 
civilization. . . (Juite an i<lea that swap- 
ping balloons for tlances. . . You can 
never get something for nothing. . . Think 
of the p<K»r fellow who had to bring his 
girl home that night and got back himself 
at eight the next morning. . . He slept 
all day and then had to meander around 
the backwoods all that night. . . Even 
Clark (iable wore a Scout suit at a 
costume dance. 



-ss- 



Negative— "Co-eds are nothing but 
noisy, fastidious, ill-temiK>rcd parrots 
who later develop into parasites," de- 
clared the upholders of the negative side 
of the question, "Resolved, that co-edu- 
cation should Income a part of the 
system at Boston College." This state- 
ment was greeted by cheers and hearty 
approval by the audience which consisted 
of B.C. students. Continuing "Educa- 
tion would lie torn from het lofty fiedestal 
and the guileful female would lie put 
there in her stead to the great detriment 
of all concerned." 

Affirmative— "No longer will they (B.C. 
men) run away from the painted face and 
the appalling line of chatter that these 
students have. Rather it will develop in 
them (the men) a courage to meet the 
shafts of sarcasm that a co-etl can deal 
out with a Homeric type of courage in 
keeping with the Boston College tradi- 
tions," asserted a mcmlier of that losing 
affirmative. 



The Existinit Situation 

In the field of education, something of 
value may yet be found in the devastating 
effect of the depression. Even here in the 
academic life, where the waves of that 
depression beat less violently than in the 
cities, the force of the turmoil is felt. 
There is deprivation of many gocxl things, 
and of some that are almost necessities of 
life, and there is much worry about 
ability to remain in college at all. If 
there is any bright side to all this anxiety 
and strain, surely it is worthy of con- 
sideration. 

Modern Education 
Education used to be defined as 
"Doing what you didn't want to do, in 
a way you didn't like, at a time when 
you'd rather lie doing something else." 
Now, with the spirit of unrest and revolt 
from all authority which is rampant, the 
opposite idaa seems to prevail, from the 
so-called "progressive" schof)ls for pre- 
kindergarten children to complete elec- 
tive systems, and "honors" courses for 
exceptional students, which free these 
selected men and women for awhile from 
any requirement to attend classes or 
lectures. Such "honors" courses are 
coming into existence on all si<les, in 
neighbor colleges and universities, and, 
undoubtedly, with the conditions and 
restrictions governing them, are an ex- 
cellent innovation if they are an inno- 
vation. 

At the two most famous .American 
institutions of higher learning the same 
underlying impulse appears in the tutori- 
al system which has lieen recent K estab- 
lished. By this system, certain meml)ers 
of the faculty, selected for their under- 
standing of human nature, and their 
sympathy with undergraduates, are as- 
signed to small groups of students. With 
these few men they try to liecome thor- 
oughly acquainted, so as to learn their 
real desires and nee<ls, and their real 
intellectual interests. In one case, for 
instance, a student was found who was 
majoring in literature, an<l who was 
lM)red t(» death. When asked what course 
he had actually enjoye<l most, he replied 
that he liked l)est the course in the 
anatomy of the cat. When asked further 
why he specialized in literature when he 
didn't like it, he said that his family felt 
that it was more elegant, and regarded 
cat-carving as messy and nasty. After 
further conferences his courage rose, he 
transferred to courses in biology . and has 
Ijecome an enthusiastic zoologist. .An- 
other student, probably a "poor little 
rich boy," had no real interest in any- 
thing but horses; stimulated to intellec- 
tual courage and honesty, he produced, 
Ijefore he graduated, a notable thesis on 
the inlluence of horse-drawn traffic on 
the life of England in the 17th century. 
The Student's Thinking 
The great charge that is being made 
against American colleges today is that 



students are stifled and smothered with 
information, and are given no aid in 
learning to think. For years before they 
come to college, most of thein have U-en 
told that they must not try to think (or 
themselves; and if, in a moment of high 
school graduation glory, they try to 
burst their mental baby clothes on enter- 
ing college, ridicule from fellow students 
and many teachers soon silences them. 
and they learn a complete aiinor oi 
woidy subterfuge, lal)elled philosojjhic 
susj>ension of judgment, relativity, npen- 
mindedness. toleration, or the scientific 
method, to list some of the moie popular 
and high-sounding camouflages foi in- 
tellectual parasitism. By all these names 
is covered the theory that the individual 
is not under obligation to think, because 
the world of learning is too vast for him 
to cover or understand. What could he 
a more terrible farce as the common out- 
come of a dozen years of intensive edu- 
cation? Yet no clear-sighted observer 
can deny that this result is seen on every 
side of us, and, if not the usual result, it 
is at least an unhappily frecjuent one 
with our present educational methods. 
The Value of a Misfortune 
What has all this to do with the famous 
economic depression? Is this all suggested 
as a homeopathic system of "like cures 
like," since in the business woild we have 
too many possessions, and in the aca- 
demic too much information? There is a 
close parallel, but the spot of cheer re- 
ferred to lies in the cases of the ultim.ite 
hardship resulting eveiy now and then 
to students, whereby they are force<l, 
tem|H>rarily at least, out of college alto- 
gether. This misfortune, which seems so 
dark to the individual involved, is not a 
misfortune at all, if rightly viewed. Few 
of us can go abroad for study, to enjoy 
the complete free<lom of elective courses 
in German universities, oi that nobler 
freedom of a world of free learning at 
Oxford or Cambridge, where for centuries 
the tutorial system, now coming among 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1933 



us, has given a breadth of culture ind a 
love for it. probably uncqiialleil in the 
learned worUl. But if a man is foneil to 
drop out of the com|ietition and drive of 
college life, this may be the finest thin; 
(Continued on Fafta i. Column 3) 



Stochbri^oe | 



-ss- 



.\ freshman smoker was held at the 
Kolony Klub Friday. February 3 with 
twenty-five in attendance. 

New ofiticers and memliers of the 
Stockbridge Student Council were form- 
ally installed at assembly on Thursday, 
February 2. This installation inaugurated 
a custom which will l)e followed at the 
ojiening of each school year. Officers 
elected aie: James W. Brandley S'.!.) n! 
Jamaica Plain, president; Bernard T. 
Hill S';« of Framingham. vice-prtsident; 
and Crt-orge T. Mueller S':W of Holyoke, 
secretary -treasurer. To fill the \.icancy 
caused by the resignation of .WUed B. 
Jaeger, former vice-president, of Newark, 
N. J., who has withdrawn from schm>l, 
Carl A. Frank S'3.i of Falmouth was 
elected as a representative of the senior 
class. 



Called upon by the professor to explain 
why he wrote his name Phtholognyrrh, 
yet pronounced it Turner, a student at 
Lowell Textile replied: "PHTH (as in 
phthisis)— T; OLO (as in colonel)— 
UR; GN (as in gnat)— N; YRRH (as 
myrrh)— ER." 

And this is what an education can do 
to some! 

ss 

A group of co-eds at Northwestern 
University have banded together and 
pledged themselves not to go out with 
any of the male students of the Univer- 
sity. .As a sign of their organization, these 
co-eds are wearing a yellow riblxin around 
their arms. In retaliation some of the 
male students have formed a similar 
fraternity called the Bachelor's Club with 
the ruling that no nieml)er will date a 
co-ed. Their ba<lge is a black arm band. 



ATTY. IIICKEY TO SPEAK TO 
NEWMAN CLUB 

Thomas R. Hickey will be the speaker 
at the Newman Club meeting which will 
lie held at the new Parish Hall, February 
VA, at 8 p.m. This is the first of the series 
of regular monthly meetings which will 
be conducted by the Newman Club of 
Massachusetts State College. 

Mr. Hickey. prominent lawyer of 
Northampton and a member of the 
Knights of Columbus, is well-known for 
his interest in organizjitions that are con- 
ducted by young people. William Bedord 
'.3.'}. Marguerite MacMahon "S^i, Nancy 
Russell '34, and Daniel Foley '35 are 
members of the committee which is in 
charge of the program. Refreshments 
will be served and everyone interested 
is invited to attend. 



Another Dean's Saturday! 



RABBI HARRY KAPLAN 

Rabbi Harry Kaplan, representative 
of the Union of American Hebrew Con- 
gregations in Jewish work on this campus, 
will speak at Sunday Chapel on Feb. 12. 
On next Monday, Rabbi Kaplan will 
give his annual lecture to students in the 
history of religions course. The speaker 
is a graduate of the University of Minne- 
sota, and has studied in New York insti- 
tutions. 



Athletic certificates were presented to 
all members of the crosscountry and 
football scjuads who won their letters and 
sweaters during the past season by 
Director R. H. Xerlieck at niornin? 
assemi)ly last Thurs<lay. J. Luis Zuretu 
of Lexington is captain-elect of the Hwt- 
ball team for next yeai . 

^^^^^^^^-^-^-^^ 

^ announcements ^ 

SIGMA XI CLUB 

Dr. Donald K. Tressler. chief chemist 
of the General Foods Corp., Gloucester. 
Mass., will speak on "Recent Investi- 
gations in Food Preservation" in M«'^'^ 
rial Hall, February 16, at 8 p.m. This^'» 
the first public lecture sponsored b) ' 
M.S.C. Sigma Xi Club, with the aid o 
the Graduate Club. Refreshments »i 
be served. 

DARTMOUTH GLEE CLlB ^ 

Together with the Dartmouth CoUj^ 
Instrumental Club and the Barba^^ 



lUtil 

)nc«rt 

Row'kff 
at the Social Union program m »" 

auditorium on Friday evenmg. r ^_^ 

The concert will be followed •'> ^ JJj 

which has been arranged by the I"" 

Committee. 



Coast dance orchestra, the Uartmo 
College Glee Club will present a cor' 



SPORTS 



Hockey Sextet Wins Two; 
B.U. Speedsters Down State 



PONY LINE, FEATURES 
SCORING ATTACK 



With Captain Hammond scoring the 
only goal, early in the first period, the 
Massachusetts State hockey team over- 
came a stubborn Mass;»chusetts Institute 
of Technology sextet, 1-0, on the College 
Pond yesterday. The win over Tech was 
the third straight xdctory for the Maroon 
and White skaters. 

The State team threatened the Tech 
goal continually but due to very poor ice 
conditions, could not get together to 
se'ore a goal. Hammond's goal was the 
result of a brisk scrimmage in front of 
the Tech cage, the Maroon and Wh'te 
t.iptaiii finally garnering the puck and 
sending it into the nets for the only score 
(,[ tlie game. 

Combining a fast attack with a staunch 
defense, the Massachusetts State sextet 
handed Hamilton College its first defeat 
of the season by a score of 3-2. at the 
Russell Sage hockey rink at Clinton last 
Saturday night. 

The lineup: 

Mass. State Hamilton 

McCiui'kian. s 



A. Brown. Id 
Blackburn, rd 
Cain, c 

W. Brown, Iw 
llaniinoiul. rw 



g. Scott 

M. Heyl 

rd, Edwards 

c, McKenzie 

Iw, Crumb 

rw. Crumb 



Mass. State spares — Snow. Henry, Corcoran. 
Haiiiiiton spares — Collina, Neff, Crane, Jones, 

foUey. 



By scoring his second goal early in the 
third (Xjriod, Sug Cain led his team- 
mates to a 3-2 win over the Middlebury 
Panthers last Tuesday on their own rink. 

Catching the Middlebury team off 
guanl in his end zone, Cain matle a solo 
dash down the ice and tifle<l the puck 
past the Panther goalie for the first 
score of the game. Both teams opened uj) 
with fast skating but the bare spots in 
the rink [irevented any passing attack 
to fuiKtion. By working a clever pass 
play in fiont of the State goal, Middle- 
Itury evened the score when Clarke, 
right wing, slipped the puck into the net. 

.\ lluke goal early in the second stanza 
put the Panther sextet into the lead. A 
long shut from mid-ice by Yeomans hit 



CRAWFORD'S RUNNING 
LEADS DERBYMEN 

M.iss^uhiisetts .State track team assisted 
the Boston Iniversiiy track team in 
opening its indoor season auspiciously 
last Saturday as the Maroon and White 
succumbed to the Terriers 4S-20 in a 
dual meet at the Livingston Street 
•Armory in Boston. Red Crawford '33 
was the individii.il star of the meet for 
State as he annexed first place in both the 
600 an<l 1000. 

Guenard '35 gave the State trackmen 
an early lead by placing first in the 50- 
yard dash. The lead was short lived as 
B.U. swept the hurdles due in part to 
the fact th.i. Phil Stephans tripped as lie 
was negotiating the last hurdle. Hill 
Gillette '.'Jo cop^x-d the mile an<l Bill 
Jordan '35 took third place in the s.ime 
event to put State back in the running. 
Gillette also placed second to Crawf<jrd 
in the KKK) to give State some more 
coveted iwints. Captain Pruyne made .i 
strong bid for the 31X) but could garner 
no better than a second place, as he 
slipix.'d while negotiating the last im- 
provised corner bank. 

B.U. captured the first two places in 
lx)th the shot put and the high jump to 
give them an insurmountable lead, al- 
though Rod Ciimmings '35 gained a third 
place in the shot and Capt. Pruyne a 
third in the high jum|) to keep B.U. from 
sweeping these events. The meet clcjsed 
with "Granny" Pruyne making a valiant 
but unsuccessful attempt to overtake 
Bloom of B.U. in the relay meet which 
went to B.U. by a scant few yards. 



a bare spot in front of the State goal and 
bounced past McGiickian, the .St.ite 
guardian. Bef<»re the end of this peii(Ml, 
Corcoran jilaced the \isiting team on an 
even basis when he dented the strings of 
the opjKjsing cage. 

With about eight minutes left to pl.iy 
in the final perifMl, Cain poke-checked the 
rubl»er from a Middlebury sk.iter, eluded 
the flefense and llip|Kd the fiuck i-iihl the 
Panther goalie. In the closing minutes 



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PROF. P.VrTERSON I ALKS 

ON BYRON S TR.WELS 
(Continued from I'uite |) 

freedom because of their indi\idual .iiul 
n.ition.d depravity, Byion woiked for 
their e.iu>e. He believed fieedtim would 
remedy any defects in the tireek charac- 
ter." 

In It.dy, Byron was iKcupied for a 
time with the intrigues and conspiracies 
of the Carlionari who sonjiht freedom 
from the .\ustri.ins. Ik> spent several 
ye.irs in X'enice. He six-nt some time at 
.111 .\rmeiiian monastery where he hel|H-d 
Father .\u her write an .Xrmenian dic- 
tionary which is published every year by 
a printing; press which Byron helpecl the 
monks to purchase. l'r()fe.->sor P.itteisoii 
showed scenes of in.iiiy |)l.ues where Lord 
Byron (tassed so many of his years. 



AGORA 

(Continued from Pu^e 2) 

that ever happened. Many a man who 
h.is had to <lrop out of collrm- for ,i st'.ir 
«)r two r.in testify th.it nolhiiii; th.it ever 
happened to him was so v.duable, or 
truly ediic.itixe. This d(H's not mean 
simply that he thus took the lieKiee of 
B.H.K. — bachelor of haul kncnks .d- 
thoii^h most of us need th.it de^jree more 
than any other. 

A p^'ri<Ml of enforced seclusion permits 
thinking, revaluation of the elements of 
one's life, ,ind a fresh siirve\ of the world. 
A in.m who takes this opportunity rightly 
w'll know l>etter what he wants and 
wishes from the worhl, and wh.it he i.in 
reasonably hope to ^ive it in return. 
Students in college suffer from chronic 
intellectual indigestion, ,ind e\eii ^et to 
feelin^j ih.it if they are not over-htiiHed 
there must Ik; sonielhiiiK wrtiiiK with 
them. Examples of the benelits of a 
period of (piiet thought are .ill around us. 
One of the liest students in colle^- with 
us last year is now at home, and writer 
that this ye.ir of leisure has jKTmitte<l 
him to study the rare literature of his 
ancestral lanKuaKe, until he now is (not 
by his own admission) |>erlia|)s one of the 
l)est authorities on the siilijert in the 
country. Further, he has learned so niiu h 
.ibout the pictorial art of his fatlieiV 
fellow-countrymen that he may s|K'ci.il- 
ize in that line of work — although he may 
alM» follow with renewe<l interest and 
vision the hehl of s|>eri.ili/,itioii he w.is 
following here. .Another M.S.C. Itoy, 
forced out by illness, is making; jjooij 
progress in painting, and bi<ls fair to Ik- 
more h.ippy and more successful than in 
the line he originally ha<l tried to follow. 
The lienetit of his college tiaining show> 
in his trained mind, and his |H-rsistent .iiid 
orderly study of his new field, and hente 
is by nri means w.isted in a c.ireer whicii 
will yet sherl lustre on his .ilma m.iter. 
Another recent companion of tnirs hofies 
ne.\t year to t.ike .i whole ye.ir simply to 
read, to think. ,ind to write. Will that Ik- 
a waste of time? Since he is a high honor 
student, he should make grKxl use of such 
.1 priceless time of leisure. 

As already said, only a few (»f iis can 
attain to "honors" courses in which 
leisure is subsidized by wealthy lolleges 
or universities; and fewer can go to great 
universities abroiid where a tutorial 
system might help us find ourselves in- 
tellectually. But many of us can do 
something in the same line even while in 
the midst of the rush of pushing college 
life, or, if forced out of the race tempo- 
rarily, can still more thoroughly re-orient 
ourselves, and return to the r.ice re- 
freshed, strengthened, and with a witler 
and sfjunder vision of life. 

Is not this a {)ossible bright sirle to the 
flepr.'ssion? 

Xenos 



Hamilton Trounces State; 
Providence Here Tonight 



VERMONT HOOP TEAM 
AT STATE SATURDAY 



Smarting under the ilcfeats received at 
the hands ol the last three op|Muieiits, 
Coach Freddy Klieil's M,ii)M>n .ind While 
basketeers will iii.ike delerniine<l al- 
tcnipts to liie.ik into the win (oliiiim 
again, playing Pro\ idem i- College in 
Ainher.st tonight and meeting Veriuont 
on the Cage Moor, IVhruary 11. 

Last year, Pro\ itience C\)llege was one 
of the few teams to defeat the Maroon 
and White combine, the I'riars drubbing 
State in .Xinherst ."JCi-M. Phe opinion 
was expressed by many interested basket- 
b.ill followers th.it Providence Collevie 
was the ImsI basketball team to play 
Slate in Amherst last year. This year's 
five, while it iloes not |M)ssi-ss as brilliant 
a record as the iy.'12 Friars team, has 
amassed a res|)ectablc- niimher ol vic- 
tories over collegiate rivals. 

The Vermonters broke into the win 
column for the first time with a victory 
over St. Michael's in an overtime con- 
test, y«>-.'{8. In its List g.ime, the Univer- 
sity of Vermont ti\e showed plenty of 
scoring jjower, edging out a victory over 
New Hampshire, in an overtime |M>ric>d, 
27-2'>. New liainpshire, coiuiueror of 
State this year, 4(5 ;{1, led i:}-7 at half 
time but the Veriiumters tied the s<c>re 
JK-fore the regulation game time ended 
and went on to win the contest in the 
overtime |)eri()d. P.ilmer, guard, and 
Ramon, forward, are the scoring stars of 
the \'erniont (umbiiie. 



Marge Jensen Features 

Sigma Beta Chi Win 

Winning from Phi Zeta with .i score of 
.'{."> to 14, Sigma Beta Chi l»ecamc cham- 
pions ill the intersororily basketball coin- 
pelitioii in a game I hiirsd.iy , l-ehriiarj 
'2 in the Drill H.ill. The first two games 
in the com|K-tilion resiiltcvl ;is follows: 
Phi Zeta 24, .\lplia Lambda .\lu 21; 
Lanilwla Delta Mu 24, .Sigma Bel.i Chi .'U). 
Then the winner'-, Phi Zeta .ind .Sigma 
Beta Chi played, with Sigiii.i Bel.i (hi 
winning ."Cj to 14. Thiirsd.iy. February 9 
they will play the non-sorority girls. 

Follciwing is the line ii[) of the fiii.d 
game: 



BUSH SCORES 12 FOR 
MAROON AND WHITE 

Un.ible to co|h' with the |M>werful 
olTensive att.uk of the New X'ork five, 
M.iss.ii liusetts State lost its third suc- 
cessive game, f.illing at the hands of a 
strong Hamilton College b.iskelli.ill team, 
42 2."i. in Clinton, N. Y. on Icliriiary 4. 
The Continentals' victory over the State 
fisi- w.is its second win in as many days 
.iiid .iviiigi-d I he defe.it sullerecl by 
H.imilton in Amherst last year, Slate 
drubbing lite New Yorkers, 42 22. 

The .Si, lie hoop team sl.irticl strong 
.igainst ilamillon, with Bush and llouran 
tossing in double dec kcrs. After the first 
ten miiuiles ol pl.iy, I he ElUrtineii were 
leading the New York team, 51-8. How- 
ever, from this (Ntint on, the Hamilton 
olTensive began to function and the Con- 
lineiilals gr.idiiaiiy began to draw away 
from the Mass;u hiiseils team. Hamilton 
i-aptiired a 14-9 lead over Si.ite with 
about live minutes to pl.iy in the fust 
half and were never again headed. The 
stole .It the ii.ilf W.IS Hamilton 24, Stale 15 

During the second h.ilf Hamilton 
scored two baskets to every twin-|N)inter 
tossed ill by the Massac liusetts athletes. 
The Slate guards touhl not slop the reck- 
less, carefree yet sensiitiiinal scoring 
attack of the Ilamillon team, the New 
Vol k pl.iyers tossing in baskets from all 
impossible angles. Lou Bush, State for- 
w.irel, led the M.itoon and White Morers 
with 12 |H)inls. C.ipt.iin Hoiiian fea- 
ttirecl defc'iisi\'ely , holding his forw.ird to 
two baskets and tossing in three baskets 
himself. The score: 



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Enter "The College Barber Shop" Contest 



"M" HI II,!)I\(i 



FEBRUARY ONLY 



CASH PRIZES 



DEERSKIN and PIGSKIN GLOVES 

Special at $1 .55 

Reductions on all Overcoats, 
Topcoats, Wool Coats and Horschide Coats 



SPF<IN(; MALLORY IfATS AKK KIIADY 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



of the game, the .Middlebury coach le- 
placed his goalie fiy a forward and sent 
the entire sextet into State's territory in 
a desperate attempt to tie the score. 

The line-up: 

Maat. State Middlebury 

Hammond, rw 
( ain. c 
W. Brown. Iw 
A. Brown, Id 
McGuckian, g 



Iw, Uwyer 
c. Ycwmans 

rw, (;iarke 
Id. H. .Ma<l>ean 
rd. U. MacLean 



Goals — Cain 2. Clarke, Dwy'^r. Corcoran. 
Mas-H. State spares— Snow. Henry, Corcoran. 
Middlebury spares— .Melba. Dwyer. Swett, Pick- 
ends, Westin. 



FINAL REDUCTION 
ON BOSTONIAN SHOES 

f8..50 Grade $7.65— .|K.f)fj c;ra(le $7.20-$7.f)() f;aa»le $6.30 

OTHER BOSTfJNIANS $4.45 . . . $5.45 

Now is the time U) buy Hostonians at a saving 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



If you desire real good merchandise at moderate prices, trade at 
Switzers. Langrock Clothes, Schoble Hats, Buffalo Shirts, and Nunn- 
Bush Shoes are some of the lines we carry and are sold only at . . . 



E. M. SWITZER JR., Inc. 



?.!. A. C. Library. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8. 1933 



HICKEY-FREEMAN CLOTHES 

Men of good judgment know that good clothes are the best investment. They have a true 

vahiation of distinctive appearance both in style and fit. 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



THE COLLEGE SPECTATOR 
(Contlnuad from Paft* I) 

gested that these mottoes l>e exchanged 
among the different nations; thereby 
causing America to "Buy French," 
Great Britain to "Buy American," and 
France to "Buy British." 



AN ENGLISH EXPLANATION 

A poem entitled "The Road to Harp- 
er's Ferry" was recently published in the 
London Spectator. This bit of |)oetry of 
fourteen lines attempted to descril)e 
degenerate American life as contrasted 
with the idealism represented by Harper's 
Ferry. The |K)et in his description says: 
"Life is a lounge with a Lucky handy." 
An asterik was attached to the word 
"Lucky" and a foot note at the lK)ttom 
of the page generously explained that a 
"Lucky" was: "a cigarette much es- 
teemed by the young ladies of America." 



wrongs of fourteen years." 

POPULAR SONGS 

The ten moat [wpular songs during 
19;{2 were listed by Macy's sheet music 
department recently. These ten songs 
were chosen on the basis of the numl)er of 
copies sold. A song "hit" usually sells 
as many as 2(X),0(K) copies, one-tenth as 
many as a "hit" sold ten years ago. The 
ten s«ngs are: "All American (iirl," 
"Let's Put Out the I-ight," "Play, Fiddle, 
Play," "Say It Isn't so." "How Deep is 
the Ocean," "Please," "Fit As a Fiddle," 
"We Just Couldn't Say Gootlbye," 
"Mas<iuerade," "Shanty in Old Shanty 
Town." 



ADOLPH HITLER 

Hitler's radio address which consisted 
of his Cabinet's election manifesto sounds 
very much like the campaign sjieech of a 
very conservative Democrat or Republi- 
can. The difference l)etween Hitler's 
address and the campaign s|)eech lies in 
the earnestness, the zest, and the ora- 
torical i)ower with which Hitler's address 
was delivered. The extract which follows 
may have been taken from an address 
given in New York or Berlin. 

"The government of national resur- 
rection wants to work, and it will work. 
It has not brought low the German 
(American! nation in fourteen years, but 
it will raise it upward again. It is de- 
termined in four years to make good the 



DAVID BARRY 

Sergeant-at-Arms Barry's statement 
that a "few Congressmen were known to 
sell their votes" brings to mind the charges 
of bril)ery against Francis Bacon. This 
accusation of Congressmen which no 
doubt is backed by some proof is a 
severe indictment of our parliamentary 
iHxly. The Springfield Republican com- 
ments upon the statement by asking this 
question: "May not this be a part of the 
process of disintegration, if not the degra- 
dation that parliamentarism, is under- 
going in all countries while everywhere 
ideals of autocracy seem to grow in 
public favor?" 



composed of comparatively young men 
who are new to politics and who represent 
the so-called "best brains" in the nation. 
They are: Samuel Rosenman, a Phi Beta 
Kappa at Columbia and former Judge 
who is 37 years of age; Raymond Moley, 
professor of public law at Columbia, and 
number one of the Kitchen Cabinet 46; 
Hugh Johnson, known as a brilliant all- 
around genius among the members of the 
Brain Trust, a soldier, author, econo- 
mist, and lawyer, 50; Adolf Berle Jr., 
theoretical economist who as a child 
prodigy trotted around the Harvard 
campus in knickerbockers, 88; Rexford 
Guy Tugwell, one of the authors of 
"American Economic Life," 41; and 
Charles Taussig, an expert of foreign 
affairs, 30. 



MARDI GRAS HELD IN 

FULL COSTUME THIS YEAR 
(CoadnuMl from PsO* D 

chaperones, acted as judges for the award 
of prizes for the best costumes. The 
following awards were made: best man's 
costume, Benton Cummings '33; best 
woman's costume, Helen Reardon '36; 
best couple, Lois Frederick '35 and 
Edward Tallwt '34, with a second prize 
to Agnes McMahon '33 and Edward 
Harvey '33. President and Mrs. Hugh 
P. Baker were at the Mardi Gras for a 
short time. 



KITCHEN CABINET 

The group of men whom Roosevelt has 
gathered about him as unofficial advisors 
has been called variously the Brain Trust 
and the Kitchen Cabinet. The Kitchen 
Cabinet is of course unofficial and is 



SEE DAVE FOR YOUR BANQUET ATTIRE 
TUXS-SHIRTS-TIES 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS & LAUNDERERS 

Phone 828 Near the Town Hall Phone 828 



SKI TOGS AND 

SKATING TOGS for 

STATE COLLEGE 

MEN and WOMEN! 

COLODNY 

CLOTHING 

CO. 

32 MAIN ST. 

{Near Pepot) 

NORTHAMPTON, 
MASS. 

We stock full line of Ladies 

Ski Pants, Jackets, Ski Boots 

and Riding Habits. 

(Free Carfare on Purchases 
of $5.00 or over) 



FISHER'S 



YARDLEY'S 

Compacts 
Toilet Water 
Dusting Powder 
Face Powder 
Talcum Powder 
Complexion Cream 
Bath Salts 



COLLEGE COSTS 

BELOW AVERAGE 

(CentlBiMd rrom Pat* D 

State is by no means the least expensive 
of a group selected at random. The 
average estimates of one year's expenses 
in the various college catalogues is Ije- 
tween $470 and $575, while the M.S.C. 
Bulletin places expenses between $40;} and 
$575. As compared with a $990 and up- 
ward average of expenses for endowed 
colleges however, the position of this 
college is not within the ex{)ensive group. 
In most cases the largest expense is 
that of food which varies between $180 
and $;?S0 a year, or $5 to $1 1 per week. 
Rooms cost from $45 at (Oregon State 
Agricultural College to $2«)0 at Amherst 
College. Clemson Agricultural College in 
South Carolina has room and board 
available for $U><) per year. The recent 
rise in tuition to $UK) places Mass. State 
above the $89 average for land grant 
colleges but well l>elow the $4(K) fee of 
endowed colleges. Other expenses^- books, 
laundry, clothes, student activities, etc. 
--classed as incidental, are the greatest 
variable factor and vary from $58 at 
Clemson to $750 at Dartniouth, the 
average being $150. 

Geographically, the l)est locations are 
in the South and West. Clemson Aggie 
costs $2(54 while Utah Aggie comes next 
with a $:J25 charge. The most expensive 
institutions are in New England where 
I even some land grant colleges, such as 
M.l.T. and the University of Vermont, 
have charges comparable to those of 
endowed colleges. 



EUROPEAN COLLEGES 

RAISE REQUIREMENTS 
(Continued from Pat* 

inary consideration to the Association of 
American Medical Colleges. The inten- 
tion of the Ministry is, while reserving, 
naturally entire freedom of judgment as 
to the eligibility of candidates, to take 
full account of the findings of the Associ- 
ation. 



"The prime reason for the step taken 
by the Consultative Committee was the 
difficulty of rightly evaluating the medi- 
cal credentials of American candidates. 
The medical schools in Great [Britain had 
been confronted by the same difficulty. 
The solution lay in accepting the offer of 
the Association of American Medical 
Colleges to charge itself with the evalu- 
ation of the credentials of all Americans 
applying for admission to British medical 
schools. The arrangement Ijetwecn the 
Association and the British schools 
proved entirely satisfactory. It reduced 
by ninety percent the numl)er of .Ameri- 
can medical students in the United 
Kingdom."— NSFA 



AMHERST INSTRUCTOR 

SPEAKS AT CHAPEL 
(ContlnuMl from Pat* 1) 

plenty. 

Our education, too, is becoming mech- 
anized. Elducation should be individual. 
The late \Voo<lrow Wilson said, "Edu- 
cation is a mature mind working upon 
an immature mind,"— a far different 
principle from the one which guides 
educators today! 

"Likewise," said Mr. Cleland, "have 
we lost much from our church. Onre it 
was that families gathered at the close 
of the day to hold communion simply Ijy 
the breaking of bread and the partaking 
of wine. Toilay our religion is carried by 
machinery, and communion is a time for 
church-members to gather at the last 
minute in order that they may have the 
rites of christening, marriage and burial 
performed free." 

Closing with a challenge to his listen- 
ers, Mr. Cleland said, "Most of you are 
religious vagalxjnds; you have a chance 
to make religion real for yourselves. 

DR. BAKER ASKS FOR 

STUDENT CO-OPERATION 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

in closing, "is now in the prime of life 
and we are all keenly anxious that it 
should have a vigorous prcnluctive life. 
that it should continue to prwJuce tine 
men and women of culture and under- 
standing. Each of us is res[>onsibk- for 
our part in making the college a i;reat 
institution through hard work, co-opera- 
tion, gooil s|)ortsmanship, and frienfMiip 
It is my ho|)e as I take my place with 
you that we ma\ join together as stu- 
<lents, teachers, researchers, admiiii-tra- 
live officers, working always with i)alience 
and with understanding for a right 
appreciation of education." 



CUT YOUR COLLEGE EXPENSES 

Try GRANGER'S 



GOOD FOOD 



9 PHILLIPS ST. 



WEEKLY $o.5U 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

14 MAIN STREET 
Between Town Hall and Masonic BuUdlnft 

MEN'S WHOLE SOLES «nd JT ^K 

RUBBER HEELS ♦^•^•' 

MEN'S HALF SOLES «nd „ 1 50 

RtBBKR HEELS *•*'« 

MEN'S RUBBER HEELS .40 

LADIES' HALF SOLES^--^^^.^ 1.25 

LADIES' RUBBER HEELS .30 

LADIES' LEATHER HEELS .25 

All Work Guaranteed 



Everything in Hardware 

and Radio Equipment 

— PHILCO= 



MILITARY INSTRUCTOR 

ENLISTS FOR 9TH TIME 
(Centlnuod from Page 1) 

Following the war he l)ecame a mem- 
lier of the detached enlisted men's group 
(DEML) attached to the Massachusetts 
State College, which position he has held 
for twelve years. On January 10, 1922 
he was apiHjinted a major in the cavalry 
reserve and on February 1, 1922 was 
promoted to technical sergeant. 

During the time that Sergeant Warren 
has l)een a member of the R.O.T.C. unit 
on campus he has become very well 
known as an expert hoiseman, a gootl 
sijortsman, and an able instructor of a 
subject in which he has first-hand know- 
ledge. Sergeant Warren is a familiar 
figure at all the neighboring horse shows. 
At the last Hartford horse show. "Bonnie," 
Sergeant Warren up, won the (Governor's 
trophy. With Sergeant Warren riding, 
"lionnie" has won over 75 ribljons of 
which approximately one-half are the 
coveted blue ribbons, numerous cups, 
trophies and cash prizes. 



HERE SOON 

in "KID 

FROM SI'AIN ' 

Eddie Cantor 



AMHERS 



HERE SOON 

Leslie Howat'J 

Ann Harding in 

ANIM.\L KINt.IX^M 



WED.. THURS.. FEB. 9-l» 
RONALD COLMAN 

in "CYNARA" 

with 
KAY FRANCIS 



SAT., FEB. 11—2 Features 

Edna Mae Oliver 

J. Gleason — Mae Clarke 

Rob't Armstrong — in 

"PENQUIN POOL 

MURDER" 

—co-feature — 

Carole Lombard— Pat OBrien 

in "VIRTUE" 



MON.. FEB. 13 



Fredric March 
Claudette Colbert— in 

"TONIGHT IS OURS" 

From tiie play by Noel Conrad 

with Allison Skipworth 

Arthur Byron 



TUES.. FEB. 14 — 2 Feature s 

Barbara Stanwyck — in 

"LA lES THEY TALK ABOUT" 

co-feature— "MONKEY S PAW" 

with an all star cast 



WED.,-THURS.. FEB. 15-lh 

You will never forget it— Oecil B. DeMille'a 
"SIGN OF THE CROSS' -with Fredric March 

Elissa Landi — Claudette Coltert 
Charles Laugfaton and T300 others _. 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUM PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

35 SOUTH PLEASANT STREET 



PRE SHRUNK BROADCLOTH SHIRTS 
Fast Colors $1.00 each They Will Fit 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SANG Tl IMC HAND LAUNDRY 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES 

North Amherst 



No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE PRICES 

Ottr Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and for Rent 

H. E. DAVID 



College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST. - MASS. 



Dine and Dance 

at 
CLUB DEADY 



Typing 
First Class Work Low Rates 

MARION BROADFOOT 

Tel. 494-M opp. "Phi Sig" House 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

MNHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



THE CANDY KITCHEN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 



SARRIS BROS. 
CANDY KITCHEN RESTAURANT 



INCORPORATKO 



A CURRENT EVENT IN 
THE COLLEGIAN 



Read "Dynamic Education" 
a ttudent's evaluation of 
the American educational 
gyvtem In today's contribu- 
tion to the Agora. 



/ftassacbusi 




•s 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
or THE WEEK 



The mcMt ■litnlAcant event 
uf the past week U the amall 
number of aludenu minted 
on l>ean'« Hoaril luit Satur- 
day. 



Vol. XLIII 



AMHERST MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1933 



Number 16 



Professor Fraker Speaks 
On Modernistic Movement 



Language Professor Interprets 
Modern Poets 



Interpreting Modernism as an attempt 
to tind an original thought or to express 
an old thought in a new and unused way, 
Dr. Charles Fraker of the French depart- 
ment spoke on "Some Motlernists" at the 
I,anguage and Literature talk last eve- 
ning. Dr. Fraker supplemented his talk 
l)y readings from the works of modern 
English, French, and Spanish iM)ets. 

"Mo«lernism," Professor Fraker e.\- 
pltined. "is not modern; it is only a 
cyclic epidemic, the precurrent sympton 
of which is a keen desire for recognition 
as an original spirit. English teachers in 
our schools continually attach the word 
trite' to our expressions and make us 
realize the crime of saying something 
which has been said iKjfore, so we, as 
students, search for a new thought, or a 
new way to express an old idea and the 
inevit.ihle result of this search for novelty 
is iu(xleriiism." 

l»r. Fraker said that not all modernistic 
inovtMiients had exactly the same tendency 
as the American movement. Another 
manifestation of "Modernism" was the 
search for lost illusions and beauty. This 
manifestation is to he found jxirticidarly 
in the St)uth American poets, in Marti, a 
Culian, in Silva, a Columbian, in Nerve, 
a Mexitan, and in Dario, a .Nicaraguan. 
Certain .\merican jxiets have intluenced 
these writers, notably Edgar Allan Poe. 

"Dario. the leader of the Mrxlernists 
in.Sjiilh .America," Dr. Fraker continued, 
"by combining all of the l)eautiful ele- 
ments of all other sch<j<)ls of literature has 
succeeded in creating a new and musical 
verse. These nuKlernists, as men of many 
sides, are interested in death, in the 
Ijcauty of the words with which they 
exi»re->s their thoughts, in music, in verse, 
and in the expression of the subtle changes 
in human experience." 

(Continued on Paft* i. Column 1) 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON WINS 
INTERFRATERNITY SING 



College 
Spectator 



R.\DI() CITY 

When theatrical men and financiers 
gather in New York City, there is talk 
which concerns the heavy drain on the 
H'Mkfeller fortune caused f)y the cost of 
the Radio City experiment. It is* not 
generally known however, that the 
current exjKMises of this project are paid 
with interest on $45(),()(X),000 worth of 
t.ix exempt Ixjnds which were set aside 
for just such a purpose. The principle 
has not been touched as yet. 



RLSSIA 

Newspapermen who untlerstand and 
^re in close touch with the Russian 
^itu.ition are hinting that Stalin may be 
werihrown in the near future. The 
recent riots and revolts of the peasants 
-lugurs ill for Stalin as the revolting 
f«'<i^ints can dictate when the inhabitants 
"f the cities may eat. 



'•tKIODICAL 

bi Washington, there ate rumors that 
<i new national magazine will \ie pub- 

j lishcii after Roosevelt's inauguration. 
This pcrirKlical will have radical ten<len- 

I ws and will attack all the political 
rMrt.. |„,i ,.^.p„ ji^g capitalistic system. 

, rf'!iiiiKiu newspapermen are refKjrted 
'^ t-e back of the venture and will supply 
the money and talent necessary. 



I '^ AR KRELGAR 

The lev;(ii,|> ihont Ivar Kreugar t)e- 

jcomc more fantastical than ever. The 

latest one l,eside the tale that he faked 

jsnictck. t„ keep a tryst with Greta Garbo 

'"Terns an illegitimate son. This son 

"'Ml when Kreugar was a young man 

(Continued on Pag* 3, Ottaaa 3) 



Lambda Chi Alpha and Theta Chi 
Second and Third 

Sigma I'hi Epsilon, presenting ".Mass.i- 
chusetts Mere's to Thee" and ".Memories," 
a fraternity song, took first place in the 
annual Interfr.iternity Sing heUI in 
Howker .'\uditorium at \.'M) p.m. I.ist 
Saturda\ afterii<M)n. Second place was 
awarded to Lamlxla Chi Alpha, ihirtl to 
Theta Chi, and fourth to Ka|)pa Kpsilon, 

Harmony, tone (juality, enunciation, 
and inteipretatiun were among the |)oints 
tronsidered by the judg«'s, Mrs. .\rlhur M. 
IJeaumont, I>r. Miles II. Cubbon, and 
IVofessor Clark I-. Thayer, in awarding 
|M>ints in the competition. Nine fraterni- 
ties were represented in the sing. (J.T.V., 
although its presentation was given 
honorable mention by the judges, was 
(iiscjualilied from competition lnvause the 
group lacked the nuud>er siH-tilied. 

I'ollow'ng the program the usual group 
(Continued on Pafte .4, Column 3) 

Military Ball 

To Be March 4th 



Decoration Plans Kept Secret 

Jackie Jackson and his Cotton Pickers 
will furnish music for the Military Hall, 
which will be held in the Drill Mali on 
March 4, from 8 to 12 o'chxk. This 
orchestra is considered to be the l)est 
colored band in New England, and has 
played for the Dartmouth Winter C.irni- 
val during the past week, and for several 
fraternity dances at both Dartmouth and 
Bowdoin colleges. 

According to Menjamin Betts ".i:i, who 
has charge of the decorations, the setting 
of the ball will \)C kejU secret until the 
night of the dance. The ccjst of tickets 
will l)e $'2.'A) per couple. The committee 
in charge of the dance is comiKiscd of 

B. D. Cunnnings '.{;{, C. E. Minarik 'Xi, 

C. L. Gleason '33, C. A. LeClair '33, P. 
I., miand '34 is the junior representative. 



ANNOUNCE.VIENT 

The Collegian will l>e distributed on 
Thursday, Febiuary 2."}, next week, 
because of the holiday on Wednewlay, 
February 22. 



Rabbi Harry Kaplan 

Sunday Chapel Speaker 

"Ours is the task of repairing and sal- 
vaging a world crushed by moral and 
spiritual bankruptcy. Ours is the task of 
instilling into an ailing civilization the 
majestic vision of Isaiah and his affir- 
mation of the siinctity and holiness cif 
life," declared Rabbi Marry K.iplan of 
Pittsfield in his .Sunday Cha|>el address 
in Bowker .-Xuditorium on February 12. 

Stating that religion teaches «jt her ideals 
than those which modern industrial, 
economic, and commercial life are stress- 
ing. Rabbi Kaplan pc.inted out that it is 
possible for a great world culture to lie 
developed with worid ideals and universal 
sympathies. 

"I can conceive," continued the sfjeak- 
er, "of our schcM)ls producing scientists, 
chemists, engineers and inventors who 
will Ijc fdled with a passion for scxiety 
so that they would not dream of produc- 
ing pcjison gases and destructive instru- 
ments which in case of war could be 
used for destroying their fellowmen." 

Since the adolescent days of .American 
college life are past, with the thought- 
lessness and "rah-rah" element. Rabbi 
Kaplan sees the emerging seriousness of 
the modern college youth as one of the 
foremost signs of hope for ihis age. 




iUSCHA SKlUkl, 

Toscha Seidel 

Gives Concert 

Famous N'iolinist on Community 
(k>ncert Pro(>rani 



Baker Speaks of College 

Record and Alumni 



Toscha Seidel, violinist, assisted by 
Merltert JalTe, at the piano, will .ipiH'.ir 
at the Audierst Conununity Concert on 
Wednesday evening, l-Vbru.uy 22, at 
S.;{0 in the old College N.dl at Aiidiersl 
Ccjilege. When Mr. Seidel made his debut 
in America several \ears ago, he scored 
a genuine success, (he critics conceding 
him a pl.iie with the greatest contcm(N)- 
rary violinists. 

Tosch.i Seidel lielongs tcj that small and 
select group that came originally from 
the Russian studio of the great Leopold 
Auer, and which included also lleifetz, 
I'-lman, and Zimbalist. Like the others 
he was a l)oy prodigy, though of sciiiie- 
whal Liter date, and like them, he c on- 
cpiered his Americui amliences immedi- 
ately. Mr. .Seidel's success has not In-en 
confined to the I'nited Stales; his recent 
tours of England and the S:.indinavian 
countries electrified his foreign auciiences 
and c ritirs. When he j>lay«-c| the diflic ult 
Brahms Concerto in London, the I'atly 
Mail sijid, "Kreisler at his liest did not 
play the Brahms Concertcj with more 
animated passion than this youth, who 
showed no intimidation at its oppressive 
traditions, rather handling it artily, 
whereby the music lived more warmly." 

The program for Wednesday evening 

is as follows: 

I 
Concprlo in A Minor Bath 

Allegro ma non tanto 
Andante 
AllpKro a.ssai 

Mr. Seidel 

II 

Suite Sinding 

Presto 
Adagio 
Tempo guisto 

Mr. Seidel 

III 

Nocturne, Opus 5.5, No. 1 Chopin 

Inlermorzo. Opus 117. No. 3 lirahmt 

Ktudf liroica Li\2i 

Mr. Jaffe 

IV 

Praeludium and Allegro f'ugnani- Kreisler 

Perpetual Motion Nacacek 

Mr. Seidel 



Banquets Held 

By Fraternities 

Local and Out - of - Town llotelti, 
Scenes of Festivities 

As a celebration of the termination of 
Hell Week and ihe enrollment of new 
meinUrs within the boiul of brotherhood, 
fr.iternilies h-ft c.inipus on the eve of 
SiUurday, February II, for their annual 
bancpiets in Amherst, Northampton .ind 
other tr.tdition.d s|)ots. Old .Muimii were 
welcomed back, blushing initiates intro- 
duced, old stories retold, and nuich food 
consumed. 

y.T.V. sunuuoned its memliers to the 
I)aven|>ort Inn where Kenneth Barn.ird 
'2.'{ ortic i.ited as toast m.isler. The Motel 
North.implon was the scene of I'hi 
.Sigma Kappa's feast. Tcjastmaster David 
Buttrick '17 called U|Mm Joseph Root 'H\ 
.iiicl Charles Howe '7S to le.ul the story 
telling. 

Thel.i Chi also decided to leave town, 
visiting the Motel .Northampton, as did 
Sigm.i I'hi Epsilon. Prof. li. N. (dick 
addiessed the liaiu|ueteers of Theta Chi. 
The princ ip,il spc-.ikci .it I he Sig Ep meet- 
ing w.ts 'IVd Sh.iwn, (.imous d.incer from 
.Sigma K|>silc>n Beta chapter. Other 
s|K'akers were Dr. Culler, Professctr 
Kellogg, and < .eorge ICinery '24. 

Norman Mytick '31 led l.audMla Chi 
.Alpha's evening of feast and fest at the 
Lord Jelfery Inn. Alph.i Sigma Phi held 
a (estiincuii.d li.irKpiel foi Dr. Joseph 11. 
Lindsey at the Lord Jeffery. Earl Car- 
j)enttr iiitrodiiccd ihc- s|M'akers, Dr. 
(ioldthw.iite, l>r. Peters, and Dr. Came. 

RoUrt C. Tetro '32 led the story 
telling at Alpha (iamma Kho's bancpiet 
at the Lord Jeffery. Professoi Clark L. 
Thayer '1.3 welcomed the new meml»ers. 
Professctr Cl.irence H. P.illerson was in- 
trcKluced by Calvin (,'artwright as princ i- 
l>al s|K'aker when the Motel Perry was 
visited by Kappa Fpsilon. Delta Phi 
Alpha met at Lord JefTery Inn under the 
charge of toast master Sidney Shepard '3.3. 

Kap|>a Sigma is having its bancpiet 
next week at the Lord JeflF. 



Speaks Over Stations WRZ and 
WB/A in SprinftUeld 



NOTICE 

Any desiring tickets bjr the Mase- 
field lecture in .Springfield c>n Feb. 2() 
should see Mr. Rand Ijeforc Thursday 
n<M>n. These ticrkets are $1.10 and are 
in a reserved State College blcK-k. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

/ hiAd that tit need nothing m divine, and 
the te^! a man needs the nearer doth he 
approach divinity. 

-Srjcrates. Ouoted by Xenephon 



Wednesday, February 15 

7.(X) p in. Animal Husbandry Club meeting, 

StfM kbrlrlKf Hall 
M.(X) p.ni. V'ar-ily llasketball. Tufts, cage 
Ttiuntday, February 16 

7..'tO p ni. Hand KHh<'ar!<al, Memorial Hall 
Friday, February 17 

7.(XJ p in. S«i \.i\ I nion. Dartmouth ("ollege 

.Musital ( lubs 
8..30 p.m. Informal. Drill Hall 
Saturday, February 18 

l..'{(lp.m. ( hf-s anri Checker Club, 
Mrmorial Mall 

Sunday. February I* 

9.W a.m. Sunday ( hapel, Rev. Sydney 

I^vett 
3(X»pm. I'hilharmonc Concert, Memorial 
Hall 

Monday, February 20 

><,:.V) p.m. <»I<-«' (luh. .Memorial Hall 
Tuewiay, February JI 

6.t.'> p.m. Language and Litiratur>- T.ilk. 
Stofkbridge 
Wednenday, February 22 

s.OU p.m. Varsity Basketball, AmherHt 
H..'JO p.m. Community (Concert, Tosha 
Seidel. College Hall 



Five Students Attend 

Northfield Conference 

0|jening the ninth annual Northfield 
.Midwinter Conference at the .Northfield 
Motel on Friday night, February 10, Dr. 
W. A. Visser 't M«x>ft addressed delegates 
frcjm .New EnglanrI colleges on the sub- 
ject, ".Movements of Thought and Ac tjon 
amcjng Students Today." Discussing 
Naticjnalism, Conunimism, and Christi- 
anity, Dr. 't McHift dcdaiecl thai the two 
former movements were more passionate 
than Christianity, but that they have 
cjne iclea and one aim, whereas since the 
core of Christianity is the oUnlience to 
the will of (iwl, it will never l»e reduced 
to a cut and driecl system. 

C.roup worshij) l)efore the lire started 
the second day cjf the c:onference, followed 
by a forum b.ised on the ojiening adclress. 
A bancpiet with an address by l>r. Menry 
P. Van Dusen featured the second 
evening, when Dr. Van Dusen expressed 
the necessity c>f faith, fxjinting out that 
one who (*elieves in the gocnlness <A (icKl 
lielieves not in eviclence, but in something 
fjcyonrl evidence. 

Closing the ccmferencc, E. Fay Camp- 

l^ell sununcd up the various ways one 

may arrive at knowledge cif God: by 

appreci.itinx the lieautiful; by stuclying 

(Continued on Page .<, Column 3) 



Mis impressions of the college, its 
rec-ord of service, its aliinmi, and some of 
the |)roblems of the future were the 
subjects of a radio l.ilk presented last 
evening by Hugh P. B.iker, newly elected 
president of the Mass.i( hiisetts State 
College. The talk which was presented 
from Springfield over st.ilioiis WBZ and 
W BZA w.is arr.inged by the Boston 
Alumni Club which President Baker will 
acldress on Thiirsd.iv of this wi-i-k. 

In o|)ening his I. ilk President Baker 
s;iid: 

"I h.ive been president of I he college 
for but two weeks, so I sjK-ak as one who 
looks u|M)n it from the outside. Long 
Ijcfore I haci any thought of iH'ccuning 
.isscni.ited with M.iss;ic hiisetis .St.ile I 
w.is impressed w'th its rontribtilions to 
strience and education and with the 
c-aliber and achievements of some of its 
alumni. The |M'ople of M.iss.u husetts 
generally do not appreciate I he splendid 
repiit.ilion which iheir st.ile (ollege enjoys 
lliroiigluiiit I he n.ilion and lo some degree 
in foreign l.iiids. 

"This college h.is been .i |)ioneer in the 
field of .igric iillur.il sc ience and viM.itional 
higher education. For example, the first 
lee tiires on lee hnic.il foresir\ delivered in 
any college in this i:ountry were those by 
Prof. B. E. Fernow in IKK7. 

"This was the first college in the 
country lo organi/.e sep.ir.ite teaching 
de|i,irtments of pmnology llorii ult lire, 
l.indsca|>e g.irdeiiing, vegetable garden- 
ing, agric-ultiir.il economics, and agricul- 
tur.il ediii.ilion. VlemlM-rs of the college 
staff or its graduates were the first to dis- 
cover the presenie in this (oiiniry of 
m.iny foic-ign i usee I |ms(s, including 
brown tail moth, Oiiental moth, gvpsy 
m(»lli, and ICiiro|»e;iu corn iMirer. College 
men also playc-d ,in iiii|M>rtant part in 
developing contrcjl methods. The dis- 
(Continued on Page .). Ck>lumn I) 

MUSICAL CLUBS AT 

NEXT SOCIAL UNION 

Orchestra, fJee Club, and Rand, 
Finish Season February IS 



A pleasing array of orchestial and vocal 
niimlM-rs of Iwdh classic and sl.indard 
apix-al will be odered as the fifth Scjcaal 
Union (irogram of the term at Bowker 
Auditorium, Thursd.iy evening, February 
2.'J at 7 p.m., when the State College 
Musical Clubs will present their annual 
review. Tentative plans, according to 
Edgar .Sorton "S.i, director of the ore hcs- 
tra, and W. f irant Dunham, le.ider of the 
chor.il clubs and the band, include 
symphonic selections by the orchestral 
ensemble, classical anci semi-classical 
cjfTerings by the string cjuartet, ballad and 
stand.ird inter|)relalions by the glee club, 
and popiil.ir numl»ers by a m.ile cjiLirtet 
now in formation. 

The progr.im will mark the c uliiiin.ition 
of the ye-ar's miisie.il work by the iK-st in 
stiirlent t.ilent on campus, and should 
[irove to Im' a definite indication of the 
inereasiug interest in fuusic which has 
liecn noticeable since the change of the 
college name-. 

Highlight s Cif the piogram will U; the 
()la\iiig of the elynamic and colorful 
"Prometheus" overture of Beethoven, 
and the first movement of the First 
.Sym(ihf>ny, iKjth e^f which exhibit the 
massive instrumentation, dramatic spirit 
and liold dissonant cpiality of Beethoven's 
ceilorf ill com|>c>sit icjns. 

The tilee Club, apfiearing for the third 
time in public; as the newest of the c lubs, 
and under the managership of David 
CosgrifT '.'{4, will inclucle among its offer- 
ings the ever f)opular "Winter Song," 
anel "Morning," by Oley Sjieaks; "M.irch 
of the Western Men," and "Shadow 
March," from the pen of RoU-rt Louis 
Stevenson, and the novelty selection, 
"The Old Man Who Said, 'Well'." 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15. 1933 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1933 







/Ilba9gacbu6eiy Collegian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts State College, Published every 
Wtdnestlay by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



EUCBNS r.URALNICK '33 

Rasmond Roval '34 
htanati*t Editors 



Joseph Politklla 
liditor-in-Ckuf 



Alfrida L. Obdwav '33 
Asiociatt Editor 



News Department 
Raymond Rovai. '34, E4ik» 
Alfrkoa L. Ordway '33 
Ruth D. CAttPMix '34 
Harbibttb M. Jacmoh '34 
Mary L. Allen '36 
Davis L. Arbnbbrg '85 
ELUAiirrH K. Hakrimgtom '35 

ediih m. paksohs ao 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 
Rdltorlal 

JOSEfH POLITBLLA .... 

Athletics 
Tbeoixikb M. Lbaky '35 £di<or 
Sn-Ai LiTTLH, Jr. '35 
GLBim F. Shaw '35 



Edward J. Talbot '84 
Aitmtitint Uanmttr 

Fkamk Batvtohb '84 
John Wood '36 



Feature 

Stanley F. Seperski '84 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Ashley B. Gurmey '83 

Butiiuit M*nct*r 



Bicbanftee 
Altseda L. Ordwat '33. BdUor 



Buelnees Aaeletanu 



W. Lawexmcb Schbnoc '84 
Ctrtutatitm Mtmatm 

Nelson Stbvbns '35 

George Pease '36 



STME 

smnc 



SOME DO — SOME DON'T, and 

nothing can he done al'out il. 

The Associated Women Students of the 
University of Alabama recently passed 
an edict forbidding co-eds to drink near- 
beer, but nothing was said about drinking 
in the vicinity of anything else or drinking 
anything else. 

ss 

Snow and co-ed panties seem to go 
hand in hand, or rather, feet in feet. 
ss 

Nap Mercier's barber-philosophy, "No 
matter how bald they get, they still have 
enough left arountl the ears so that they 
come in to get a haircut." 




DYNAMIC EDUCATION 



Subscriptions S2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 

at soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 

eve ning. _^ 

Ent««J M -cpnd-ola- _,nat_ter,« U.e Amhem Po.t 0«c.. _ Acce^Ud focmjllbg, at ^ij«lal taU 



Entered ■» tecono-oiaM inaiier m\. luc r»«»ijci-» •%»-• Y"rr- ■Tr~!rT:; Z:.^^^ 9n ioi< 
Bl peeUwTprovlded for In Section 1103. Act o( October. 1817. authori sed Auguit 80. i91i 



4. ^ EDITORIALS ^ 

THE PH.D. FETISH AND OUR FUTURE EDUCATION 



The Universality of Our school administrators and educational "progressives" 
the Ph.D. by 1950 have come to point with expectant pride to the day when 

every applicant entering the teaching profession will be required to submit, as one 
of his qualifications, the academic degree, Doctor of Philosophy. This idea has so 
captured the imagination of our executives, that Teachers' Colleges, in particular, 
have been set all agog in a frenzied rush to manufacture Ph.D.'s for the coming 
golden age of education. For this millenium, fortunately, we have not long to wait. 
One president of a middle-west State Normal College insists that this desired meta- 
morphosis is to be effected by 1950; another Teachers' College president, has taken 
pains to suggest that the Ph.D. degree shouhl Ik- protected from now on and made 
distinctly "the badge of research." With all the emphasis that higher degrees in 
clucation are receiving at the present time, it would seem quite likely that not many 
more decades will be necessary (or our completing the process of "doctonzing all 

our university instructors. 

Why not pray, this Utopianism in education? We will certainly have litK-rty, 
equality and' fraternity in our social relations by I'.tSO if only we give our g..vern.ucnt 
into the'han.h of i.loalisiic socialists, who will make all men brothers by due pnKress 
of law we will have worl.l peace, bo<lily comfort, and all the leisure time we can wish 
for if we permit our progressive "scientists" to transform our present state of things 
by inventions, and institute a "scientific" program of reform. Why not surremler 
our education to the Ph.D's? 



Is this a cure for All jesting aside, these questions are momcntard\ aproixjs'- 

our problems? With all instructors in possession of the doctor's degree 

(the final stamp of approval, as it w.-re' in their field of interest, are we not guarameed 
the highest quality in the art, as well as the content ..f teaching? Is m.l the dcKtor's 
degree conferred only after the candidate has shown himself capable of surmounting 
the intellectual obstacles which lie between his problems an.l their solution? Is not 
this dcKtorate awarded as the coronation stroke of years of educational actuity and 
self .levolopmeni <.n the part of the student? In this trend of thought, can we not 
add that the inferior quality of many university cour-es is directly attnbutable to 
the fact that most in-^tructors are immature, educationally speaking, and have not 
enough knowledge of their subject matter? 

The emptiness of (iranted the validity of these questions; this vital (luery 

contemporary research still remains: Will graduate education s<jlye these pev- 
sistent problems? One has hut to examine graduate education in opc-ration even in 
our l)est universities to understaml how sterile, slip-shod, dry, formal, thoroughly 
aca.lemic, and meaningless it is. One has but to see our graduates in the |.rocess of 
"rese irching" to realize that if the Ph.D. is the "badge of research," then it is not of 
sterling value. Research! Research! Mow fanatical we have l)ecome in this business 
of "digging out." And for what, in heaven's name do we research? For wisdom? 
For un.lerstanding? t)h, no. Only in the minutiae of meaningless facts. Not only 
is the emphasis of the gradual.- s>stem of scholarship in this research, but the candi- 
date lor the coveted tlegree must investigate not in one field, but in a special subject 
in that fiel.l. an.l, generally, in one siMxial phase of that special subject. After this 
period of specialized investigation, he [irepares his dissertation according to minute 
Bpecitications. Throughout this process, the stress is ever upon research, which too 
often means the capacity for collecting and carefully arranging the material, a method 
which refiuircs ingenuity rather than creative ability. Are contributions to knowledge 
made in this way? Does the individual student become mature and assume comi)e- 
tence to teach after l>eing put through this machinery? A pile of bricks, a writer with 
common sense has suggested, does not make architecture, no matter how neatly 
arranged We have ample evidence, though, that substances meaner than bricks, if 
neatly arranged, can too often make a Doctor of Philosophy. That doctorate, gained 
from a reputable institution, carries with it the fjlessings of undisputed authority 
for knowledge and scholarship. 

Academic Nature of In the graduate school, the student is not encouraged to 

graduate scholarship divest knowledge of its abstract and professional charac- 
ter to salvage it from a jargon of pretentious phrases; understand it first himself, and 
then inspiringly diffuse it. He is urged to attend to his own little narrow field of 
specialization. His dissertation, euphoniously styled by the gentlemen meml)ers of 
the academic fraternity "a contribution to knowledge," must be original, it is in- 
sisted. But cannot a student study a culture in its broad aspects; cannot he study 
say Plato and the Platonic doctrines as they affected subsequent philosophy; the 
meaning of Aurignacian culture; the problem of free will in Western thought, and 
subjects of a similar all-inclusive natuie? Oh, no. Such undertakings seem to lie 
tabu in the gra.luate school, ami especially for the doctor's degree. They are too far 
fetched; such investigations will not be original, which is the prerequisite of all ac- 
ceptable pieces of research, for such work has Ijeen done by oldei scholais. Addition- 
ally and here is the most oppressive thought of all for our academicians- -such an 
examination will not be as much a contiibution to academic knowledge as it will lie 
to individual growth, development, and understanding (all of this being unthinkable 
as an aim of the graduate schools How can such tenets, upheld in our graduate 
system of scholarship with but few exceptions, produce for us able, inspiring, and 
effective teachers? Of what earthly good is the production of a thesis on the correla- 

(Conttnued on Pate 4) 



89 

A Japanese student, after spending 
considerable time on the invention of a 
medical compound which was to prevent 
old age, drank a potion of his compound 
and was buried a few days later. A very 
convincing proof of his inventive genius! 

ss 

One of our own professors made a 
survey of the size of a co-ed's feet on 
campus and found that the average size 
shoe was a No. 7. This is one reason 
why these co-ed winter costumes should 
be called snowshoe ensembles instead of 
skiing outfits. 

ss 

The sophomore who had to walk home 
from the Gables the other night must 
have envied the freshmen who were out 
on their hike for at least the lowly fresh- 
men were dressed for the hike. 

ss 

Extract from a past communication to 
the Collegian. 

"One may stroll into the Memorial 
building otxasionally to watch a Iwwling 
match. The first sight to greet on^s eyes 
is the "tableau vivant" of two or three 
co-eds swaggering about nonchalantly 
smoking cigarettes. One notices, inci- 
dentally, the game into which they are 
entering with so much abst)rption. . . . 
One's imagination rushes ahead to the 
days when some of these same co-eds 
will l)e cradling rosy-cheeked babies in 
their arms. .•\nd the mothers? Oh, they 
will be improving their education with a 
book in one hand and a cigarette in the 
other, absent mindedly flicking their ashes 
into the babies' eyes, or, more appropri- 
ately, into the babies' milk." Amen. 

ss 

The Hr\ 11 .Mawr News recently ran an 
editorial to make the students aware of 
their carelessness and neglect, and this is 
what appeared: "t)ne of the few blots 
on an otherwise l)eauti(ul laiulscape has 
from time immemo